Others

BdJc_Bordado_EmbroideredCollar

Description
Interweave Press® Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved. Embroidered Collar Cheryl Jones Who says collars are for the dogs? Make one for yourself with a piece of beautiful fabric punctuated by your own creative bead embroidery. Materials Notions Size 11° seed beads Size 2 bugle beads Focal bead or button Fabric Thin polyester batting Synthetic suede Size D beading thread or Silamide Sewing thread 1 ⁄2 sew-on snaps Tip Sharps beading needles Air- or water-soluble fabric marker Paper patte
Categories
Published
of 2
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
Who says collars are for the dogs? Make one for yourself with a piece of beautiful fabric punctuated by your own creative bead embroidery. Embroidered Collar Cheryl Jones www.interweave.com Step 1:Create a neckline pattern by tracing around a sewing pattern or the neck of a favorite blouse. Be sure to include the shoulder-slant away from the neck. Use this pattern as the guide to design the neckpiece shape. Lengthen the pattern to allow overlap for the hidden closure. Draw the design on tissue paper and try it on your neck before you commit to cutting the fabric. If your fabric has a dis- tinctive pattern, cut out your neckpiece shape from a piece of paper and use the hole to \ufb01nd the most suitable section for the shape. Step 2:Use the fabric marker to trace the pattern onto the fabric. Cut the fabric leaving a 1 seam allowance all around the shape. Use the fabric piece as the template to cut one layer of the batting. Baste or pin the batting to the wrong side of the fabric. The batting will give dimension to the \ufb01nished piece and is a good stabilizer while you re beading. Materials Size 11\u00b0 seed beads Size 2 bugle beads Focal bead or button Fabric Thin polyester batting Synthetic suede Size D beading thread or Silamide Sewing thread 1\u20442 sew-on snaps N o t i o n s Sharps beading needles Air- or water-soluble fabric marker Paper pattern material Fabric glue stick Sewing machine Ti p Choose a light- to medium-weight cotton, silk, or linen fabric. Natural \ufb01ber fabrics are easier to work with and feel better next to your skin. If you want the option of cleaning the \ufb01nished piece, pretreat the fabric appropriately. The fabric for this piece is tightly woven cotton hand dyed by Dianne McAnaney of Sarasota, Florida. Interweave Press\u00ae Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved.BEADWORK on-line Step 3:Using 1 yard of thread, anchor the tail by making a few small back stitches in the batting before passing through to the surface of the fabric. The thread can be ended in the same way. Stitch beads to complement and embellish the fabric. For this piece, seed beads in groups of three were placed randomly over the back and sides. Secure the beads with two passes of thread. The thread on the batting side of the piece will be hid- den and protected in the finished piece. Lines of seed and bugle beads were used on the front of the neck- piece to add vertical lines and emphasize the focal bead. Do not sew beads right up to the edge of the piece so you can add an edge finish. Attach the focal bead. The abalone shell button used in this piece is concave and needed extra seed beads sewn under the bottom to sta- bilize it. Freeform bead weaving with seed beads was done to conceal the button holes. Step 4:Embellish the edges. This piece was edged with two rows of machine stitching done with a twin needle. You could also do the edging by hand or make an embellished edging with a row or two of beads. Step 5:Trim the batting very close to the edge finishing. Turn under the extra fabric and pin or baste it in place. Trace the shape onto the suede and trim it about1⁄16 smaller all around. Use a glue stick to hold the suede in place on top of the batting. Do not use pins to hold synthetic suede because the holes may be permanent. Step 6:Stitch the suede to the edges of the piece. Use any neat stitch because it will not be seen when the piece is worn. This piece was done with a blind stitch with a seed bead included on every stitch. Step 7:Sew at least two large snaps onto the suede backing at the overlap and onto the corresponding fabric side. Be sure to try on the piece when you’re deciding where to place the snaps. You can try hook and loop fasten- ers but they’re usually too thick and cause a lumpy look.( Cheryl Jones is a retired chemist now experimenting with beads and fiber. Her husband, dog, and cat do not have beaded collars. She hangs out with other textile artists and is a volunteer at the Textile Center of Minnesota. Cheryl may be reached at cdjones1@attbi.com.

zero_2_0

Nov 9, 2017
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks