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Poverty, Median Income, and Health Insurance in Connecticut: Summary of 2012 American Community Survey Census Data

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Poverty, Median Income, and Health Insurance in : Summary of 2012 American Community Survey Census Data and the Nation Poverty, Income, & Uninsured September 19, 2013 Poverty in Poverty Indicator Persons
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Poverty, Median Income, and Health Insurance in : Summary of 2012 American Community Survey Census Data and the Nation Poverty, Income, & Uninsured September 19, 2013 Poverty in Poverty Indicator Persons with income less than Federal Poverty Level* All children under 18 under Federal Poverty Level** Related children under 18 under Federal Poverty Level All Children with income under 200% Federal Poverty Level *** Families with income below Federal Poverty Level % (372,000) from 2008 and 2002 (117,000) from % (114,000) from 2008 and % (237,000) from % (71,000) from 2008 and % (378,000) 14.9% (119,000) (117,000) 30.4% (242,000) 7.9% (71,000) % (315,000) 12.6% (100,000) 12.2% (96,000) 25.6% (204,000) 6.7% (59,000) % (249,000) Not Available 9.8% (83,000) Not Available 5.5% (49,000) changes by CT Voices for Children. One-year comparisons are valid for ACS data. Unless specifically noted, comparisons between 2012 data to other years are not statistically significant. Historical data reflect revised estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau. As a result, data listed here may not match previously published Census data. * In 2012, the federal poverty level was set at $23,283 for a two-parent household with two children. ** Persons and children in poverty are more inclusive groups than related children under 18 in poverty. All persons and children in poverty include some people living in group quarters. Related children, who might also be considered children in families, are those related to the head of household estimates for all children in poverty are not available due to the exclusion of those living in group quarters from the pre-2005 estimates. 33 Whitney Avenue New Haven, CT Phone Fax *** The 200% federal poverty level roughly corresponds to s Self-Sufficiency Standard -- a measure, created by the state of, of the income necessary for a family to meet basic needs. (The Standard for some regions of the state is considerably higher than 200% of the poverty level.) Poverty in the Nation in 2012 Poverty Indicator 2012 United States 2011 Persons with income less than Federal Poverty Level 15.9% (48.8 million) 15.9% (48.5 million) All Children under 18 with income under Federal Poverty Level Related children under 18 with income under Federal Poverty Level* All Children with income under 200% Federal Poverty Level Families with income below Federal Poverty Level 22.6% (16.4 million) 22.3% (16.1 million) 45.1% (32.8 million) 11.8% (9.1 million) 22.5% (16.4 million) 22.2% (16.1 million) 45.0% (32.7 million) 11.7% (8.9 million) changes by CT Voices for Children. Unless specifically noted, comparisons of 2012 data to other years are not statistically significant. * Related children, who might also be considered children in families, are those related to the head of household. Poverty Rates by Race/Ethnicity in in 2012 Persons with income less than Federal Poverty Level 5.8% White non-hispanic (141,953) 24.0% (84,162) African American Significantly higher than White non-hispanic 27.6% (136,942) Hispanic Significantly higher than White non-hispanic Data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey (ACS); calculations by Voices for Children. Voices for Children 2 Income Estimates for and the Nation Income Indicator United States Median household income in 2012 dollars (ACS) $67,276 Significant decrease from 2008 $67,223 $73,075 $51,371 Significant decrease from 2008 $51,324 changes by CT Voices for Children. Unless specifically noted, changes in median income estimates between 2011 and 2012 are not statistically significant. Uninsured Estimates for Uninsured Indicator All persons uninsured (point in time estimate) All children under 18 uninsured (point in time estimate) 9.1% (322,000) No significant change 3.8% (30,000) from 2011 Significant decrease from % (309,000) 2.9% (23,000) 8.8% (311,000) 4.6% (40,000) changes by CT Voices for Children. The Census began gathering uninsured estimates through the American Community Survey in The Census revised some of its initial 2008 uninsured ACS estimates, so data listed here may not match Census data published earlier. Voices for Children 3 Uninsured Estimates for the Nation Uninsured Indicator All persons uninsured (point in time estimate) All children under 18 uninsured (point in time estimate) 2012 (45.6 million) Significant decrease from % (5.3 million) Significant decrease from 2011 United States % (46.4 million) 7.5% (5.5 million) Data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey (ACS). changes by CT Voices for Children. Analysis of statistical significance of estimate Uninsured Rates by Race/Ethnicity in in 2012 All persons uninsured (point in time estimate) 6.1% White (non-hispanic) (152,000) 13.8% (49,000) African American Significantly higher than rate for White non-hispanic 19.5% (98,000) Hispanic Significantly higher than rate for White non-hispanic Data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey (ACS); calculations by Voices for Children. Analysis of statistical significance of estimate changes by CT Voices for Children. Estimated number of uninsured is less than statewide total because other racial/ethnic groups are not reported here. Voices for Children 4 s Large Cities Poverty, Income & the Uninsured Poverty Rates and Median Income in Cities in 2012 City Persons with income less than Federal Poverty Level Children under 18 under Federal Poverty Level Median household income in 2012 dollars STATEWIDE 10.7% $67,276 (10.3%-11.1%) (13.9%-15.7%) ($66,411-$68,141) Bridgeport 25.3% 37.6% $37,571 (22.1%-28.5%) (31.2%-44.0%) ($32,286-$42,856) Danbury 9.3% 11.0% $61,708 (6.4%-12.2%) (5.5%-16.5%) ($53,904-$69,512) Hartford 38.0% 53.1% $27,753 (34.6%-41.4%) (46.4%-59.8%) ($25,436-$30,070) New Britain 24.1% 31.0% $37,034 (20.1%-28.1%) (23.1%-38.9%) ($32,914-$41,154) New Haven 26.1% 37.9% $36,530 (22.5%-29.7%) (31.0%-44.8%) ($32,115-$40,945) Norwalk 10.3% 13.0% $70,580 (6.8%-13.8%) (5.1%-20.9%) ($66,341-$74,819) Stamford 7.7% 9.7% $75,771 (5.5%-9.9%) (5.2%-14.2%) ($69,784-$81,758) Waterbury 24.9% (20.9%-28.9%) 40.0% (32.6%-47.4%) $39,355 ($36,385-$42,325) changes by CT Voices for Children. Unless specifically noted, comparisons between 2011 and 2012 city data are not statistically significant. Single year estimates are only available for cities with populations greater than 65,000. The numbers reported in ACS surveys are estimates because only a sample of the entire population is surveyed. The margin of error estimates the range of values within which the population s actual uninsured rate is likely to fall. Because sample sizes for a survey at the city level (and particularly for subgroups like children) can be small, the margins of error can be quite wide, and differences between cities should be interpreted with caution. Voices for Children 5 Uninsured in Cities in 2012 Bridgeport Danbury Hartford New Britain New Haven Norwalk Stamford Waterbury All persons uninsured (point in time estimate) 9.1% (8.8%-9.4%) 23.4% (20.4%-26.4%) 18.4% (14.6%-22.2%) 15.5% (13.4%-17.6%) 11.7% (9.6%-13.8%) 13.8% (11.6%-16.0%) 15.1% (12.3%-17.9%) 15.2% (11.9%-18.5%) 14.4%* (11.4%-17.4%) changes by CT Voices for Children. Unless specifically noted, comparisons between 2011 and 2012 city data are not statistically significant. Single year estimates are available only for cities with populations greater than 65,000. *Indicates a statistically significant change: Uninsured All children under 18 uninsured (point in time estimate) 3.8%* (3.2%-4.4%) 8.5% (5.3%-11.7%) 2.4% (0.5%-4.3%) 5.2% (3.0%-7.4%) 5.1% (1.4%-8.8%) 5.8% (2.9%-8.7%) 14.0%* (6.6%-21.4%) 7.6% (0.8%-14.4%) 8.2%* (3.7%-12.7%) In the City of Waterbury, the percentage of persons who were uninsured rose from 10.5% in 2011 to 14.4% in Additionally, the percentage of children under 18 in Waterbury who were uninsured rose from 1.8% in 2011 to 8.2% in In the City of Norwalk, the percentage of children under 18 who were uninsured rose from 3.5% in 2011 to 14.0% in The numbers reported in ACS surveys are estimates because only a sample of the entire population is surveyed. The margin of error estimates the range of values within which the population s actual uninsured rate is likely to fall. Because sample sizes for a survey at the city level (and particularly for subgroups like children) can be small, the margins of error can be quite wide, and differences between cities should be interpreted with caution. In addition, dramatic changes over time, as in the city data above, should be interpreted with caution. Voices for Children 6 Counties Poverty, Income & Uninsured Poverty Rates and Median Income in Counties in 2012 Persons with income less than Federal Poverty Level Children under 18 under Federal Poverty Level Median household income in 2012 dollars STATEWIDE 10.7% (10.3%-11.1%) (13.9%-15.7%) $67,276 ($66,411-$68,141) Fairfield County 8.9% (8.1%-9.7%) 11.0% (9.6%-12.4%) $79,841 ($77,378-$82,304) Hartford County 12.5% (11.7%-13.3%) 17.2% (15.5%-18.9%) $63,536 ($61,337-$65,735) Litchfield County 6.4% (5.1%-7.7%) 7.2% (4.2%-10.2%) $67,658 ($64,349-$70,967) Middlesex County 5.7% (4.3%-7.1%) 6.6% (3.8%-9.4%) $74,484 ($70,128-$78,840) New Haven County 13.5% (12.4%-14.6%) 21.5% (19.1%-23.9%) $59,271 ($57,364-$61,178) New London County 9.2% (7.9%-10.5%) 13.6% (10.5%-16.7%) $66,603 ($63,495-$69,711) Tolland County 7.0% (5.4%-8.6%) 6.6% (3.1%-10.1%) $75,238 ($68,932-$81,544) Windham County 12.5% (10.2%-) 16.0% (11.2%-20.8%) $54,098 ($49,890-$58,306) changes by CT Voices for Children. Unless specifically noted, comparisons between 2011 and 2012 county data are not statistically significant. Voices for Children 7 Uninsured in Counties in 2012 Fairfield County Hartford County Litchfield County Middlesex County New Haven County New London County Tolland County Windham County All persons uninsured (point in time estimate) 9.1% (8.8%-9.4%) 11.4% (10.6%-12.2%) 7.9% (7.4%-8.4%) 7.7% (6.5%-8.9%) 7.9% (6.2%-9.6%) 9.8%* (9.1%-10.5%) 7.6% (6.5%-8.7%) 4.7% (3.6%-5.8%) 7.8% (6.4%-9.2%) Uninsured All children under 18 uninsured (point in time estimate) 3.8%* (3.2%-4.4%) 5.1%* (3.6%-6.6%) 2.7% (1.9%-3.5%) 3.2% (1.9%-4.5%) 4.9% (1.5%-8.3%) 4.1%* (3.1%-5.1%) 3.2% (1.1%-5.3%) 0.7% (0.1%-1.3%) 2.5% ( %) changes by CT Voices for Children. Unless specifically noted, comparisons between 2011 and 2012 county data are not statistically significant. *Indicates a statistically significant change: In New Haven County, the percentage of persons who were uninsured rose from 8.2% in 2011 to 9.8% in Additionally, the percentage of children in New Haven County under 18 who were uninsured rose from 2.4% in 2011 to 4.1% in In Fairfield County, the percentage of children under 18 who were uninsured rose from 3.2% in 2011 to 5.1% in Voices for Children 8 Congressional Districts Poverty, Income & Uninsured Poverty Rates and Median Income in Congressional Districts in 2012 Congressional District Persons with income less than Federal Poverty Level Children under 18 under Federal Poverty Level Median household income in 2012 dollars STATEWIDE 10.7% (10.3%-11.1%) (13.9%-15.7%) $67,276 ($66,411-$68,141) 1 st Congressional District (Rep. Larson) 12.3% (11.3%-13.3%) 17.6% (15.4%-19.8%) $63,674 ($60,828-$66,520) 2 nd Congressional District (Rep. Courtney) 8.0% (7.3%-8.7%) 10.3% (8.6%-12.0%) $69,811 ($67,674-$71,948) 3 rd Congressional District (Rep. DeLauro) 12.1% (11.1%-13.1%) 19.2% (16.9%-21.5%) $60,275 ($58,624-$61,926) 4 th Congressional District (Rep. Himes) 9.6% (8.7%-10.5%) 12.0% (10.3%-13.7%) $82,174 ($78,676-$85,672) 5 th Congressional District (Rep. Esty) 11.3% (10.4%-12.2%) 15.7% (13.6%-17.8%) $63,859 ($61,817-$65,901) Data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey (ACS). This data reflects Congressional district boundaries as of January 1, 2013 (the 113 th Congress), although the data were collected during calendar year Because these Congressional district boundaries reflect changes made as a result of decennial redistricting, valid comparisons are not possible over time. Voices for Children 9 Uninsured in Congressional Districts 2012 Congressional District 1 st Congressional District (Rep. Larson) All persons uninsured (point in time estimate) 9.1% (8.8%-9.4%) 8.5% (7.9%-9.1%) All children under 18 uninsured (point in time estimate) 3.8% (3.2%-4.4%) 3.1% (2.1%-4.1%) 2 nd Congressional District (Rep. Courtney) 3 rd Congressional District (Rep. DeLauro) 4 th Congressional District (Rep. Himes) 5 th Congressional District (Rep. Esty) 6.9% (6.2%-7.6%) 9.4% (8.7%-10.1%) 11.1% (10.1%-12.1%) 9.6% (8.6%-10.6%) 2.7% (1.6%-3.8%) 3.1% (2.2%-4.0%) 5.5% (3.7%-7.3%) 4.1% (2.9%-5.3%) Data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey (ACS). Because these Congressional district boundaries reflect changes made as a result of decennial redistricting, valid comparisons are not possible over time. Guide to Using Census Data Data Source. The United States Census Bureau released poverty estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) on September 19, Unless a change in Census estimates over time is statistically significant, it is not accurate to say, for example, that poverty rates have increased or declined. Unless specifically noted in the comparison charts above, there were no statistically significant changes in Census estimates between 2012 data and other years. The numbers reported in the ACS survey are estimates because only a sample of the entire population is surveyed. For this reason, the Census Bureau publishes additional data that allow us to estimate the range of values within which the population s actual poverty rate is likely to fall. This enables us to determine whether or not the change in an estimate from one time period to the next is large enough to conclude that a change in the population has occurred, or whether the change in the estimate may have been due to random chance. For example, in the field of opinion polling, the margin of error of a poll helps to assess whether there has been a significant change in polling results over time. A change in Census estimates is called statistically significant if it is unlikely to have occurred by chance. (This term describes the statistical evidence of change, not whether it is important or meaningful.) Statistical significance tests were conducted for poverty and uninsured rates, rather than numbers of people in poverty or numbers uninsured. Household Income Comparisons. ACS data for median household income is comparable over time. Median income figures are in 2012 dollars (inflation adjusted), so they would not match estimates in previous years reports. Health Insurance Coverage. In 2008, the US Census Bureau began including a question in its annual American Community Survey (ACS) on health insurance coverage. The question asks whether the person is currently Voices for Children 10 covered by any type of insurance. The results are not directly comparable to data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), which asks whether respondents were uninsured for the entire previous year. The sample size for the ACS is much larger than the CPS, so estimates of insurance status are available through the ACS for counties, Congressional Districts, and cities with population greater than 65,000. CPS estimates of the uninsured are available only at the national and state levels. See the table below for comparisons of these estimates. Understanding Census Bureau Estimates of the Uninsured When are 2012 estimates released? What does the survey measure? Are comparisons possible over time? Are national and state level estimates available? Are estimates available for counties, Congressional districts, and cities with populations greater than 65,000? American Community Survey (ACS) Current Population Survey (CPS) September 19, 2013 September 17, 2013 Uninsured at time of survey Yes, comparing one-year estimates for 2008, 2009, 2011, and 2012 Yes Yes Uninsured for entire previous year Yes, by using two-year averages (not single-year estimates) CT Voices use of ACS data is informed by the guidance of analysts at the Census Bureau, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and Coalition on Human Needs. Yes No Voices for Children 11
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