School Work

A Short Introduction to Hallucinogens

Description
A Short Introduction to Hallucinogens
Categories
Published
of 64
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
   1 Dave King  2 ONTENTS  A Quick Introduction……………………………………………………………….  A Definition ……………………………………………………………………….. Medical Safety …………………………………………………………………...  An Anthropological History …………………………………………………….. Legality ……………………………………………………………………………... Photos ……………………………………………………………….……………… Medical Use ……………………………………………………………………… Chemistry …………………………………………………………………………. The Psychedelic Experience ………………………………………………….  Afterword…………………………….. …………………………………………… Bibliography and Further Reading……………………………………………..   3 6 10 13 17 22 30 36 41 54 62   3 I first wrote this booklet for my family and fr    iends as a de-stigmatiser and to supply a short summary of psychedelic knowledge. It is not at all academic; it is completely unreferenced, very personal, and probably infringes copyright laws at a dangerous frequency. After numerous requests I am now, finally, uploading it to the internet. Should any claims in this work provoke curiosity, cynicism or outright indignation, please contact me for references at dk85[at]kent.ac.uk. A second version is in the works, and should be much more academic. I plan to go into the field of ethnopharmacology, following my current degree in Anthropology, my planned masters in Pharmacognosy and doctorate in the aforementioned specialism. Part of the research that I aspire to do will involve extensive, academic research into the class of hallucinogens– a most interesting group of compounds. There is, unfortunately, a great deal of stigma associated with these substances, and all too often they are grouped alongside more dangerous intoxicants such as heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine; both by law and by the rather all inclusive label of ‘drugs’. There is a prevailing opinion that hallucinogens pose a danger to both body and mind, individual and society. It is rare, for instance, that I find somebody who knows that in the 1940s and the 1950s, hallucinogens were widely used in a medical setting therapeutically, and that they were integral to a massive advance in understanding of and in  4 the fields of psychiatry, psychotherapy and psychopharmacology during this time. It is rare also that people are aware that the banning of hallucinogens in the early 1970s was against the advice of almost every doctor in the relevant fields, without any scientific evidence, and in response to a public outcry propagated by a string of media claims that were either based on poor research or were fabricated completely. It is incredible to read some of these articles (and to my mind a far greater crime to knowingly publish something, manifestly influential and erroneous, to further one’s own celebrity or bank balance - especially when medical and therapeutic avenues suffer as a consequence- than it can be to responsibly administer anything   to one’s own body) and to appreciate that they were actually printed. It is also uncommon to find people aware of the rather interesting fact that many of the classic plant hallucinogens have been utilised by both man and   animals since pre-history. From the Ancient Greeks to the Mayans, across every continent and throughout time, hallucinogens have been considered sacred gateways to spiritual realms. I take some offence to any published work that criticises or praises anything, regardless of content or my personal opinion, if it is an argument unsupported by reason, research, science or logic. This semi-excludes the critique of art and literature which cannot be entirely scientific, but in a similar fashion there are few people who would rate a book review of someone who had not, after all, actually read the book. As such, I shall endeavour to avoid a single incidence in this leaflet where I pose fiction or opinion as fact. If I make claims like “the banning of hallucinogens in the ‘70s was not supported by scientific evidence”, please be aware that I am not making wild, uncorroborated allegations. I would supply references to all claims, but I do not want this to appear to be a formal, pedantic work of academia. If I put forward an opinion, I will attempt to make it clear that it is just an opinion. A bibliography is at the back of this leaflet, containing a useful list of further reading. If you have questions after reading this, I shall either refer you to a
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks