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BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART Solid black is used for the background of the designs. In the case of fragmentary vases conventions have been adopted for the ren- dering of missing areas of both background and reserve portions. These may readily be seen on the drawings. It is very difficult to achieve consistency in intensity and use of the various shades of gray, but it is hoped that
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  BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART ULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART Solid black is used for the background of the designs. In the case of fragmentary vases conventions have been adopted for the ren- dering of missing areas of both background and reserve portions. These may readily be seen on the drawings. It is very difficult to achieve consistency in intensity and use of the various shades of gray, but it is hoped that it will be found possible in general to determine from a drawing the nature of each line and surface of the srcinal design. LINDSLEY F. HALL. THREE PERSIAN MINIATURES OF THE XIV CENTURY The Museum's collection of Islamic paint- ings has been increased recently by the ac- quisition of three Persian miniatures of the Mongol school.1 These miniatures seem to belong to the same manuscript as the two leaves in the H. O. Havemeyer collection (on exhibition in Gallery E 14). They come from a large copy of Firdausi's Shah-nama, or Book of Kings, a great epic poem re- lating various episodes in the history of Iran and ingeniously combining legends and ac- tual occurrences. The most popular subjects with illustra- tors of the Mongol period were battle scenes expressing the heroic spirit shown by the Iranians in conflict with their traditional enemies, the Turanians. One of our minia- tures (fig. I) represents such an encounter. The warriors on both sides wear Mongol armor and helmets and fight with Mongol weapons-the kings, Gushtasp and Arjasp, with bows and arrows and their followers with spears. The fury of the battle has been depicted by the Persian painter with the dramatic realism characteristic of the Mon- gol school, but the mountainous landscape in the background is rendered in the sche- matic manner traditional in Iranian art. The second miniature illustrates a scene from the story of the paladins who accom- panied Shah Kai Khusrau to the end of his journey in the mountains and who, after the king's disappearance, lay down to sleep and 1Acc. nos. 36.113.1-3. Rogers Fund. Shown this month n the Room of Recent Accessions. Solid black is used for the background of the designs. In the case of fragmentary vases conventions have been adopted for the ren- dering of missing areas of both background and reserve portions. These may readily be seen on the drawings. It is very difficult to achieve consistency in intensity and use of the various shades of gray, but it is hoped that it will be found possible in general to determine from a drawing the nature of each line and surface of the srcinal design. LINDSLEY F. HALL. THREE PERSIAN MINIATURES OF THE XIV CENTURY The Museum's collection of Islamic paint- ings has been increased recently by the ac- quisition of three Persian miniatures of the Mongol school.1 These miniatures seem to belong to the same manuscript as the two leaves in the H. O. Havemeyer collection (on exhibition in Gallery E 14). They come from a large copy of Firdausi's Shah-nama, or Book of Kings, a great epic poem re- lating various episodes in the history of Iran and ingeniously combining legends and ac- tual occurrences. The most popular subjects with illustra- tors of the Mongol period were battle scenes expressing the heroic spirit shown by the Iranians in conflict with their traditional enemies, the Turanians. One of our minia- tures (fig. I) represents such an encounter. The warriors on both sides wear Mongol armor and helmets and fight with Mongol weapons-the kings, Gushtasp and Arjasp, with bows and arrows and their followers with spears. The fury of the battle has been depicted by the Persian painter with the dramatic realism characteristic of the Mon- gol school, but the mountainous landscape in the background is rendered in the sche- matic manner traditional in Iranian art. The second miniature illustrates a scene from the story of the paladins who accom- panied Shah Kai Khusrau to the end of his journey in the mountains and who, after the king's disappearance, lay down to sleep and 1Acc. nos. 36.113.1-3. Rogers Fund. Shown this month n the Room of Recent Accessions. perished in a snowstorm. Although the Shah-nama mentions the names of five pala- dins, our miniature represents only four, three of whom recline as the fourth, seated, laments the departed Kai Khusrau. In spite of its simplicity, the composition is highly effective and is typical of the narrative style of the Mongol period. The warriors occupy the foreground. Behind them are the moun- tains, and beyond appear their horses and standards-the latter carried into the upper margin of the page. The third miniature (fig. 2) depicts an episode in the history of the relations be- tween Iran and Rum (the Eastern Roman Empire). According to the Shah-nama, Caesar promised his daughter in marriage to the Iranian shah Khusrau Parwiz as a condition in the proposed alliance between the two countries but later repented of his offer. Hoping to deceive the Iranian envoys, Caesar ordered an automaton built in the form of a woman, modest, fair, and seated in trailing raiment on a goodly throne with handmaids on both sides of her. Our minia- ture represents the moment at which Khar- rad, son of Barzin, exposed the trick by recognizing that the seated figure was not a human being. The ladies of the court sur- rounding the princess are clad in richly brocaded gowns and wear their hair ar- ranged in two long pigtails after the Mongol fashion. At the left we see two rows of women, who, for the sake of the composi- tion, have been made to vary in height, those in the back row being taller than those in the front. It is an outstanding character- istic of Iranian art to disregard perspective and to follow purely decorative principles based on geometric design and pattern. The Mongol period of Persian painting, which began towards the end of the thir- teenth century and lasted through the four- teenth century, is one of the most interest- ing of Persian art. The rulers of that era were the Mongol Il-khans, who introduced Chinese art into the Near East and so in- fluenced to a great extent the evolution of Islamic art. Persian artists learned from Chinese paintings how to render landscapes and animals more realistically and even imitated the monochrome ink technique of China. perished in a snowstorm. Although the Shah-nama mentions the names of five pala- dins, our miniature represents only four, three of whom recline as the fourth, seated, laments the departed Kai Khusrau. In spite of its simplicity, the composition is highly effective and is typical of the narrative style of the Mongol period. The warriors occupy the foreground. Behind them are the moun- tains, and beyond appear their horses and standards-the latter carried into the upper margin of the page. The third miniature (fig. 2) depicts an episode in the history of the relations be- tween Iran and Rum (the Eastern Roman Empire). According to the Shah-nama, Caesar promised his daughter in marriage to the Iranian shah Khusrau Parwiz as a condition in the proposed alliance between the two countries but later repented of his offer. Hoping to deceive the Iranian envoys, Caesar ordered an automaton built in the form of a woman, modest, fair, and seated in trailing raiment on a goodly throne with handmaids on both sides of her. Our minia- ture represents the moment at which Khar- rad, son of Barzin, exposed the trick by recognizing that the seated figure was not a human being. The ladies of the court sur- rounding the princess are clad in richly brocaded gowns and wear their hair ar- ranged in two long pigtails after the Mongol fashion. At the left we see two rows of women, who, for the sake of the composi- tion, have been made to vary in height, those in the back row being taller than those in the front. It is an outstanding character- istic of Iranian art to disregard perspective and to follow purely decorative principles based on geometric design and pattern. The Mongol period of Persian painting, which began towards the end of the thir- teenth century and lasted through the four- teenth century, is one of the most interest- ing of Persian art. The rulers of that era were the Mongol Il-khans, who introduced Chinese art into the Near East and so in- fluenced to a great extent the evolution of Islamic art. Persian artists learned from Chinese paintings how to render landscapes and animals more realistically and even imitated the monochrome ink technique of China. 12 2 The Metropolitan Museum of Artis collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin  www.jstor.org  ®   BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART ULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART Two styles were developed by the painters working at the courts of Tabriz, Maragha, and Sultanieh-one based on earlier Iranian traditions, the other strongly influenced by Chinese art.2 The style represented by our three new miniatures may be regarded as transitional between the two. Several large manuscripts and separate pages in this Two styles were developed by the painters working at the courts of Tabriz, Maragha, and Sultanieh-one based on earlier Iranian traditions, the other strongly influenced by Chinese art.2 The style represented by our three new miniatures may be regarded as transitional between the two. Several large manuscripts and separate pages in this THE LECTURE PROGRAM FEBRUARY-MAY The second part of the Lecture Program for the current season will be issued this month. In it are listed in detail the gallery talks and lectures for the next four months. A brief summary of the contents follows. THE LECTURE PROGRAM FEBRUARY-MAY The second part of the Lecture Program for the current season will be issued this month. In it are listed in detail the gallery talks and lectures for the next four months. A brief summary of the contents follows. rpqPCt /-rt'e FttJo ?;J . -'i-c'P C1 ` 13 (L (( ;-`?3 C v i ?LL?.J i L-??Yj?Sq:ir i-y rpqPCt /-rt'e FttJo ?;J . -'i-c'P C1 ` 13 (L (( ;-`?3 C v i ?LL?.J i L-??Yj?Sq:ir i-y FIG. I. BATTLE SCENE. PERSIAN, MONGOL SCHOOL, XIV CENTURY IG. I. BATTLE SCENE. PERSIAN, MONGOL SCHOOL, XIV CENTURY .', ... rAA FIG. 2. KHARRAD RECOGNIZING THE PRINCESS AS AN AUTOMATON PERSIAN, MONGOL SCHOOL, XIV CENTURY .', ... rAA FIG. 2. KHARRAD RECOGNIZING THE PRINCESS AS AN AUTOMATON PERSIAN, MONGOL SCHOOL, XIV CENTURY style are preserved in libraries and private collections, the best-known being the manu- script of the Shab-nama of I330 in the mu- seum of the Top-Kapu Palace at Istanbul. The group is characterized by scenes painted on a red or tan background in a bold, sketchy manner and in colors limited to blue, bright red, orange yellow, olive or emerald green, purple manganese, and gold. M. S. DIMAND. 2 Both styles are represented n Gallery E 14. style are preserved in libraries and private collections, the best-known being the manu- script of the Shab-nama of I330 in the mu- seum of the Top-Kapu Palace at Istanbul. The group is characterized by scenes painted on a red or tan background in a bold, sketchy manner and in colors limited to blue, bright red, orange yellow, olive or emerald green, purple manganese, and gold. M. S. DIMAND. 2 Both styles are represented n Gallery E 14. For Members of the Museum five series of gallery talks are announced. Taking as his title Egypt: Four Thousand Years of a National Art, Mr. Taggart will discuss the sculpture, the painting, and the decorative arts of ancient Egypt, and will close the series of ten talks with a consideration of the idiom of Egyptian art. Miss Bradish will give four talks on the development of lace, the same number on American furniture periods, and, with the co-operation of Miss Duncan, will analyze four distinctive types 13 For Members of the Museum five series of gallery talks are announced. Taking as his title Egypt: Four Thousand Years of a National Art, Mr. Taggart will discuss the sculpture, the painting, and the decorative arts of ancient Egypt, and will close the series of ten talks with a consideration of the idiom of Egyptian art. Miss Bradish will give four talks on the development of lace, the same number on American furniture periods, and, with the co-operation of Miss Duncan, will analyze four distinctive types 13 . I -''~l 41 ), . ,, . I -''~l 41 ), . ,, -r ?t.ifI :r:?t :L?,iil 1L r......lr :---- -,- L :1 Iraassi/ -r ?t.ifI :r:?t :L?,iil 1L r......lr :---- -,- L :1 Iraassi/
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