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A correlational study o f the relationship between a firm's intangible resources and its sustainable competitive advantage A dissertation presented by

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A correlational study o f the relationship between a firm's intangible resources and its sustainable competitive advantage A dissertation presented by
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  A correlational study of the relationship between a firm’s   intangible resources and its sustainable competitive advantage A dissertation presented by Mabel SohSubmitted to the Graduate School of Education and Human Development of The George Washington University, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF EDUCATION INHUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENTDissertation Committee:Dr. Michael Marquardt, Chair Dr. Charles Appleby Dr. Marilyn Wesner May 22nd, 2005 Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.  UMI Number: 3161598Copyright 2005 by Soh, Mabel All rights reserved.INFORMATION TO USERSThe quality of this reproduction is dependent upon the quality of the copy submitted. Broken or indistinct print, colored or poor quality illustrations and photographs, print bleed-through, substandard margins, and improper alignment can adversely affect reproduction.In the unlikely event that the author did not send a complete manuscript and there are missing pages, these will be noted. Also, if unauthorized copyright material had to be removed, a note will indicate the deletion. ® UMI UMI Microform 3161598 Copyright 2005 by ProQuest Information and Learning Company.  All rights reserved. This microform edition is protected against unauthorized copying under Title 17, United States Code.ProQuest Information and Learning Company 300 North Zeeb Road P.O. Box 1346  Ann Arbor, Ml 48106-1346 Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.  1ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSI believe in serendipity and the timing of God’s hand in our lives.In March 2002,1was privileged to have met Professor Michael Marquardt, my Chair, in Singapore. I thank him and am grateful to him for his kindness, wisdom, insights, guidance, encouragement and time. I thank my two dissertation committee members, Dr. Charles Appleby and Dr. Marilyn Wesner, who have been most generous with their time, effort, encouragement and big hearted support. I would also like to thank Dr. Harry Tunis and Dr. Mary Broad for their time, interest and participation.I would like to thank the GWU professors who have, in their own special ways, contributed to the development of my dissertation proposal right from its early stages: Professor David Schwandt, Professor Andrea Casey and Professor Clyde Croswell.I would like to thank the library staff at the Singapore Institute of Management (SIM) and the GWU Virginia campus library. Their responsiveness, effort and assistance have made it possible for me to complete this dissertation in such a timely manner.I would like to thank my friends: Taebok Lee and Choi Myoung Sook who have  been generous in sharing their knowledge and understanding; Ellen Goldman and Dianne Spears, who have given me their invaluable friendship and emotional support over the last 3 years; and, Grace Taylor for her kindness during my final examinations.Finally, I want to thank my family. They have always been there for me, in spite of my many absences attending classes, writing papers or studying for my exams. They have never wavered in their understanding, love, support and sacrifice. I dedicate my dissertation to my late father, my mother, my husband and my three wonderful children. I hope that they too will one day discover that learning is a truly enjoyable lifelong journey. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.  2ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION A correlational study of the relationship between a firm’s intangible resources and itssustainable competitive advantage This quantitative research tests the theory of the resource-based view (RBV) of strategy which predicts that the more intangible resources a firm has, the greater the sustainability of its competitive advantage. The research question to test this prediction is a non-directional hypothesis: Is there a relationship between the degree of intangible resources that a firm has and its ability to sustain its competitive advantage? Reputation quotient (RQ) and brand value (BV) are used to measure intangible resources, and the firm’s return on assets (ROA) is used to measure sustainable competitive advantage. This is a four-year longitudinal and observational study using published data.The results of this study reveal that brand value is a good predictor for a firm’s return on assets. A firm’s market capitalization (MKTCAP) has a moderating effect on the relationship between its reputation quotient and its return on assets but it does not have a moderating effect on the relationship between its brand value and its return on assets. The results reveal that the industry (IND) a firm is in has predictive utility for its return on assets, and that both a firm’s reputation quotient and its brand value are moderated by the type of industry that a firm is in.“Resource-based logic suggests that socially complex resources and capabilities should be among the most important sources of sustained competitive advantage for firms” (Barney & Arikan, 2001, p. 173). Human resources are examples of socially complex resources. In order to validate the results of this study, future research can include a study on the behavioral effects of a firm’s HR practices and its brand value. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.  3TABLE OF CONTENTS List of tables 5List of figures 8 Chapter 1- Introduction 10Chapter 2 - Review of the literature 32Chapter 3 - Methodology 63Chapter 4 - Results 84Chapter 5 - Interpretations, Conclusions, and Recommendations 128Appendices - Appendix 1- Theoretical constructs and variables 170Appendix 2(a) - Comparison of profitability: net profit,return on assets and brand value 171Appendix 2(b) - Top global companies,market capitalization & brand values 172Appendix 3 - Table 1- 2003 Top 35 Companies’ Datain Descending RQ Order 173Table 2 - 2002 Top 35 Companies’ Datain Descending RQ Order 174Table 3- 2001 Top 35 Companies’ Datain Descending RQ Order 175Table 4- 2000 Top 35 Companies’ Datain Descending RQ Order 176Table 5- 2003 Top 61 Companies’ Data inDescending BY Order 177 Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
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