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Alternate Forms of Renewable Energy Science Unit Plan

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Alternate Forms of Renewable Energy Science Unit Plan Science and linked to what other areas; Grade level Unit Name Essential unit question related to science topic Unit goals and interdisciplinary perspective
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Alternate Forms of Renewable Energy Science Unit Plan Science and linked to what other areas; Grade level Unit Name Essential unit question related to science topic Unit goals and interdisciplinary perspective matched with Maine Learning Results Standards Grade 5 (this unit could easily be adapted for lower elementary grades by going into less detail and adapted for middle school students by providing a more in-depth look at alternate forms of energy). Science with connections to reading, language arts, math, art, and social studies. Alternate Forms of Renewable Energy Why should we explore alternate sources of renewable energy to create electricity? Science unit goals: B. The Skills and Traits of Scientific Inquiry and Technological Design: Students plan, conduct, analyze data from and communicate results of in-depth scientific investigations; and they use a systematic process, tools, equipment, and a variety of materials to create a technological design and produce a solution or product to meet a specific need. B 1 Skills and Traits of Scientific Inquiry 1. Students plan, conduct, analyze data from, and communicate results of investigations, including fair tests. Pose investigable questions and seek answers from reliable sources of scientific information and from their own investigations. * Students will research alternate forms of renewable energy focusing on geothermal power, waterpower, solar power, as well as biomass power. Information obtained will be kept in student s science journals. * Students will participate in the development of a K/W/L chart. (Reference participation in K/W/L//poster development on lesson plan rubric). Students will use time well in class focusing their attention on the activity at hand. (Reference participation on lesson plan rubric). C. The Scientific and Technological Enterprise: Students understand the history and nature of scientific knowledge and technology, the processes of inquiry and technological design, and the impacts science and technology have on society and the environment. C1 Understandings of Inquiry Students describe how scientific investigations result in explanations that are communicated to other scientists. a. Describe how scientists answer questions by developing explanations based on observations, evidence, and knowledge of the natural world. (Reference science processes on lesson plan rubric) * Students will share their findings (which will be compiled into a report and a poster will be created) with the class by facilitating a discussion about their identified topic and referencing the poster that was created. (Reference presentation of poster on lesson plan rubric) B1 Skills and Traits of Scientific Inquiry Students plan, conduct, analyze data from, and communicate results of investigations, including fair tests. d. Use data to construct and support a reasonable explanation. * Students will identify reasons why utilizing renewable resources is beneficial to the environment as well as a cost effective alternative to the utilization of non-renewable resources. A. Unifying Themes: Students apply the principals of systems, models, constancy, and change, and scale in science and technology. A3 Constancy and Change b. Make tables or graphs to represent changes. * Students will explain why the exploration of alternate energy sources is important, and plot on a graph the estimated time that our non-renewable sources will be depleted if our renewable resources are not utilized to a greater degree. C3 Science, Technology, and Society Students identify and describe the influences of science and technology on people and the environment. c. Explain that natural resources are limited, and that reusing, recycling, and reducing materials and using renewable resources is important. * Students will compare and contrast a non-renewable source of energy with a renewable source of energy (focusing on the alternate forms of energy that have been discussed throughout this unit). (Reference report on lesson plan rubric). Interdisciplinary possibilities: English/Language Arts: Students could be asked to create a fiction story incorporating facts that they have learned about alternate forms of energy. Exceptional students could take this one step further and create a Readers Theater with their story. Students could also write poems focusing on one or more alternate forms of energy. D. INFORMATIONAL TEXTS 1. Students will apply reading, listening, and viewing strategies to informational texts across all areas of curriculum. Students will be able to: 2. Identify useful information organizing strategies. 5. Produce and support generalizations acquired from informational texts. 6. Describe new knowledge presented in informal texts and how it can be used. Reading: While this unit is being taught the reading lesson could focus on fiction as well as non-fiction stories related to alternate sources of energy (examples of books that would be appropriate to utilize are found on the last pages of this document). A variety of books, for an array of reading levels will be provided by the teacher and located in the classroom for students to borrow. A. PROCESSES OF READING 1. Students will use the skills and strategies of the reading process to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate what they have read. Students will be able to: 1. Formulate questions to be answered while reading. 2. Reflect on what has been discovered and learned while reading, and formulate additional questions. 4. Use specific strategies (e.g., rereading, consultation) to clear up confusing parts of a text. 8. Read for a wide variety of purposes (e.g., to gain knowledge, to aid in making decisions, to receive instructions, to follow and argument, to enjoy). 9. Explain orally and defend opinions formed while reading and viewing. Math: Students could be asked to measure wind speed, as well as asked to calculate how much electricity is needed to power their school/home, students could be asked to calculate how much energy one windmill on a wind farm produces. A. NUMBERS AND NUMBER SENSE 1. Students will understand and demonstrate a sense of what numbers mean and how they are used. Students will be able to: 3. Apply concepts of ratios, proportions, percents, and number theory (e.g., primes, factors, and multiples) in practical and other mathematical situations. B. COMPUTATION 1. Students will understand and demonstrate computation skills. Students will be able to: 2. Create, solve, and justify the solution for multi-step, real life problems including those with ratio and proportion. Social Studies: Students could be asked to trace the history of the harnessing of wind for utilization as an alternate source of energy. Students could be asked to locate and trace areas of the world that rely on wind farms for a significant portion of their electric demands. HISTORY A. CHRONOLOGY 1. Students will use the chronology of history and major eras to demonstrate the relationships of events and people. Students will be able to: 1. Describe the effects of historical changes on daily life. GEOGRAPHY A. SKILLS AND TOOLS 1. Students will know how to construct and interpret maps and use globes and other geographic tools to locate and derive information about people, places, regions, and environments. Students will be able to: 2. Develop maps, globes, charts, models and databases to analyze geographical patterns on databases to analyze geographical patterns on the earth. Visual and Performing Arts: Students could be presented with an array of visual images of the windmill and it s evolution over time. Students could be asked to identify what time period in history that the various windmill were most predominant. Students could also be asked to give their perspective on how/if the windmill could be seen by some as an art form. Sample lesson plan Resources including media, print, places to visit, agencies that could provide expertise B. CULTURAL HERITAGE 1. Students will understand the cultural contributions (social, ethical, political, religious dimensions) of the arts, how the arts shape and are shaped by prevailing cultural and social beliefs and values, and recognize exemplary works from a variety of cultures and historical periods. Students will be able to: MIDDLES GRADES Compare and contrast the characteristics and purposes of the arts from various cultures, historical periods, and social groups. 5. Identify how the factors of time and place (such as climate, resources, ideas, and technology) are reflected in visual and performing arts. See attached Children s Literature Fiction Bang, M. (2004). My light. NY: Scholastic, Inc. Engineering is Elementary Team. (2006). Reminder for Emily an electrical engineering story. [Not mentioned]: Museum of Science. Engineering is Elementary Team. (2005). Leif catches the wind: A mechanical engineering story. [Not mentioned]: Museum of Science. Fisher, L. (2004). Don Quixote and the windmills. [Not mentioned]: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Rideout, S. (1999). Don't go up a windmill. [Not mentioned]: Blue Windmill Books. Woelfle, G. (2006). Katje the windmill cat. [Not mentioned]: Candlewood Press. Nonfiction Gallant, R. (2003). Resources nature's riches. Tarrytown, New York: Benchmark Books. Morris, N, (2007). Biomass power. North Mankato, MN: Smart Apple Media. Morris, N. (2007). Geothermal power. North Mankato, MN: Smart Apple Media. Morris, N. (2007). Solar power. North Mankato, MN: Smart Apple Media. Morris, N. (2007). Water power. North Mankato, MN: Smart Apple Media. Petersen, C. (2004). Alternative energy. NY: Scholastic Library Publishing. Websites Streaming video on wind turbines. Personal Solutions for all of us to learn how to make a difference Facility of the US Department of Energy (DOE) for renewable energy and energy efficiency research, development and deployment. Provides information about renewable energy, energy efficiency practices, delivery and storage technologies, applications and student resources US Department of Energy web site for information on energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Illustrated explanations of the five renewable sources used most often: hydropower (water), solar, wind, geothermal, and biomass. Renewable Energy Sources. Read the latest research on renewable sources of energy such as solar energy, wind power, nuclear energy, hydrogen fuel, ethanol, etc. Teachers and students can learn about renewable energy, solar power, wind energy, water power and biomass energy. Download renewable energy lesson plans. Local Resources Boston Museum of Science Science Park Boston, MA. Catching the Wind Exhibit Wind turbines are appearing more frequently both in the news and along our highways. Observe one type of wind energy and learn about the advantages and drawbacks of alternative energy sources. Sun Power Exhibit Sunlight is the world' s largest energy resource, and more energy in the form of sunlight reaches Earth every hour than humans consume in a year. In this exhibit, visitors can learn how we can make use of all of this energy. Differentiation strategies A wide variety of books are available for the varying abilities of students (many of them are referenced in the Children's Literature section of this unit plan). The research that students are assigned to complete could be done in a variety of ways, books, internet, video. So that information could be obtained in a variety of ways. Unit assessment instruments linked to unit goals If students are unable to write a formal report then they could create a diorama, drawing, create a clay sculpture of their findings, or the gifted student may choose to participate in both options (report and a hands on option). Focus on science Science notebook during research of renewable forms of energy. Students should include drawings/pictures of all of the renewable resources that were discussed in class as well as written documentation as to why the resource is a renewable form of energy. Students will be assessed on their presentation of the material presented to the class. Did the student participate in all aspects of the project? Did the student participate in the creation of the poster and was the information presented on the poster accurate? Students will be able to make the connection as to why increased utilization of renewable resources is so important to our future, the connection can be included in the students report, poster or in the information presented to the class. Students will be assessed on their contributions to the K/W/L chart with a focus on what they have learned (reference rubric). Students will be assessed on the accuracy of the graph that was created. Students will be observed during their group work, the teacher will be noting if students are utilizing the science processes of observation, inference as well as cause and effect (reference attached rubric). Poster Rubric Name Criteria Date Ability to Focus Student focused and directed throughout the activity; attentively listens to others and contributes to the creation of the poster as well as the K/W/L chart Student focused most of the time, listens to others and contributes to the creation of the poster as well as the K/W/L chart Student requires much redirection, listens to others but does not contribute to the creation of the poster and minimally participates in the development of the K/W/L chart Does not respond to redirection, interrupts others and distracts members of the group no participation in poster or K/W/L development Use of science processes in poster development Independently was able to identify cause and effect relationships as well as identify differences between renewable and non renewable resources Required minimal prompting of the science processes was able to see the cause and effect relationship with little explanation Student required much redirection throughout the activity and unable to identify the cause and effect relationship between utilization of renewable and non renewable resources Unable to work independently on activity and unable to identify the cause and effect relationship between the utilization of renewable and non renewable resources Presentation of poster The poster is exceptionally attractive. The poster is attractive. The poster is fair. The poster is of poor quality. Included at least 3 accurate cause and effect relationships and shows a full understanding of the topic Included 2 accurate cause and effect relationships student requires little explanation of the topic Student included 1accurate description of the effects of utilization or depletion of the resource student did not convey an understanding of the topic Does not convey the effects of utilization or depletion of the resource students expressed little commitment to enhancing their knowledge
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