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Prentice Hall. All-in-One Workbook. Grade 6. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey Boston, Massachusetts Chandler, Arizona Glenview, Illinois

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Prentice Hall WritinG COACH All-in-One Workbook Grade 6 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey Boston, Massachusetts Chandler, Arizona Glenview, Illinois Printed in the United States of America. This publication
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Prentice Hall WritinG COACH All-in-One Workbook Grade 6 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey Boston, Massachusetts Chandler, Arizona Glenview, Illinois Printed in the United States of America. This publication is protected by copyright, and permission should be obtained from the publisher prior to any prohibited reproduction, storage in a retrieval system, or transmission in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or likewise. The publisher hereby grants permission to reproduce these pages, in part or in whole, for classroom use only, the number not to exceed the number of students in each class. Notice of copyright must appear on all copies. For information regarding permissions, write to Rights Management & Contracts, Pearson Education, Inc., One Lake Street, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey Pearson, Prentice Hall, and Pearson Prentice Hall are trademarks, in the U.S. and/or other countries, of Pearson Education, Inc., or its affiliates. ISBN-13: ISBN-10: V TABLE OF CONTENTS Part 1 Introduction... 1A Grammar Chapter 13: Nouns and Pronouns Nouns... 1 Pronouns... 7 Chapter 14: Verbs Action Verbs Linking Verbs Helping Verbs Chapter 15: Adjectives and Adverbs Adjectives Adverbs Chapter 16: Prepositions Prepositions Chapter 17: Conjunctions and Interjections Conjunctions Interjections: Chapter 18: Basic Sentence Parts The Basic Sentence Complete Subjects and Predicates Compound Subjects and Compound Verbs Hard-to-Find Subjects Objects and Complements Chapter 19: Phrases and Clauses Phrases Clauses Chapter 20: Effective Sentences Classifying Sentences by Structure Classifying the Four Functions of a Sentence Combining Sentences Varying Sentences Avoiding Sentence Fragments Copyright Pearson Education, Inc., or its affiliates. All rights reserved. iii Usage Chapter 21: Using Verbs Using Regular Verbs The Six Tenses of Verbs Troublesome Verbs Chapter 22: Using Pronouns Recognizing Cases of Personal Pronouns Chapter 23: Making Words Agree Subject-Verb Agreement Agreement Between Pronouns and Antecedents Chapter 24: Using Modifiers Comparisons Using Adjectives and Adverbs Troublesome Adjectives and Adverbs Mechanics Chapter 25: Punctuation End Marks Commas Semicolons and Colons Quotation Marks, Underlining, and Italics Hyphens Apostrophes Parentheses and Brackets Ellipses and Dashes Chapter 26: Capitalization Using Capitalization Part 2 Introduction and Contents Vocabulary and Spelling Practice Part 3 Introduction and Contents Academic and Workplace Skills Activities Copyright Pearson Education, Inc., or its affiliates. All rights reserved. iv Part 1: Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics INTRODUCTION Part 1 of the All-in-One Workbook consists of worksheets that provide additional support for the skills learned in the grammar chapters of Prentice Hall Writing Coach. Each worksheet provides students with instruction on a grammar skill. The worksheets then provide two practice activities on the skill as well as a speaking and writing activity. The extra practice provided in these worksheets focuses on the following areas: Grammar: These worksheets provide students with practice learning how to identify and use nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections. They also help students identify basic sentence parts as well as phrases and clauses. Usage: These worksheets provide practice with using verbs and pronouns, making words agree, and using modifiers. Mechanics: These worksheets give students practice with proper use of punctuation and capitalization in their sentences. Copyright Pearson Education, Inc., or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 1A 1 PEOPLE, PLACES, THINGS, AND IDEAS A noun names something. There are different types of nouns. See the examples below. People Places Things Ideas Joe, sister, skateboarder, Senator Smith home, school, Chestnut Street, Earth music, tree, shelf, The Hobbit tolerance, pride, sneakiness, disappointment Practice A Identifying Nouns Read each sentence. Then, underline the nouns in each sentence. Example: Amira went to Austin last week. Answer: Amira went to Austin last week. 1. Luna is a smart cat. 2. My brother plays the guitar. 3. Chris eats blueberries every day. 4. The doctor said her courage is amazing. 5. Cedric moved to Texas from Vermont. 6. What gift are you giving your mother for her birthday? 7. The Revolutionary War was fought for freedom. 8. His favorite book is Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. 9. A method of landscaping that conserves water is called xeriscaping. 10. My uncle has no sense of humor. Practice B Labeling Nouns Read each sentence. Then, on the line provided, identify whether each underlined noun is a person, place, thing, or idea. Example: Eric kicked the soccer ball. Answer: Eric person; ball thing 1. Carlos lives on Market Street. 2. I can feel the excitement in the air. 3. Her eyes sparkled like gems. 4. Rosa is the video game champ of our house. 5. Your friendship matters to Ben and me. 6. Rover got lost in the park. 7. Have you seen the painting Starry Night by van Gogh? 8. Jan looked at her watch and wished she were home. 9. Resilience is the ability to bounce back from problems. 10. The president gave the award to Joey and Deb. Write a two-sentence description of your favorite place, using at least four nouns. Circle the nouns. Then, take turns reading your sentences with a partner. Your partner should listen for and name the nouns you used. Switch roles with your partner. 1 Nouns and Pronouns 2 CONCRETE AND ABSTRACT NOUNS A concrete noun names something that can be recognized through any of the five senses. An abstract noun names something that cannot be recognized through the senses. Concrete nouns name people, places, and things. Abstract nouns name ideas. See the examples below. Concrete nouns Abstract nouns Sara, friend, airport, Galveston Bay, desk, taco, highway friendship, kindness, cruelty, suspense, guilt, love Practice A Identifying Concrete and Abstract Nouns Read each sentence. Then, underline the concrete nouns and circle the abstract nouns. Example: Jules never forgot the stranger s kindness. Answer: Jules never forgot the stranger s kindness. 1. The cruelty of bullfighting is hard to deny. 2. Rafe felt surprise when Cary spoke up. 3. Jill is known for her bravery. 4. A poet said, Beauty is truth, truth beauty. 5. My mom doesn t like cats, but she feels affection for Dot. 6. My dad says rush-hour traffic causes frustration. 7. Gid felt a spark of envy when he saw his friend s new television. 8. Da Vinci, a true artist, could find inspiration anywhere. 9. The truth of Maria s claim was never in doubt. 10. Seeing Yasmin cross the finish line gave Jim a shock. Practice B Labeling Concrete and Abstract Nouns Read each sentence. Then, on the line provided, identify whether each underlined noun is concrete or abstract. Example: Happiness arrives when you re not looking. Answer: abstract 1. His goal in life is simplicity. 2. Her thoughtfulness to her friends is appreciated. 3. Do you think animals feel regret? 4. Lawrence has a passion for acting. 5. George s stubbornness will get him into trouble someday. 6. When Claude begins to feel anger, he counts to ten. 7. My dad feels compassion toward all small creatures. 8 Living on the river gives excitement to our days. 9. My intention is to become a more outgoing person. 10. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Write a two-sentence description of someone you know, using at least three abstract nouns. Circle the nouns. Then, take turns reading your sentences with a partner. Your partner should listen for and name the abstract nouns you used. Switch roles with your partner. 2 Nouns and Pronouns 3 COLLECTIVE NOUNS A collective noun names a group of people or things. Examples of collective nouns are audience, crowd, couple, and family. Practice A Finding Collective Nouns Read each group of nouns. On the line provided, write the word in each group that is a collective noun. Example: herd, animals, deer Answer: herd 1. fans, audience, viewers 2. father, sister, family 3. group, members, friends 4. network, signal, subscribers 5. singer, band, piano player 6. committee, workers, plan 7. point guard, team, rebounder 8. litter, kittens, mother 9. voters, citizens, public 10. vermin, mice, bugs Practice B Identifying Collective Nouns Read each sentence. Then, underline each collective noun. Example: The audience applauded after the performance. Answer: The audience applauded after the performance. 1. A firefighter spoke to my class about safety. 2. The jury could not agree on a verdict. 3. The chess club meets every Friday in the quad. 4. My sister s team is selling cookies. 5. A flock of sparrows flew over our heads. 6. The board of directors voted to increase salaries. 7. A crowd gathered to watch the puppet show. 8. The committee set a date for the spring dance. 9. A school of fish swam away from the divers. 10. All kinds of vermin were living in the abandoned building. Write a two-sentence description of a group of animals, using at least two collective nouns. Circle the nouns. Then, take turns reading your sentences with a partner. Your partner should listen for and name the collective nouns you used. 3 Nouns and Pronouns 4 COUNT AND NON-COUNT NOUNS Count nouns name things that can be counted. Non-count nouns name things that cannot be counted. Count nouns take an article (a, an, or the) and can be either singular or plural. Non-count nouns do not take a or an and cannot be plural. See the examples below. Count nouns Non-count nouns a pencil, an eyebrow, the books, two parties equipment, fun, knowledge, water, wheat Show that you can use and understand the function of non-count nouns by completing the following exercises. Practice A Identifying Non-count Nouns Read each sentence. Then, underline the non-count nouns. Example: My parents are buying new furniture for the family room. Answer: My parents are buying new furniture for the family room. 1. When lightning struck, the tree split in two. 2. My brother plays football at college. 3. The heat from the fire is beginning to warm me. 4. Dad added too much sugar to the cake. 5. The twins always feel excitement the first day of school. 6. Lenny cooked pasta for dinner last night. 7. Jo doesn t have enough information to make a choice. 8. I saw steam rise from the iron. 9. Pollution makes the air hard to breathe. 10. Kate picked tomatoes and lettuce in the garden. Practice B Writing With Count and Non-count Nouns Read each sentence. Then, rewrite each on the line provided, correcting the use of the non-count noun. Example: Our company provides equipments for the sports teams. Answer: Our company provides equipment for the sports teams. 1. I enjoy watching a snow from indoors. 2. Natalie got her hairs cut short. 3. Luis listens to a music while he studies. 4. Add a flour to thicken the batter. 5. Sunshines always improves my mood. 6. All of Tom s favorite meals start with a rice. 7. A curiosity is a useful trait. 8. Pele listens to songs while watching soccers. 9. Sue is waiting for the mails to come. 10. Kamal lettered in a basketball last year. Write a two-sentence description of preparing a meal (or one dish), using at least three non-count nouns. Then, take turns reading your sentences with a partner. Your partner should listen for and name the non-count nouns you used. 4 Nouns and Pronouns 5 RECOGNIZING COMPOUND NOUNS A compound noun is one noun made by joining two or more words. Compound nouns can be single words, hyphenated words, or two or more separate words. Single word Hyphenated word Separate words football, backpack, blueberry, toothbrush brother-in-law, kilowatt-hour, penny-pincher, runner-up dust jacket, ice cream, dining room, West Virginia Practice A Identifying Compound Nouns Read each sentence. Then, write the compound nouns on the lines provided. Some sentences have more than one compound noun. Draw a line between the words that make up each compound noun. Example: The bookmark fell out of the novel I m reading. Answer: book mark 1. Tony baked a blackberry pie. 2. The president-elect made an inspiring speech about her plans. 6. The pilot landed on the aircraft carrier s flight deck. 7. Les and Bev are co-owners of the go-cart. 3. Becky s favorite wildflower is the bluebell. 8. We planted a blue spruce in the backyard. 4. My mom doesn t allow grape juice in the living room. 9. Frank went fly-fishing with his grandfather. 5. My great-grandmother settled in the Texas backcountry in Citizen journalism involves people covering the news in their hometowns. Practice B Writing With Compound Nouns Read each sentence. Then, rewrite each, replacing the underlined words with compound nouns. Example: Tori put her books in her bag. Answer: Tori put her books in her backpack. 1. The people who put out flames saved a burning house. 2. Mom had a pain in her temples, so she took a nap. 3. The place where they pitched their tent turned out to be rocky. 4. We usually watch TV in the place where family members gather in the evening. 5. Phil didn t win first prize; he was the person who won second prize. Write a two-sentence description of a typical weekend event for you, using at least four compound nouns. Circle the nouns. Then, take turns reading your sentences with a partner. Your partner should listen for and name the compound nouns you used. 5 Nouns and Pronouns 6 USING COMMON AND PROPER NOUNS A common noun names any one of a class of people, places, things, or ideas. A proper noun names a specific person, place, thing, or idea. Common nouns are not capitalized (except at the start of a sentence or in a title). Proper nouns are always capitalized. Common nouns Proper nouns boy, river, state, movie, language, project Sam, Red River, Texas, Shrek, English, Toys for Tots Practice A Identifying Common and Proper Nouns Read each sentence. Then, underline the common nouns and circle the proper nouns. Example: My best friend is named Marta. Answer: My best friend is named Marta. 1. We walked to the park, crossing Elm Street and heading up the hill. 2. Mary Cassatt was a well-known painter of the nineteenth century. 3. My favorite poem is The Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti. 4. My younger sister, Lori, named our new cat Rowan. 5. The first pilot to fly across the Atlantic Ocean alone was Charles Lindbergh. 6. The book Biomimicry talks about products inspired by nature, like Velcro. 7. When he was president, Theodore Roosevelt started the system of national parks. 8. Some of the oldest books in the world were written in Sumer, in the Middle East. 9. Missy s favorite singer, Taylor Swift, has a new record out. 10. The history of Texas and the entire Southwest is filled with interesting people. Practice B Writing With Common and Proper Nouns Read each sentence. Then, rewrite each sentence, replacing the underlined words with proper nouns. Example: Deb and her friend swam in the lake. Answer: Deb and Bea swam in Sunset Lake. 1. The neighbors went to a European country last year. 2. We drove down the highway to a city. 3. I go to the museum to see the paintings. 4. Ken and his buddy planted tulips last fall. 5. Ana ran into her coach at the grocery store. 6. Chris played a role in a musical. 7. Jan sailed an ocean last summer. 8. Eric learned a new language before he traveled to a far-off country. Write a three-sentence description of a foreign country, using at least three common and two proper nouns. Circle the nouns. Then, take turns reading your sentences with a partner. Your partner should listen for and name the proper nouns you used. Switch roles with your partner. 6 Nouns and Pronouns 7 ANTECEDENTS OF PRONOUNS A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun or a group of words acting as a noun. An antecedent is the noun (or group of words acting as a noun) to which a pronoun refers. EXAMPLES: Chaz smiled when he opened his birthday present. antecedent pronoun Protecting wildlife is a mission for Jane. She works on it after school and on weekends. antecedent antecedent pronoun pronoun Practice A Identifying Antecedents Read each sentence or set of sentences. Then, write each pronoun and its antecedent. Example: Nate dropped his backpack. It landed on his foot. Answer: his, his Nate; It backpack 1. Maria lent Bridget her CD of Celtic music. 2. Deciduous trees lose their leaves in the fall. 3. When Brad and Amy had a war of words, he lost. 4. Carlos was happy because he scored the winning touchdown. 5. Roscoe jumped into his owner s lap. He was tired after his long walk. 6. Swimming is Diana s favorite sport. She does it every day. 7. Robert says he likes to watch the birds and see where they nest. 8. Eddie s cat had her kittens. He was surprised that they were so small. Practice B Writing Pronouns for Antecedents Read each sentence. Then, fill in the blank with the appropriate pronoun. Example: Austin is known for music scene. Answer: Austin is known for its music scene. 1. Sherry loved the necklace her folks gave. 2. When the light burned out, made a buzzing noise. 3. I like sweet potatoes due in part to texture. 4. Did you remember wallet? 5. Larry forgot to set alarm. 6. Don t be afraid of bats; eat hundreds of mosquitoes. 7. After Molly got her license, drove me to the mall. 8. When the comet passed, I saw tail. 9. When the rain started, made quite a noise on the tin roof. 10. Have you read the Ember books? are real page-turners. Write a three-sentence description of a famous person, using at least five pronouns. Then, take turns reading your sentences with a partner. Your partner should listen for and identify the pronouns antecedents. Switch roles with your partner. 7 Nouns and Pronouns 8 RECOGNIZING PERSONAL PRONOUNS Personal pronouns refer to (1) the person speaking or writing, (2) the person listening or reading, or (3) the topic (person, place, thing, or idea) being discussed or written about. Singular Plural Subjective I, you, he, she, it we, you, they Objective me, you, him, her, it us, you, them Possessive my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its our, ours, your, yours, their, theirs Practice A Identifying Personal Pronouns Read each sentence. Then, write each personal pronoun. Most sentences have more than one pronoun. Example: She waved to her neighbors. Answer: she; her 1. He took his dog for a walk. 2. We went shopping with our family. 6. They boarded up their house and moved away. 7. I told her to go ahead with her plans. 3. This book is mine; that one s yours. 8. Do you think they will come back next year? 4. Give us a call when you get back to town. 5. My mom went to her high school reunion last week. 9. He chose to go skating, and she chose to go swimming. 10. Lola laughed as she showed us her gymnastics routine. Practice B Choosing Personal Pronouns Read each sentence. Then, choose the appropriate pronoun from the two in parentheses and write it on the line provided. Example: (We, Us) decided to hold a fundraiser. Answer: We 1. That barrette belongs to (I, me). 2. (They, Them) helped with the gardening. 3. Is that (your, yours) MP3 player on the desk? 4. The idea to decorate the gym was (their, theirs). 5. Please send (he, him) your suggestions. 6. The extra ticket is (our, ours). 7. (He, Him) fixed sandwiches for everybody. 8. Jim and (I, me) made garlands out of glow lights. 9. He thinks the stars come out just for (her, hers). 10. Kim and (she, her) both won awards for their debating skills. Write a three-sentence description of something you ve done recently, using at least five personal pronouns. Then, take turns reading your sentences with a partner. Your partner should listen for and identify the pronouns. Switch roles with your partner. 8 Nouns and Pronouns 9 REFLEXIVE AND INTENSIVE PRONOUNS A reflexive pronoun directs the action of the verb toward its subject. Reflexive pronouns point to a noun or pronoun earlier in the sentence. An intensive pronoun simply adds
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