Real Estate

BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND OSTEOARCHAEOLOGY ANNUAL REVIEW

Description
BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND OSTEOARCHAEOLOGY ANNUAL REVIEW
Categories
Published
of 38
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
   BABAO Annual Review February 2004 Issue 5 1 BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGYAND OSTEOARCHAEOLOGY ANNUAL REVIEW  E   DITOR REBECCA GOWLAND St John’s College, Cambridge EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS OF THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND OSTEOARCHAEOLOGY:  C   HAIR JAMES STEELE University of Southampton G  ENERAL S   ECRETARY   T   REASURER  M   EMBERSHIP S   ECRETARY  HOLGER SCHUTKOWSKI JACKIE MCKINLEY MARGARET CLEGG University of Bradford   Wessex Archaeology University of Southampton    P  UBLICITY S   ECRETARY   R  EPRESENTATIVE FROM A  M  USEUM  R  EPRESENTATIVE FROM A U   NIT   DARLENE WESTON MARGARET JUDD MELISSA MELIKIAN  University of Bradford British Museum   AOC Archaeology, London.  R  EPRESENTATIVE FROM A  P   ROFESSIONAL O  RGANISATION  SIMON MAYS  Ancient Monuments Laboratory    N  ON  E   XECUTIVE  M   EMBERS  : ANDREW CHAMBERLAIN University of Sheffield SONIA ZAKRZEWSKI University of Southampton _____________________________________________________________________  Membership details can be obtained from: Dr Margaret Clegg, Department of Archaeology, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BF. e-mail: m.clegg@soton.ac.uk  Contributions for the Review concerning palaeopathological issues should be sent to : Trevor Anderson, VichyHouse, 15 St Mary’s Street, Canterbury CT1 2QL. E-mail: Anderson.Trevor@tiscali.co.uk  All other contributions for the Review should be sent to the Editor : Dr Rebecca Gowland, St. John’s College,Cambridge, CB2 1TP. e-mail: rlg31@cam.ac.uk  http://www.soton.ac.uk/~babao/    BABAO Annual Review February 2004 Issue 5 2 Welcome to the BABAO Annual Review 2003...................................................................................................................3 Association News.....................................................................................................................................................................3  A  NNUAL R EPORT ............................................................................................................................................3M EMBERSHIP R EPORT ....................................................................................................................................4BABAO M  ANAGING C OMMITTEE ...................................................................................................................5 People.........................................................................................................................................................................................5News and Project Updates......................................................................................................................................................5 N EWS FROM THE B RITISH M USEUM ...............................................................................................................5T HE WELLCOME O STEOLOGICAL R ESEARCH D  ATABASE P ROJECT .................................................................6T HE S PITALFIELDS M  ARKET P ROJECT ...........................................................................................................7F ORENSIC  A  RCHAEOLOGY IN  A  USTRALIA  .......................................................................................................8S TUDIES ON THE S KELETAL P  ATHOLOGY OF THE M OUNTAIN G ORILLA ........................................................8  Views...........................................................................................................................................................................................9 T HE REBURIAL D EBATE : A H ISTORICAL AND D OCTRINAL P ERSPECTIVE .......................................................9 Palaeopathology......................................................................................................................................................................10 D  ATABASE OF M  AJOR C ONGENITAL C ONDITIONS AND N EOPLASTIC D ISEASE .............................................10P  ATHOLOGICAL C  ASES  .................................................................................................................................11 Postdoctoral Research Projects............................................................................................................................................13Departmental Reports and Current Research Projects.....................................................................................................14 B.A.R.C., D EPARTMENT OF  A  RCHAEOLOGICAL S CIENCES , U NIVERSITY OF B RADFORD ..............................14D EPARTMENT OF  A  RCHAEOLOGY  , U NIVERSITY OF S HEFFIELD ....................................................................17F ORENSIC  A  NTHROPOLOGY  A  CTIVITIES AT THE MLC, S HEFFIELD ..............................................................17F ORENSIC AND B IOARCHAEOLOGICAL S CIENCES G ROUP , B OURNEMOUTH U NIVERSITY  .............................18D EPARTMENT OF  A  RCHAEOLOGY  , U NIVERSITY OF D URHAM .......................................................................20D EPARTMENT OF  A  RCHAEOLOGY  , U NIVERSITY OF S OUTHAMPTON .............................................................21I NSTITUTE OF  A  RCHAEOLOGY AND  A  NTIQUITY  , U NIVERSITY OF B IRMINGHAM ...........................................21I NSTITUTE OF  A  RCHAEOLOGY  , UCL ............................................................................................................22 New Courses...........................................................................................................................................................................22Postgraduate Research Abstracts.........................................................................................................................................23Excavations of Human Remains 2002-2003......................................................................................................................26 E  XCAVATIONS IN THE B OWL H OLE E  ARLY M EDIEVAL B URIAL G ROUND , B  AMBURGH  ................................26H UMAN SKELETAL REMAINS EXCAVATED OR ANALYSED BY FAS .................................................................27M USEUM OF L ONDON S PECIALIST S ERVICES : S KELETAL W ORK D URING 2003...........................................28E  XCAVATION AND  A  NALYSIS OF H UMAN S KELETAL R EMAINS BY  AOC A  RCHAEOLOGY .............................29H UMAN S KELETAL R EMAINS E  XCAVATED OR  A  NALYSED IN S UFFOLK 2003................................................30S UMMARY OF THE R EPORTS P RODUCED BY J. M C K  INLEY 2002-2003.........................................................30 Conference Reports................................................................................................................................................................31 R EVIEW OF THE F IFTH  A  NNUAL C ONFERENCE OF THE BABAO..................................................................31R EVIEW OF THE M EETING THAT  A  CCOMPANIED THE I NAUGURATION OF THE B.A.R.C...............................36R EVIEW OF THE I NTERNATIONAL C ONGRESS OF  A  NTHROPOLOGY  , A  THENS ................................................39 Forthcoming Conferences.....................................................................................................................................................40Members Publications (2001-2002).....................................................................................................................................41Membership List.....................................................................................................................................................................45   BABAO Annual Review February 2004 Issue 5 3 W ELCOME TO THE BABAO A  NNUAL R EVIEW 2003 Welcome to another edition of the BABAO AnnualReview. In this year’s Review, James Steele has providedimportant updates on the DCMS working group and theprogress of the Church Archaeology and HumanRemains Working Group. The committee will, no doubt,continue to keep us updated on developments as theyoccur. Margaret Clegg reports that the membership ofBABAO is both increasing and diversifying. This trend iscertainly reflected in the contributions received for thisyear’s Review, which includes forensic anthropologyand primatology as well as biological anthropology andarchaeology. Likewise, we have received reports onprojects and workshops as far a field as Australia andRwanda. Most of this Review, however, reflects themake-up of the majority of the membership, consistingof research updates, departmental reports, excavationnews, and skeletal analysis, undertaken in the UK.Contributions of particular interest include the researchupdates by Bill White and Rebecca Redfern at theMuseum of London. Thanks to all those who’vecontributed, it’s much appreciated, and a particularthanks to Chris Knüsel who has consistently provideddetailed accounts of the BABAO meetings over the lastfive years. I hope that you all find this Review asinteresting to read as I have to edit– though perhaps notquite so laborious!Becky GowlandEditor ____________________________________________  A  SSOCIATION N EWS   British Association forBiological Anthropology andOsteoarchaeology AnnualReport by James Steele (Chair), University of Southampton The BABAO has continued to grow in 2003. Membershiptrends are healthy, and the very successful autumnAnnual Conference demonstrated an increased breadthof interests among the active membership. These nowinclude many areas of biological anthropology, as wellas osteoarchaeology.The main external challenge faced by theAssociation during 2003 related to retention policies forhuman skeletal remains that are currently, and/or willin future be the subject of scientific study. The DCMSWorking Group on Human Remains in museumcollections published its report in November. TheWorking Group favours facilitation of repatriation toclaimant communities of human remains obtained fromoverseas between 1500 and 1947. Key to their findingswas the issue of consent (in an explicit analogy with thedebate about retention of human tissue samplesfollowing the Alder Hey Inquiry). A number ofrecommendations are made for legislative andregulatory changes that would permit museums toreturn remains, and that would ensure transparency andconsistency in the handling of claims for return. Thiswill form the basis of a consultation document to bepublished early in 2004. Needless to say the BABAO willsubmit a response.I am dismayed to see this debate so often castas one between science and ethics, as though thescientific case lacked an ethical foundation. On thecontrary, there is a profound ethical implication in anystatement of the value of continuing study of humanremains, in the interests of the advancement of scientificknowledge and public understanding of humanevolution and variability. This point has been maderepeatedly by Sir Neil Chalmers (Director of the NaturalHistory Museum), who was the principal dissentingvoice on the DCMS Working Group. We need tocontinue to make this case in dialogue with claimantcommunities and their intermediaries, in the hope ofachieving greater mutual understanding. This is,however, a task on an international scale.Meanwhile, policy for retention of humanremains of domestic srcin has been the focus of theChurch Archaeology and Human Remains WorkingGroup, convened jointly by Joseph Elders and SimonMays, and which is expected to put its draft report outfor consultation in April 2004. Preliminary indicationsare that the issues will be seen as less contested, and thata compromise may be proposed by the Church ofEngland involving – where appropriate– the long-termretention for study of excavated skeletal remains fromChristian burials, in suitably-refurbished disused churchproperty. We shall await this Working Group's findingswith keen interest. The Association has made asubmission, and of course, will ensure that we areinvolved in further rounds of consultation as theWorking Group's policy recommendations are debated.We shall also continue to monitor individualmuseums' retention policies for recently excavatedmaterial, in the post-PPG16 era. In this context, the casefor long-term retention of human remains fromarchaeological sites – and curation is one of the keyfunctions of the museum sector, if also a costly one –must hinge on the demonstration that 'preservation byrecord' cannot be achieved in a single bout of recordingand of sampling for analytical procedures. This is thepoint that also informs the claims for retention that wehave put to the two Working Groups.Coincidentally, in 2003 the Association hasrevived its proposal to compile an up-to-date databaseof curated skeletal remains recovered from Britisharchaeological sites. The Committee decided that thebest way forward was to formulate a template for such adatabase, to invite eligible members to submit bids forgrant funding to implement it, and to underwrite (fromreserves) 'reasonable costs' of maintaining the databasefor the first five years after the grant has expired. Thetemplate is a fusion of that used by Simon Mays indeveloping an earlier, English Heritage-funded databaseof remains from English sites, with that developed byCharlotte Roberts and Margaret Cox in the course ofresearching their recent book on health and disease inBritain (see members publications).We expect that the first such bid will besubmitted in the first half of 2004, and we very muchhope that it will be successful. We can also look forwardto the publication in 2004 of the BABAO document onstandards for skeletal recording. It looks like beinganother interesting year ahead!Finally, I am glad that some members haveraised the issue of accreditation, and specifically of howthe Association might support practitioners inosteoarchaeology by some form of validation ofcredentials. This is an issue that was discussed by theCommittee at a very early stage in the BABAO'sexistence. It is right that we should explore ways ofsupporting the validation of practitioners, since one ofour Constitutional aims is to "improve standards in allaspects of the study of the biological remains of past andpresent peoples". However, our Constitution alsoindicates very clearly that membership of the BABAOshould be open to all those interested in biologicalanthropology and osteoarchaeology. The best way   BABAO Annual Review February 2004 Issue 5 4 forward without compromising our properly broadcriteria for membership would seem to be liaison withthe Institute of Field Archaeologists in defining andvalidating the relevant IFA 'Area of Competence', andwe will write to the IFA to explore the possibilitiesduring 2004.I would like to thank on the Association'sbehalf, all those Committee members, past and present,whose experience and hard work enables the BABAO tocontinue to thrive. A particular thank you must go toRebecca Gowland for her able editing of this Review!Please do not hesitate to contact me if you would like toget more involved yourself, and also if there is any issuewhich you would like the Committee to address on yourbehalf.   