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Problems in exchanging product information between automotive suppliers and car manufacturers

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Problems in exchanging product information between automotive suppliers and car manufacturers
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  THE L RGEST EUROPE N FORUM Ol UTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY WiïH INTSiN VON LP RTICIP TION .  7TH  ^ 1994  ^ Aachen Germany 31st October  ~  4th November -  PROCEEDINGS FOR  THE DEDICATED CONFERENCE  ON  - LEAN/AGILE  MANUFACTURING IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRIES SPONSORED  BY |"ft   ENTE  PER LE NUOVE  TECNOLOGIE, CI^CIA .  L ENERGIA  E  L AMBIENTE  DECADES  OF  SPONSORSHIP  FROM MAJOR AUTOMOTIVE MANUFACTURERS  AND  SUPPLIERS  HAVE  HOSTED  AND  SUPPORTED  THE ISATA SYMPOSIA FOR  THE  SEVENTIES 1972 1977 •974 Ford, UK 1975 Istituto Motori, Naples, Italy 1976 Italian National Research Council CNR), Rome, Italy • 1978 Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg, Federal Republic of Germany 1979 AVL List GesmbH, Graz, Austria FOR  THE  EIGHTIES 198 Fiat Auto SpA, Turin, Italy 1981  Volvo Car Corporation, Stockholm, Sweden 1982  Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg, Federal Republic of Germany 1983  Ford-werke AG, Cologne, Federal Republic of Germany 1984 Alfa-Romeo SpA, Milan, Italy 1985  AVL List GesmbH, Graz, Austria 1988 Intel International, Flims, Switzerland May 1987 Cassa di Risparmio di Firenze, Provincia di Firenze, Universita di Firenze, Italy October 1987 Motorola, Munich, Federal Republic of Germany May 1988 ENEA, Cassa di Risparmio di Firenze, Provincia di Firenze, Universita di Firenze, Italy October 1988 Allen-Bradley International Ltd., Monte Carlo May 1989 ENEA, Cassa di Risparmio di Firenze, Provincia di Firenze, Universita di Firenze, Italy November 1989 Adam Opel AG, Wiesbaden, Federal Republic of Germany FOR  THE  NINETIES:  current and  future  sponsors: May 1991 June 1992 September 1993 October 1994 Oct/Nov 1995 May/June 1996 ENEA, Florence, Italy ENEA, Florence, Italy ENEA, Aachen, Germany ENEA, Aachen, Germany ENEA, Aachen, Germany ENEA, Florence, Italy Published by: ISBN 0  947719  70 9 Automotive Automation Limited 42 Lloyd Park Avenue Croydon GRO 5SB, England Tel:  -1 -44  81  681 3069, Telefax: +44  81  686 1490, E.Mail:  100270.1263@compuserve.com  TABLE  OF  CONTENTS LEAN AGILE MANUFACTURING FOR TH AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRIES  If 94LM09 1  An  Litegrated  Approach  to  Quality Testing  in  ttie  Automotive Production. Dr  A  Scliolz,  DSA-Datcn-und  Syslemstechnik  GmbH,  Germany y4LM097  Reliability  Based  Maintenance  in  Car Manufacturing. Mr  J Sas,  CSl  Europe,  Belgium 94LM086  Process  Distributed  Maintenance  Engineering:  An  Approach  for  Quality  Maintenance  in Lean  Production. Dr  A  Crespo  Marquez  and Professor  R  Ruiz  Usano,  Universidad de  Sevilla,  Spain 94LM022  The  Motion Planning  Problem:  From  Global  to  Local. Mr E  Malotaux,  Mr E  Falkenauer and  Mr A Van  Muysewinkel,  CRIF  -  Research  Centre for  Belgian  Mijlalworking Industry,  Belgium 94LM095  Integrated  Manufacturing  Systems  Design  and Implementation. Mr M W C  Aguiar,  Mr  1  A  Coutts and Professor  R H  Weston,  Loughborough  University of  Technology,  UK THE  SUPPLIERS  ROLE  BN  LEAN/AGILE  MANUFACTURESG 94LM010  A  Model  of  Customer-Supplier  Relationships  for  Agile  Manufacturing. Professor  .K  Preiss,  Agility  Fonun,  Mr W C  MiUer,  Alcatel  Network  Sy.stems  and  Mr G Thompson,  Rockwell  International  Corporation,  USA 94LM014  JIT and  Monopsony. Mr M  BcdwcU,  Covcntr>'  University,  UK 94LM017  Problems  in  Exchanging  Product  Information  between  Automotive  Suppliers and  Car Manufacturers. Mr E  J  Haag  and  Dr A E  Vries-Baayens,  TNO CAD  Centre,  and  Ms R W  Vroom,  Delft University  of  Technology,  The  Netherlands 94LM021  Lean  Manufacturing and  High-Tech  Logistics  in  tlie  Automotive Supply Industny: Contradiction  or  Necessary  Condition. Dr  W  Siissengiith,  Miebach  &  Partner  GmbH,  Germany 94LM064  Implementation  of  Lean  Manufacturing  in  a  Supplier  Environment. Mr C  Wilson,  Hoskyns  Group  Pic and  Mr C  Hunter,  N D  Marston,  UK 94LM068  EDI  as a  Strategic  Key  Success  Factor  for  Component  Supphers. Professor  B E  Meyer,  ACTIS  in  Stuttgart  GmbH,  Germany INFORMATION  TECHNOLOGY  FOR  THE  SUPP Y  CHAIN 94LM011  Planning and Scheduling  Criterion  in  Generalized  Job-Shop  Problems:  Modelling and Resolution  Approach. Mr A  Fadil  and  Mr Z  Binder,  Laboratoire  d'Automatique  de  Grenoble  -ENSIEG,  France 94LM04 1  Quick  Response  and  Seasonal  Demand. Dr  D  J  Stockton,  De  Montfort  University  and  Mr M  Brown,  Teaching  Company  Associate, UK 94LM060  An  Information  Technology  Framework  for  Lean/Agile  Supply-Ba,sed  Industries  in Developing Countries. Dr  J  Goosscnaerts  and  Mr D  Bjomer,  United Nations  University,  Macao 94LM063  Conceptual Modeling  of  Manufacturing  Industry  using Object Oriented  Technology. Mr E K  Budiardjo and  Mr B P  Prinato,  University  of  Indonesia, Indonesia 94LM066 EP6706  -  MS 0:  Multi-Supplier/Multi-Site  Operations  -  Visible  Solutions  for the Automotive  Industry  in  JIT and  Logistics  Communications. Mr M  Matthiesen,  ACTIS  in  Stuttgart  GmbH,  Germany Page 617 623 633 641 649 657 665 673 683 691 699 705 713 719 727 733 7  PROBLEMS IN EXCHANGING PRODUCT INFORMATION BETWEEN  AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIERS AND CAR MANUFACTURERS Mr  E J Haag and Dr A E Vries-Baayens TNO CAD Centre and Ms R W Vroom Delft  University of  Teclinology The  Netherlands 94LM017 Introduction In  recent years,  development  and  manufacturing  processes  In  the  automotive industry  have been  radically  changed  as a  result  of new  competitive challenges. Yet,  the  1990s  seem  to  bring  no  halt  to the  trend.  This  paper  looks  at the consequences  of the  changes  for information technology  and  product data  exchange. First,  trends  in the  automotive  industry  and  their  requirements for information technology  tools  will  be  listed.  Problems  with  the  implementation  of  these  tools will  be  described  and the  International  Standard  STEP  will  be  presented  as a possible  solution. Finally,  we  will  present  a  survey  done  by the  Dutch  research institute  TNG CAD  Centre  and  the Faculty  of  Industrial  Design  Engineering  of  Delft University  of  Technology  to  turn  this  solution  into  a  practical  success. Trends  In  the  automotive  industry The  modern  automotive  industry  can be  characterized  by  four  trends, which  call  for a  new  approach  of  managing  the  production process. Before  we dig  into this  new form  of  management  and  its  demands  on  information technology support,  the  trends will  be  explained  briefly. 1.  The  regionally oriented  competition  of the  1980s  between  car  makers  in the USA,  Europe  and  Japan  has  changed  into  a  global oriented  competition  between large  automotive assemblers. This  has  resulted  in: Global  orientation  according  to the  establishment  of new  production plants.  Large  car  manufacturers  are  opening  new  assembly  plants  In  foreign selling  markets. With  intensive  competition  on a  global  scale,  this  is necessary to minimize  distribution  costs  and to  have  direct  access  to  data on  consumer  preferences  in  segmented  markets. Increase  of  inter-company co-operation.  Besides  mergers  and  acquisitions, the  1990s  show  all kinds  of  co-operative  initiatives  between  car manufacturers all over  the  world.  These  links  mainly take  the  form  of joint  ventures  or  temporarily co-operation  on  engineering  or  exchange  of parts.  We  thus  see a  global  network  of  co-operating  and  competing  car manufacturers, which requires  intensive  communication  over long distances. Information  technology  can be  used  to  manage  the  required  material  and information  flovjs. 2, Sophisticated  consumer  demands  are  forcing  car  makers  to  reduce  time-to-market and  Improve  total  quality  of  their  products.  The  global  market  is  scattering into  many  segments,  which  is  ultimately resulting  in a  grovjing  market  for customized cars. Yet, product  integrity  is  of  growing Importance,  meaning  that features  and  technology  have  to  match  the customers' view  of  the  total  vehicle concept. This requires  manufacturers  to  maintain close contacts  with  the market  and to  react  quickly  and  flexibly  to  its  changes  while keeping cost  of production  to a  minimum.  This  trend  asks  for  intensive  and  accurate  commu nication  between  product  development  and the  market,  and  intra-company communication  on  product data. In the  latter,  information technology  tools  can play  an  essential  role. 673
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