Graphics & Design

Research into the Careers, Lives, and Well-Being of Women Coaches

Description
Research into the Careers, Lives, and Well-Being of Women Coaches Dr Leanne Norman Carnegie Research Institute of Sport, Physical Activity, and Leisure Session Overview Project background The team Background
Published
of 21
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
Research into the Careers, Lives, and Well-Being of Women Coaches Dr Leanne Norman Carnegie Research Institute of Sport, Physical Activity, and Leisure Session Overview Project background The team Background research The study Project findings Stage 1 Stage 2 Development of Stage 3 Practical guidance and solutions Q&A Professor Anne Flintoff Research team Dr Leanne Norman Principal Investigator (project lead) The Team Dr Faye Didymus Psychologist (for stage 1) Dr Paul Widdop Statistician (for stage 1) Alexandra (AJ) Rankin Research assistant Stage 2 SCUK Supportive partners Marina McGoldrick Business coach (Ord Consultants) Workshop leader stage 3 Nicky Chapman Research assistant Stage 2 Project Background: Previous Research on Well-being What is your understanding of psychological well-being (PWB)? PWB is the affective and purposive psychological state that people experience while they are at work. Whether people feel good or not. Whether people feel that their work is meaningful and has a purpose. PWB is linked to success. Project Background: Previous Research PWB is linked to success and physical health. PWB should be a strategic priority for governing bodies and organisations. A healthy coach is a higher performing coach. Project Background: Previous Research Women in Coaching What do you think are some of the experiences of women as coaches? Project Background: Previous Research What the research says: Personal experiences: - Working harder to prove oneself (linked to association of masculinity with authority) - Marginalised and trivialised - Undervalued - Significance of gendered relations - Centrality of perception of a clear development pathway - Importance of receiving feedback (e.g. networks and mentors) - Feelings of intimidation and isolation - Importance of positive work relationships Structural experiences (working practices): - Heavy workloads (working in a blended, under-resourced profession) - Lack of opportunities - Informal appointment processes - Lack of support to progress to higher coaching qualifications - Inaccessible coaching qualifications - Organisational structures vary in support - Centrality of organisational values - Significance of having kudos as a former player of the sport Project Background: The Study Stage 1 Stage 2 Funding from Leeds Beckett University s research cluster funding: ~ 28,500 Stage 3 Project Background: Stage 1 Purpose: Further understanding of the occupational health and well-being of women sports coaches. Sampling: An online questionnaire was disseminated to coaches via NGBs, social media, and . Participants: 218 women coaches (M age = 33.3 years) representing various sports and full-time, part-time, zero hours, and volunteer positions. Project Background: Stage 1 Data collection: The Shortened Stress Evaluation Tool (ASSET; Cartwright & Cooper, 2007), which is a valid and reliable measure of physical health, psychological well-being, and organisational commitment. Four subsections: Biographical and demographical information Perceptions of the job role Attitude toward the organisation Physical health Data analysis: Descriptive statistics Factor analyses Multiple regression models Project Background: Stage 1 The ASSET survey Example questions: I do not feel I am informed about what is going on in this organisation I feel valued and trusted by the organisation Project Background: Stage 2 Purpose: - To understand the different experiences of women as coaches in order to understand what facilitates and hinders transitions at the different stages of their careers and lives. These pathways were considered as an interplay of not only individual choices and circumstances, but also related to organisational context and practices. Sampling and Participants 4 head coaches 4 Head coaches 4 Head coaches 4 Head coaches Project Background: Stage 3 Purpose: - One day exclusive development day for women head coaches, focusing upon: Personal well-being Managing Relationships Influencing Change Set-up: To be run by Marina McGoldrick, business coach and consultant (Ord Consultants) and held at Carnegie Stadium, Leeds (home of Leeds Rhinos) Martial Status Education Level Project Findings: Stage 1 Single Socio-demographic Details Married or Co-Habiting Separated, Widowed, or Divorced Degree + Level 3 Level 1 and 2 Other or no Qualifications Age Coaching Role Head Coach Ethnicity White British or Irish Assistant Coach Performance Director and other Player-Coach or Manager Other White Non-white (e.g., Indian, Pakistani, Mixed Race) Psychological wellbeing Sense of purpose Control Resources and communication Workload Work-life balance Job Security Work relationships Strain on phy health Strain on psy health Engagement Commitment to Org Project Findings: Stage 1 Psy wellbeing Sense of Purpose Control Res and Comms Workload Work-life Balance Job Security Work Relationships Strain on Phy Health Strain on Psy Health Engagement Commitment to Org R Durbin_Watson Project Findings: Stage 1 Summary of the findings: Work relationships appear to be important for women coaches. Resources and communication are related to perceptions of control. Many coaches reported low physical activity levels will impact psych. health and phys. health Strain on psychological health is related to strain on physical health and vice versa. Commitment to the organisation influences engagement while at work. Project Findings: Stage 2 Support the findings of stage 1 Most of the coaches are close to burn-out Shared sense of purpose & commitment to their role. Intrinsically motivated Bearing the burden of doubt: Working to prove themselves Overwhelming burden & demands of the role Subtlety of barriers The importance of positive relationships Numerous incidents of sexist treatment Working conditions are worse for older women coaches Project Findings: Stage 3 Practical Guidance Your ideas What do the findings mean for you? How would you use the findings or use research into well-being? If well-being was a strategic priority for your NGB, what would it look like? Top tips for moving forward: Include well-being as a strategic priority. There needs to be a limit to a coach s job What are your organisational values? Integrate support networks and mentors. Review resources and communication. Session Summary Project background The team Background research The study Project findings Stage 1 Stage 2 Development of Stage 3 Practical guidance and solutions Q&A
Search
Similar documents
View more...
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks