Documents

AHDS-Planning and Managing Digital Resource Creation Projects.pdf

Description
Página 1 de 11 Planning and managing digital resource creation projects Content written on: 8th June 2004 by Zoe Bliss and Matthew Woollard. Content updated: 8th June 2004 by Zoe Bliss and Matthew Woollard. Planning and managing digital resource creation projects...............................................1 Introduction.............................................................................................................................................2 1. Concept .....................
Categories
Published
of 11
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
  Página 1  de 11 Planning and managing digital resource creation projects Content written on: 8th June 2004 by Zoe Bliss and Matthew Woollard.Content updated: 8th June 2004 by Zoe Bliss and Matthew Woollard. Planning and managing digital resource creation projects...............................................1 Introduction.............................................................................................................................................21. Concept..............................................................................................................................................22. Project Scope.....................................................................................................................................2 2.1 Aims and objectives..................................................................................................................22.2 Approach ...................................................................................................................................22.3 Initial studies................................................................................................................................3 3. Project Plan.........................................................................................................................................4 Why is a good project plan important?.......................................................................................43.1 Deliverables................................................................................................................................43.2 Realistic/achievable milestones.............................................................................................43.3 Workflow......................................................................................................................................53.4 Relationship between tasks.....................................................................................................53.5 Potential roles and responsibilities ..........................................................................................63.6 Management or advisory committee...................................................................................63.7 Stakeholders...............................................................................................................................63.8 Copyright / IP strategy..............................................................................................................63.9 Sourcing, conservation and movement of srcinal materials ...........................................73.10 Standards..................................................................................................................................73.11 Technical/data development..............................................................................................73.12 QA procedures and evaluation ...........................................................................................73.13 Budgeting (in part of project plan)......................................................................................83.14 Partnership agreements.........................................................................................................8 Other issues..............................................................................................................................................8 4.1 Delivery mechanisms................................................................................................................84.2 Risk assessment ..........................................................................................................................94.3 Continuation and/or exit strategy..........................................................................................94.4 Documentation .......................................................................................................................104.5 Communications.....................................................................................................................104.6 Decision-making process.......................................................................................................11 Conclusions.......................................................................................................................................... 11Bibliography......................................................................................................................................... 11  Página 2  de 11 Introduction This AHDS Information Paper addresses at a relatively simple level some of the main issuesfaced by academic researchers when planning a major research or resource enhancement project. Itcovers the issues which will need to be addressed in a funding application to the AHRB, but will alsoinform other researchers, including those already involved in digital resource creation projects.Most projects can be neatly be divided into three main sections. The planning stage coversthat part of the project from initial concept to funding. The effectuation stage covers the part from fundingto delivery. The continuation period refers to the post-delivery period. Each period is vital to the successof a project, though an emphasis on first two stages is usually made. (Yeates, 1991). 1. Concept  All projects must start with an initial concept or vision. During most research projects theseconcepts are put to the test; in digitisation projects the vision is achieved. This should be a clear andconcise statement outlining what you want to do, why you want to do it, and why it is important. It will alsoneed to consider any previous work done in the field and how it will be enlarged upon in your project.Your concept should be reasonably rigid and your vision statement should encapsulate precisely whatyou want to do. This means that further work on the project plan will avoid creeping scope, which is ablurring of the boundaries of the project. 2. Project Scope The 'project scope' should consider the aims and objectives of the project. Objectives or goals should be concrete outputs, but are not necessarily deliverables. The following section explains thisproject management terminology. 2.1 Aims and objectives  Aims and objectives are often used interchangeably, but refer to subtly different things. Aimsare broader but more ephemeral: objectives are concrete and measurable, but more prosaic. Aims shouldbe encapsulated in a short statement of intent which provides a summary of what you intend to achieve or the problems you aim to solve.The JISC (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/ Joint Information Systems Committee) suggest that objectives should be SMART. That is:S pecificM easurable A chievableR ealisticT imedEach of the following headings in this section should be considered before moving forwardon a project. 2.2 Approach a) Strategy - there may be a number of different ways of carrying out what you wish toachieve. At an early stage you should consider these different approaches and assess whether anapproach which you had not previously considered may be better for your project than one you hadsrcinally thought reasonable.b) Issues - if your project is in response to a specific call rather than an 'open' call it isimportant to ensure that your project addresses the precise issues relevant to that call. For projects which  Página 3  de 11 intend to apply for AHRB (Arts and Humanities Research Board) funding it is necessary to consider whether the project falls within the published terms of reference of its main research funding schemes.c) Scope - make sure that your project plan is clear about what you will and what you will notbe doing. Consider overlap with other projects and resource constraints which may be imposed by your institution.d) Success factors - these are factors on which the success of the project depends. As theJISC project management guidelines suggest if you're building a prototype system to demonstratefeasibility, then scalability or sustainability may be critical success factors….If you're developing learningobjects, the pedagogical quality may be a critical success factor . 2.3 Initial studies There are two forms of study which can be carried out in advance of the creation of adetailed project plan. Firstly, a feasibility study which may also encompass a pilot study and secondly, auser-needs survey.The main aim of the feasibility study is to address whether the objectives of the project areachievable. This is done by attempting to answer the following questions in as much detail as possible. ã  What materials are to be digitised? ã  Are they suitable for digitisation? ã  Are there existing catalogues? ã  Will, and in what ways will digitisation benefit the collection? ã  What are the potential sources of funding? ã  Is the expected time-scale adequate? ã  Are there sufficient resources allocated?The feasibility study should also address the question: Is the project necessary? Sinceprojects usually have outputs there is a need to discover whether those outputs are useful to the end-user. It may be that you feel that the only end user is yourself. This is not usually the case, especially asthe AHDS preserves and disseminates outputs from projects. Whatever you may produce is likely to be of value to other researchers, and considering their potential needs will be of value to the way in which youplan your project.Undertaking an analysis of user-needs to discover what your potential users want or howthey might use the results of the project is a valuable pre-planning element of any project. It is a rareproject which has outputs which are not reusable by others - though it is often difficult to see how othersmight put your own research outputs to use. Putting a few simple measures in place at this stage mightfacilitate further use - a use to which you had not srcinally considered at the outset of the project.User-needs analysis should cover the broadest range of your target audience as possible.This does not necessarily mean that a large number of people should be questioned, but that all possiblepotential user groups, from school teachers to other researchers and from undergraduates to specialinterest groups. A broad, but targetted audience may bring all sorts of unforeseen comments that derail or deflect from your initial concept of the project, but it will be as well to reflect carefully on these and gaugetheir relevance to the project, and if necessary alter the scope of the project. For example, someresearchers making machine-readable versions of the census enumerators' books for the nineteenth  Página 4  de 11 century omit certain variables because they feel that they are not important for their own research - in factthe Genealogical Society of Utah inconsistently omitted the column relating to disability in their transcription of the 1881 Census of Great Britain making the whole of this part of their work problematic.(Goose, forthcoming).The combination of your srcinal project scope and vision with the feasibility and user studiesshould leave you in a position to draw up an initial project plan. While a project plan should cover asmany eventualities of the project as possible, you should always remember that a project plan does nothave to be followed rigidly. Project plans almost always evolve over the life of the project, it may berevisited, revised and altered as necessary during the progress of the project.While it is normal to have some flexibility between proposing, planning and executing aproject, major variations in deliverables and deadlines may need to be approved in advance by thefunding body. In many cases, your application and letter of grant represent a contract that you are legallyrequired to fulfil. As a rule of thumb, if your variation means a change to your initial proposal, a change toproject deadlines or a change to deliverables, then you may need to have these approved by the fundingbody. For example, in the case of extensions to a project the AHRB will only allow a six-monthcontinuation period in exceptional circumstances and with their approval. See the  AHRB Terms andConditions of Resource Enhancement Awards(http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/website/apply/research/resource_enhancement.asp) Other funding bodies may have different conditions - read the small print!In most cases the project plan should be considered in two distinguishable parts. Firstly, asan outline project plan which is used to secure funding. Secondly, on the basis of the first, a full-blownproject plan which can be used in the execution of the project. The outline plan should not omit any of theareas mentioned below but should be more concise than the full project plan. 3. Project Plan Why is a good project plan important? The project plan provides a concept-document for the project. It gives the project leader aconcrete basis on which to carry out the project. It is designed for the project manager and not for thefunding body! The plan enables progress and performance to be monitored and evaluated throughout theproject. The plan also provides a point of contact for all people within the project, not just the projectmanager and all the project staff, but also any advisory or management boards and of course the funders.The plan should be made available to all relevant staff and should be understood by thewhole team. What should a good project plan contain? The main headings covered by the project planshould include: 3.1 Deliverables Outline what you will have achieved at the end of the project. In a digital resource creationproject these are usually digitalised images, metadata, a user-interface and some documentation.However, there are many other outputs which one should consider within a plan. These includedemonstrators, workshops, documentation, reports, software, technical and user manuals, and FAQsamongst others. It is important to consider all things which are expected to be created during the lifetimeof the project. Throughout the life of the project the project manager should review these deliverables ona periodic basis. It is possible that the deliverables may alter and sometimes they will need to bedelivered before or after the planned delivery date. 3.2 Realistic/achievable milestones (See the section on relationships between tasks)

ICAI

Jul 23, 2017
Search
Tags
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks