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Berry Forte & Journal Music Theory JMT 2006

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David Carson Berry, “Journal of Music Theory under Allen Forte’s Editorship,” Journal of Music Theory 50/1 (2006): 7–23. ã ABSTRACT ã This article addresses the role played by Allen Forte in establishing the Journal of Music Theory as a journal of record for the American discipline of music theory, as it emerged and evolved in the 1960s. The journal was founded at Yale University in 1957 by editor David Kraehenbuehl. When he left his position at both the university and the journal in 1960, the e
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   David Carson Berry, “  Journal of Music Theory under Allen Forte’s Editorship,”   Journal of Music Theory 50/1 (2006): 7–23. ã A BSTRACT ã This article addresses the role played by Allen Forte in establishing the  Journal of Music Theory  as a journal of record for the American discipline of music theory, as it emerged and evolved inthe 1960s. The journal was founded at Yale University in 1957 by editor David Kraehenbuehl.When he left his position at both the university and the journal in 1960, the editorship passed toAllen Forte, who functioned in that capacity for the next seven years, making him not only thelongest-serving editor in the journal’s history, but also one at an especially crucial period, whenconceptions of the field were beginning to crystallize and circulate in the forms recognizabletoday. This article explores, in turn, the path Forte took to the journal (and Yale); aspects of editorship, design, and production during his time; the personal imprint he made on the journal,in terms of his editorial agenda; and his departure from the editorship and the legacy he left behind. Quotations from the author’s interviews with Forte are included.    N OTE ON THE ARTICLE , FROM D ANIEL H ARRISON , “I NTRODUCTION TO THE I SSUE ,”  J  OURNAL OF   M  USIC  T   HEORY    50/1 (2006), 3–4: “For this fiftieth anniversary issue, we publish two methodologically unusual articles that treatthe history of the journal—and, by extension, the discipline—from very different angles. Relyingon interviews with Allen Forte and others, David Carson Berry creates a rich history of   JMT  ’searly years, when the journal was composed on a typewriter and laid out on a dining-room tablein the editor’s apartment. While Berry’s account highlights people and places, Yosef Goldenberg’s article examines the products, undertaking a bibliometric study of the articlecontent of the first forty-eight volumes. The result is, in essence, a meta-analytical study of thediscipline of music theory based on what  JMT  has published over the years. In their respectivehistorical and analytical interests, both articles enact the kind of inquiry that has drawn many tomusic theory in the first place” (p. 3).    E RRATUM   On p. 18, in the final sentence of the paragraph that continues from the prior page, there is aredundant citation. The sentence should have omitted the first and retained the second, as shown below (with the strikethrough indicating the required deletion):In that same issue, Forte’s student Teitelbaum published the article “IntervallicRelations in Atonal Music” (1965) that was indebted to Forte’s work, and in factstemmed from a master’s thesis (Teitelbaum 1964) of the same title that he hadcompleted at Yale the prior year (Teitelbaum 1964).  7  Journal of Music Theory  50:1, Spig 2006DOI 10.1215/00222909-2008-004 © 2008 by Ya Uivsiy   Journal of Music Theory   ud A Fo’s Ediosip David Carson Berry Abstract This article addresses the role played by Allen Forte in establishing the Journal of Music Theory  as ajournal of record for the American discipline of music theory, as it emerged and evolved in the 1960s. The journalwas founded at Yale University in 1957 by editor David Kraehenbuehl. When he left his position at both the uni-versity and the journal in 1960, the editorship passed to Allen Forte, who functioned in that capacity for the nextseven years, making him not only the longest-serving editor in the journal’s history, but also one at an especiallycrucial period, when conceptions of the field were beginning to crystallize and circulate in the forms recognizabletoday. This article explores, in turn, the path Forte took to the journal (and Yale); aspects of editorship, design,and production during his time; the personal imprint he made on the journal, in terms of his editorial agenda;and his departure from the editorship and the legacy he left behind. Quotations from the author’s interviews withForte are included. when the Journal of Music Theory  dbud i  spig of 1957, foud-ig dio David Kabu (1923–97) aspid o va musi oy byod is ompoay saus as a “didai ovi.” I  foodo  fis issu,  aoud a  soug oig ss a is “soa-io . . . [o] a mod of aiv oug” ( Kabu 1957a, 1 ). 1 Basd a  Ya Soo of Musi,  JMT  as o sv as a aays fo is aissaby offig a og-ovdu foum fo “os isoad aiv oiss oav odd o ad  i b a.” “T aios of musi ois [] i d of a sag”—a “ssay simua” fo “o-ia disovy”—ad   joua as idd o povid o. 2 Ov ous of sv smiaua issus, Kabu os o  agby pubisig y-o ais o a vaiy of oia issus, 3 ay as 1 Kraehenbuehl’s use of the word creative  as a descriptionof music theory’s mode of thought is distinctive. In additionto the use quoted in the main text, he employs the wordthree more times (“a creative music theory,” “creative theo-rists,” and “the creations of the music theorist”). 2 In the interim between the first and second issues, Krae-henbuehl was surprised to find that articles had been sub-mitted mainly “by musicologists, not theorists or compos-ers,” and that two-thirds of the subscribers were also of theformer (rather than the latter) group. He took this as proofthat, heretofore, theorists had “found little encouragementto express themselves creatively in their vocation,” as hephrased it in an editorial, “A Matter of Policy,” in the journal’ssecond issue (Kraehenbuehl 1957b, 125). 3 One of this number was in two parts: Hans Lenneberg,“Johann Mattheson on Affect and Rhetoric in Music,” part 1,  8  JOUrAl   of    MUSIc TEOrY  may is i a “oy foum,” ddiad o idas a did o aa afu-g ai, o spia-opis foums (o o oia aiig ad o o  pofssioa musi ois), a bibiogapy of “musi oy i asaio,” ad vis of som fify books.T, i 1960, Kabu uxpdy f is posiio as a y ud assoia pofsso a Ya, ad i i is diosip of  joua. 4   as sudd by A Fo (b. 1926), o oud fuio i a apa-iy fo sv yas, makig im o oy  ogs-svig dio i  joua’s isoy, 5 bu somo o svd a a spiay uia piod,  opios of  fid  bgiig o ysaiz ad iua i foms ogizab o us oday. T piod of Fo’s diosip ad isad isois a  fous of  ps ssay, i ppaaio fo i Iodud o ivis i im. 6 I  fooig, I i fis xpo pa Fo ook o  joua (ad Ya); u o asps of diosip, dsig,ad poduio duig is im; xami  psoa impi  mad o joua i ms of is dioia agda; ad asy osid is dpaufom  diosip ad  gay  f bid. The Path to JMT  (and Yale) Fo as aiy a mmb of  goup Kabu ad i mid  ddiad  JMT  o aiv oiss o okd i isoaio i pod-ig  abous of kidd spiis. Af big disagd fom  avy fooig Wod Wa II, Fo movd o  Yok ciy,   vuay avaid imsf of  G.I. Bi o pay fo om a coumbia Uiv-siy. T, i okig oad a udgadua musi dg,  sud-id omposiio, fis i Oo luig ad a i Vadimi Ussavsky. Aoug  oiud omposiio sudis a  gadua v ad ddo assoia maiy i omposs i a  soo,  as a  f “ay qui ao” i is iss, i  did mo oad o-ia ad aayia idas a omposig. is pa as aypia fo apiod i i “ as vy i aiviy” i musi oy ad, o av JMT  2/1 (1958): 47–84; and part 2, JMT  2/2 (1958): 193–236.Several articles focused on historical studies, includingtranslations of texts. It should be noted that, early on, Krae-henbuehl expressed concern that there might emerge animbalance between articles on “the historical aspect of oursubject [i.e., theory]” and those of interest to “contempo-rary theorists and composers,” and he suggested greatersupport for the latter (1957b, 125). 4 For a brief discussion of why Kraehenbuehl left Yale (ini-tially to work with young students at the New School forMusic Study, which he cofounded in Princeton, New Jer-sey), see Burkhart 1997. 5 The record is tied on this front: Martha M. Hyde alsoserved as editor for fourteen semiannual issues, from 25/1(spring 1981) through 31/2 (fall 1987). 6 All quotations, unless otherwise attributed, come fromthese interviews. The first (and more lengthy) interview wasconducted in person, at Forte’s home in Hamden, Connecti-cut, on June 28, 2006; the second was conducted by phoneon October 8, 2006.

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