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A L TEX-beamer Course Katharina Hoff June 2, 2007 Contents A 1 Introduction to L TEX A 1.1 Literature Recommendations for L TEX . A 1.2 Obtaining L TEX for your own Computer A 1.2.1 L TEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.2 Text Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.3 Document Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 6 6 6 7 7 7 9 9 10 10 10 10
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  L A TEX- beamer Course Katharina Hoff June 2, 2007 Contents 1 Introduction to L A TEX1 1.1 Literature Recommendations for L A TEX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.2 Obtaining L A TEX for your own Computer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.2.1 L A TEX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.2.2 Text Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.2.3 Document Viewer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 Getting Started with L A TEX3 2.1 Document Structure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42.2 Text Formatting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42.3 Lists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42.4 Inserting Figures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62.5 Formatting Tables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62.5.1 Using the tabular Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62.5.2 Making your Table a float Object. . . . . . . . . . . . . 72.6 Mathematical Equations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72.7 Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72.8 Special Characters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92.9 Useful L A TEX Links. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3 The beamer Class10 3.1 Obtaining the beamer Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103.2 Literature recommendation for beamer class. . . . . . . . . . . 103.3 Using the beamer class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103.3.1 The beamer Preamble. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103.3.2 Structuring a Presentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103.3.3 Making Slides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123.3.4 Blocks & Columns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123.3.5 Step-by-step Uncovering and Overlays. . . . . . . . . . . 133.3.6 Creating Handouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1 Introduction to L A TEX L A TEX is a document preparation system for high quality typesetting. It providesan easy access to the powerful TEX language introduced byKnuth(1979). L A TEXcan be used to create almost any type of document, ranging from scientific1  arcticles to books and conference posters. This script gives an introduction onhow to create scientific presentations with L A TEX using the beamer -class. 1.1 Literature Recommendations for L A TEX This script gives only a very short summary on the most basic functions of L A TEX.If you are considering to use L A TEX in your daily life, I recommend you to geta book. One very complete and helpful example is The L A TEX Companion ,second edition, by Frank Mittelbach and Michel Goossens, Addison Wesley,2004, ISBN 0-201-36299-6. When I last checked, the price was 60 US$. Muchcheaper and much more compact, though in German, is L A TEX kurz & gut by Matthias Kalle Dahlheimer, O’Reilly, 1998. This book gives a very concisereference for the most important commands. 1.2 Obtaining L A TEX for your own Computer In order to use L A TEX on any computer, three parts need to be installed:1. L A TEX itself,2. a text editor and3. a document viewer. 1.2.1 L A TEX L A TEX (’Lamport’s TEX’(Lamport,1999)) is a macro-package that enables the user to ’translate’ text with markup-commands to a typesetted document. Thesystem requirements of L A TEX are comparably low and free distributions areavailable for almost any of today’s computer systems. These are links to thedistributions for three of the most commonly used platforms: ã Windows:http://miktex.org ã MacOS:http://www.tug.org/mactex ã Linux: teTeX is already contained in most Linux distributions.Having installed L A TEX on your system, you can now ’compile’ a *.tex file toe.g. *.dvi in the command line. Nowadays, many graphically embedded L A TEXenvironments are available as L A TEX-Editors. 1.2.2 Text Editor Any text editor may be used for editing a *.tex-file which may subsequentlybe compiled via the command line. However, graphically embedded L A TEX-environments are much more convenient for most users. They usually containa text-window where the source file is edited, several pop-up menus which offer– among other features – L A TEX command insertion, direct access to the L A TEX-documentation and buttons for source file compilation to several formats. Someuseful L A TEX-editors are: ã Windows: TeXnicCenterhttp://www.toolscenter.org2  ã MacOS: TeXShophttp://www.uoregon.edu/ koch/texshop ã KDE Linux: Kilehttp://kile.sourceforge.net 1.2.3 Document Viewer Natively, L A TEX compiles to dvi (device independent) file format. The *.dvi-filecontains a ’device-independent’ description of the text layout. dvi can be ac-cessed by so-called drivers, e.g. for document preview, but usually, the *.dvi-filewill be further converted to e.g. pdf or ps format. For document preview, advi-viewer will be needed (usually, either your system already contains a docu-ment viewer that is dvi-compatible, or your integrated L A TEX environment willbring one along). Just in case you realize that you are missing a dvi-viewer,Wikipedia links to several good dvi-viewers:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVI (file format).As mentioned above, dvi-files are usually converted to more popular fileformats post compilation. It is a good idea to have Acrobat Reader installed(http://www.adobe.com/de/products/acrobat) for viewing full functionality.pdf-files. GhostView (http://www.cs.wisc.edu/ ghost) provides access to *.ps-files (and *.pdf-files).A special version of L A TEX, pdflatex, compiles *.tex directly to *.pdf-files.The usage of pdflatex is particularly interesting if you want to include *.jpg or*.png files in your document (L A TEX natively only supports *.eps). 2 Getting Started with L A TEX L A TEX is a markup language which uses certain commands to indicate text for-matting for the compiler. The source-file of every L A TEX-document has thefile-ending *.tex. The article class , which is meant to format scientific arti-cles, will be used in order to introduce the main features of L A TEX. A typical*.tex file with the article class looks like this: \documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{article}%opening... % is the comment sign in LaTeX!\title{My First \LaTeX{}-document}\author{XXX}\begin{document}\maketitle % will create a title containing author, title and date\begin{abstract}Insert your abstract here!\end{abstract}\section{This could be the first main section-title}Insert the main text for your first section here!\end{document} 3  After giving this file a name with the ending *.tex, it may be compiled withL A TEX or pdflatex in the command line or via the compilation button of yourL A TEX editor. For various reasons, you should compile your document twice, orbetter three times before opening it. This is particularly important to get allreferences correctly counted. Command line: latex my.tex or pdflatex my.tex Important things to keep in mind when editing *.tex-files at all times:1. If you \ begin something (e.g. the document, or a figure, or a table), thenyou also have to \ end it before the document ends.2. Pay attention which type of brackets you are using!3. % is the sign for a ’comment’ which means that everything following thissign will be ignored by L A TEX. 2.1 Document Structure L A TEX offers structuring commands which facilitate giving your document alogical structure. The article class supports in hierarchic order: \part{Headline of your part}\section{Headline of your section}\subsection{}\subsubsection{}\paragraph{}\subparagraph{} A structure command does not only format your headline with the appro-priate font-size and weight, but also gives a heading number that reflects thehierarchic order, stores the headline for the table of contents (and if enabled forheader or footer of the current page).The table of contents will be produced by the \ tableofcontents command(see figure1on page5). 2.2 Text Formatting Normal Text\textit{Italic Text}\textbf{Bold Text}\textsc{Yet another format} Normal Text Italic Text  Bold Text Yet another format 2.3 Lists The \ itemize environment will present every \ item of a list after a globallyspecified symbol (mostly a black dot by default) or after a symbol or word givenin edgy brackets:4
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