British Association forBiological Anthropology andOsteoarchaeologyMembership Report by Margaret Clegg (Membership Secretary)University of Southampton This has been a very good year for membership of theAssociation. In 2003, for the first time we had 210 activemembers. This is an increase over last year of 25members (approx increase of 14%). Seventy-five percentof existing members renewed their subscription in 2003.We seem to have had more success at retaining studentmembers, with only 42% of those not renewing last yearbeing students.We recruited 71 new members during 2003 andhave had six new members so far this year (2004).Overseas subscriptions stand at 32 representing 15% ofthe membership; a large increase in our internationalpresence. Our overseas members come from Canada(10), Europe (14) including: Ireland, Sweden, NorwayGreece, Germany, Hungary, Spain and the Netherlands.We also have two US members, two Australianmembers and one from each of the following: India,Brazil and South Africa.MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIESPERCENTAGEOFMEMBERSHIPStudents26%Academics15%Osteologist/bone specialists11%Anthropologists/archaeologists10%Researchers6%Teachers2%Retired1%Medical1%Work in Museums1%Forensic specialists2%Work in Unit2%No occupation supplied6%Other18%As in previous years we have a diverse range of interestsand occupations among our members. I have included atable below showing a breakdown of some of the largermembership categories, as described by the membersthemselves.In the category of other occupations is includedsuch diverse professions as librarians, administration, ananatomy technician, a writer and a funeral director. Thewide range of occupations and affiliations gives theAssociation a lively and interesting membership.This year I have instituted payment bystanding order and so far 15% of the membership havetaken up this option of paying subscriptions. I am alsohoping to introduce payment by credit card as an optionon the Website in the near future.If anyone has any questions regardingmembership then please contact me at the addressinside the front cover of the review, or you can e-mailme at: M.Clegg@soton.ac.uk ____________________________________________   BABAO Managing CommitteeCall for Nominations by Holgar Schutkowski By the end of September 2004 the following posts onBABAO Managing Committee will be available: POSTPRESENTMEMBER  Publicity SecretaryDarlene WestonGeneral SecretaryHolgerSchutkowskiExisting post holders may stand for re-election. Theduration of service is three years. Nominations must beproposed and seconded, and contain a personalstatement of maximum 100 words by the Nominee.Nominees, proposers and seconders must be BABAOmembers. Please, send nominations to the GeneralSecretary (h.schutkowski@bradford.ac.uk) by Friday,30 th  July. A list of nominations will be sent out to themembers with the Agenda for the Annual GeneralMeeting. ____________________________________________   P EOPLE S UE B LACK  : was appointed Chair of Anatomy andForensic Anthropology at the University of Dundee. M  ARGARET C LEGG : was appointed as ResearchFellow at the Department of Archaeology, University ofSouthampton. M  ARK C OLLARD : was appointed as Lecturer inPalaeoanthropology at the Department of Archaeology,University of Sheffield. S  ARAH  J OHNS AND S COTT L EGGE : were recentlyappointed as lecturers at the Department ofAnthropology, University of Kent.  J ESSICA P EARSON :  was appointed as a Lecturer inBioarchaeology, University of Liverpool.   BABAO Annual Review February 2004 Issue 5 5 ____________________________________________ N EWS AND P ROJECT U PDATES   News from the BritishMuseum by Margaret Judd  During the past 10 years, the Department of AncientEgypt and Sudan at The British Museum and SudanArchaeological Research Society, in collaboration withthe National Corporation of Antiquities and Museumsin Sudan, have excavated numerous cemeteries inCentral Sudan. The skeletal material ranges from theMesolithic to the Medieval Period. The Sudanese join usin encouraging bioarchaeologists to take an interest inSudan and Nubia, an area rich in unexploredarchaeology and bioanthropology. While much of theanalysis is in process, some of the collections are nowavailable for research. Application details can be foundathttp://www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk/aes/aesrestud3.htmlThe following skeletal collections are available: The Wendorf Skeletal Collection The Wendorf Skeletal Collection was excavated duringthe 1963-65 field seasons during the UNESCO HighDam salvage project. Brief field notes, slides, negatives,photographs and correspondence are available, but thesrcinal skeletal analysis notes and data are not includedwith the archive. Because the collection was notsystematically sorted or assessed, a thorough procedurewas required to produce a detailed catalogue entry foreach individual. The new catalogue provides acomprehensive methodology of the analytical protocol;raw data collection notes; concordance tables comparingAnderson’s srcinal 1968 age and sex assessment of thecollection; and quantified preservation inventory tables.We intend to publish this catalogue in the near future.Two groups from Jebel Sahaba and Tushkaform the bulk of the Wendorf skeletal collection. The Jebel Sahaba collection contains 24 females and 19 malesover 19 years of age, in addition to three unaged andunsexed adults. The skulls were reconstructedimmediately after excavation and, therefore,craniometrics are possible although some of theelements have slumped over the years and requireconservation, which is an ongoing project. The dentitionis in excellent condition. The long bones shafts arereasonably preserved, but the epiphyses sustaineddamage during excavation. The remaining postcraniaare fragmentary and in the case of the ribs andvertebrae, nearly nonexistent. There are remains of 13children ranging from foetal to 15 years, but the bonesare extremely fragmentary. The collection is particularlysuited to analyses of the dentition, habitual activity androbusticity. One skeleton was radiocarbon dated in 1988to 13,740bp +/- 600 [Pta-116]; recent efforts to obtainrecent AMS radiocarbon dates were unsuccessful.Tushka was excavated from 1964-66 andskeletons were recovered from cemetery, Site 8905,Locality A. These individuals are very fragmentary andin many cases a soil matrix adheres to the bone, whichrequires extensive conservation. This collection consistsof six male and three female adults, one child, and onemixed context of one female and two males. The North Dongola Reach Survey The majority of the North Dongola Reach skeletons (n =57) were excavated from two Kerma period cemeteriesdating from ca. 2500-1750 BC. Nine of the individualswere juveniles and in a poor state of preservation, whilethe skeletal remains of the adults vary from poor togood. Although many of the bones are broken,particularly the skulls, much information remains to beretrieved. Journal articles have been published in IJOand JAS and a detailed skeletal report is available in: M Judd (2001) The Human Remains, in Life on the DesertEdge, Volume 2. London: Sudan ArchaeologicalResearch Society. Pp. 458-543. (or BAR InternationalSeries 980 (2). Margaret Judd, Curator and BioarchaeologistDepartment of Ancient Egypt and SudanThe British Museum, London, WCiB 3DGmjudd@thebritishmuseum.ac.uk ____________________________________________ The Wellcome OsteologicalResearch Database Project atthe Museum of London by Bill White At the beginning of 2004 newspaper accounts that theMuseum of London was to rebury 17000 to 20000human skeletons were greeted with alarm, disbelief andanger. Not least, by staff in the Museum of Londonitself, who had no knowledge of any such plans. It isnow known that the reports were not based uponinterviews or official press releases, but merely an off thecuff remark by the Museum’s Director that wassurgically separated from its context during over-enthusiastic third-hand reporting.On the contrary, the Museum of London iscommitted to the long-term curation of a uniqueassemblage, the largest collection of scientificallyexcavated and documented human skeletal remainsfrom any urban centre in the world. This huge archivehas accumulated during rescue excavations in theLondon area performed chiefly during the last 30 years.It encompasses all periods from Roman through to theearly nineteenth century and represents an invaluableresource for addressing population-based researchquestions and hypotheses across a range of disciplines.One drawback has been that the material is notwell known internally or externally. That is to say thatfor a large proportion of the sample, funding for analysisto publication level has not been available, or that forskeletons recorded to different standards some yearsago the reports must be regarded as out of date.Accordingly there is a vital need for this large group ofskeletons to be analysed or re-analysed, as appropriate,and for the results to be disseminated to the wideracademic populace. It is still the case that this sample ofdiachronic significance is not widely known. TheMuseum owes a debt to Brian Connell both forarticulating the problem and for inaugurating theremedial process. Just a few years down the line we are nowgrateful to be in the position of having secured a ProjectGrant (No GR070479AIA) from the Wellcome Trust torecord about 5000 of the said skeletons, in large samplesderived from a variety of London sites, directly onto anOracle relational database. The intention is that theresultant database be searchable via its own website.The design of the recording system by Brian Connell
Search
Similar documents
View more...
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks