Documents

A Merchandising Top Ten List

Description
A MERCHANDISING TOP TEN LIST – BEST PRACTICES MADE SIMPLE Tips By Merchandising Guru Ali Levy, Alijlevy@gmail.com 1. Reading is Fundamental! If you haven’t read “Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping” by Paco Underhill, pick up a copy as soon as you can. This book introduced us to iconic retail catch phrases such as the “butt- brush effect”, helped us identify our store’s “decompression zone” and taught us how to “shop like a man”. Published in 1999, many of his theories withstand the test of time
Categories
Published
of 7
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
  A MERCHANDISING TOP TEN LIST  – BEST PRACTICES MADE SIMPLE   Tips By Merchandising Guru Ali Levy,  Alijlevy@gmail.com     1.   Reading is Fundamental!   If you haven’t read   “Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping” by Paco   Underhill, pickup a copy as soon as you can. This book introduced us to iconic retail catch phrases such as the “butt - brush effect”, helped us identify our store’s “decompression zone” and taughtus how to “shop like a man”. Published in 1999, many of hi s theories withstand the test oftime. He has since released a new book dealing with marketing specifically to women, entitled “WhatWomen Want”. A great companion piece to his books is his website, envirosell.com.  2.   Dude: Where’s my Camero?  As with redneck hairstyles , store merchandising should follow the rule of “business in the front   (newarrivals and hot sellers) while   “party in the back” ( sale merchandise) should always reside in the backsection of your   store. Even if you are trying to blow out last season’s winter boots, displaying them in primereal estate which is the front of the store, sends the message that new merchandise isn’t as important to you or your customer as getting rid of those old boots are. 3. Follow the Yellow Brick Road:  Equally as important is to create a cohesive flow of traffic. It’s a well - known fact that grocery storesguide you through the produce section first and always position the everyday staples such as milk andeggs way in the back, therefore deliberately making you shop the entire store. You should employ thisprinciple in your store as well. Spend some time moving fixtures around and walking the route until it feelsnatural and directs your customers exactly where you want them to go. 4. “Wait –   how do I get to the yellow brick road?”  Signage is important. I believe the statistic stands at around 3 seconds that a consumer will spendreading a sign. That means signage needs to be large enough to read and to the point. “SALE”, “NEWFOR SPRING”, “MEN’S OUTERWEAR”, etc. Stay away from hand - made signs (hand -made signs canbe great when used in the correct context  – like a crafty window display). Stick to computer generatedsigns and invest in matching sign holders. You can visitgrandandbenedicts.com for options. I also   like carlson-store-fixtures.com.  5. Let There be Light (preferably not fluorescent!).This is by far the most overlooked element to a retail space. Creating the best lighting to showcase productand highlight window displays requires some research. I suggest you start looking up while at trade showsand when shopping in grocery stores, book stores and other retail outlets. Get a sense of the good, thebad and the ugly in regards to lighting and discover what appeals to you and what makes you want to runout of a store. Good places to look for lighting resources are: ddimagazine.com,home improvement   stores, even places like Ikea may offer some affordable solutions. 6. DUDE: WHERE’S MY SWIFFER?   Let’s face it.   A clean store is a happy place to shop. My personal favorite dust bunny wrangler is theSwiffer. You know the drill: clean windows, glass display cases, mirrors, fixtures and dressing rooms on aregular basis. Invest in a good vacuum. Stockpile extra light bulbs when they go on sale and replace themreligiously. Keep the area behind the cash wrap free of food, coffee mugs and clutter. 7. KEEP IT FRESH! The importance of rotating stock couldn’t be more important right now. With manufacturers producing lessand shrinking OTB’s, refreshing your floor  on a regularly scheduled basis is essential. Window displaysshould change every 2 weeks. Your entrance display should change weekly. Your weekly sales reports willidentify slow movers and you should plan your floor change based on these findings. Same idea applies tovendor POP. Keep it fresh, updated and seasonally relevant. 8.   COLOR THAT’S EASY AS ABC!  Remember in grade school science we learned ROYGBIV? Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo andviolet. I use this a lot when merchandising. It helps me put same style items in multiple colors together in a  manner that is pleasing to the eye. Another color guideline is to limit how many shades you have on a fourway fixture. 3  – 5 colors are good. Anymore and it gets confusing. Use this same principle for walldisplays. Check out pantone.com for color guidance and inspiration.   9.   FIXTURES, ETC. It’s important that your store maintain a uniform look. Using vendor supplied fixtures is a great way to showcase the brands you carry. If using generic fixtures, keep them consistent. Bear in mind the basics: keep signage and fixtures at eye level and don’t obstruct the natural line of vision towards the back of thestore. Furthermore I can’t stress the imp ortance of mannequins and body forms. They are instrumental inhelping your customer put outfits together and guiding them on proper usage. They also provide high crossmerchandising opportunities by adding shoes, skis, packs, goggles, etc. Check out ozmannequins.com.I   like these because they are lightweight and made in the U.S.A. 10. FINALLY, CREATE A “LIGHTS ON TO LIGHTS OFF” TO DO LIST:   Most stores do this anyway, but if you don’t then create a spreadsheet that has daily “to - do” duties on it with boxes next to it to check off when each job is complete. Better yet laminate this and use dry erasemarkers so you can reuse it each day. This gets employees used to keeping the store neat and tidy every day. As they say, “if you have time to lean, you have time to clean.”   To do…      What not to do…     
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks