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Build the SpinScooter

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Build the SpinScooter
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  http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-the-SpinScooter/  Food   Living   Outside   Play   Technology   Workshop Build the SpinScooter by KoolKat  on July 22, 2010 Table of Contents Build the SpinScooter ..........................................................................................................1 Intro: Build the SpinScooter ...................................................................................................2 Step 1: You will need a BMX front wheel and a caster wheel ..........................................................................2 Step 2: Front fork and required bearing hardware ..................................................................................2 Step 3: Find a matching head tube .............................................................................................3 Step 4: Test the fork hardware .................................................................................................3 Step 5: Making a curved frame the easy way ......................................................................................3 Step 6: Weld the elbows to create a frame ........................................................................................4 Step 7: Lay out the rest of the frame ............................................................................................4 Step 8: The rear caster wheel support arm ........................................................................................4 Step 9: Add strength through triangulation ........................................................................................5 Step 10: Rear caster wheel installed ............................................................................................5 Step 11: Head tube welded to the main frame tube .................................................................................5 Step 12: Both wheels installed .................................................................................................6 Step 13: BMX style handlebars work best ........................................................................................6 Step 14: Foot peg options ....................................................................................................6 Step 15: Install the foot platform ...............................................................................................7 Step 16: Carve out some treads on the platform ....................................................................................7 Step 17: Ready to be painted .................................................................................................7 Step 18: Ready to roll! .......................................................................................................8 Step 19: Trying to get into a drift slide ...........................................................................................8 Step 20: Not for those who suffer motion sickness! .................................................................................8 Step 21: Build your own! .....................................................................................................9 Related Instructables ........................................................................................................10 Advertisements ...............................................................................................................10 Comments ................................................................................................................10  http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-the-SpinScooter/  Intro: Build the SpinScooter Once in awhile I get the urge to create a new wild and crazy cycle based on some idea from the many sketches I have collected over the years. Sometimes these bikeswork out as planned, creating new and fun ways to move from point A to point B, and sometimes these creations fail, either in a huge flop, or a blaze of glory where thecrash test pilot becomes acquainted with the pavement. This time, the plan worked out, resulting in a very unique and fun ride that is both challenging to master, andcapable of some off-the-wall maneuvers. Step 1: You will need a BMX front wheel and a caster wheel The SpinScooter is based loosely on our SpinCycle Stunt Trike  , allowing the front wheel to steer the vehicle as normal, but also allowing some out of control steeringby allowing the rear caster to steer the rear of the vehicle. This front and rear steering gives the feeling of riding on ice, or doing a burn-out on a fast motorcycle. Byshifting your weight around and controlling the front wheel, you can get the SpinScooter to do 360s, steer into a drift, or behave like a regular kick scooter. When you arefirst starting out, you will also learn creative ways to fall on your back!As shown in Figure 1, you will require a pair of wheels - a standard front 20 inch BMX wheel and some kind of caster wheel like the ones you would find on the front of ashopping cart. The larger the caster, the more fine control you will have over the scooter, so choose the larger diameter caster wheel you can find. Also, rubber or airfilled caster wheels are better than hard plastic casters for this project. The caster wheel shown in Figure 1 has a diameter of 8 inches and was taken from an oldwheelchair. Step 2: Front fork and required bearing hardware Just about any front fork will work for this project as long as the bearing hardware fits the fork stem. I wanted a bit more height on my scooter, so I chose a beefy looking26 inch front fork as shown in Figure 2. The bearing hardware includes two ball bearings, two bearing cups, a top threaded bearing race, a lock washer and a top nut.Notice that the bottom bearing race is slightly larger than the top, and when installing bearings, the balls go into the cups so that the flat part of the retainer is at facing up.  http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-the-SpinScooter/  Step 3: Find a matching head tube You will also require a head tube that will match the length of the fork stem. A matching head tube will be about 2 inches shorter than the fork stem to allow all of thebearing hardware to install properly. If the head tube is too long, you can always cut off a section, and may also be able to cut a bit of the threaded fork stem if it is toolong. I hacked an old mountain bike frame from the head tube shown in Figure 3, and it looked to be about the right length to match. Step 4: Test the fork hardware When the fork hardware is installed as shown in Figure 4, you should be able to hold the head tube and spin the forks freely with very little friction. If the forks seem tostick, then either your bearings are installed the wrong way or some of the hardware is not of matching size.Yes, like all mechanical things in life, there are several sizes that look almost identical, yet will not work together properly. There is an underground committee ofengineers that meet in secret to ensure that many similar standards exist in order to anger and confuse all those who dare to take things apart. Don't let them defeat you! Important: All welding processes produce fumes and gases to a greater or lesser extent. Galvanized steels produce added fumes from the vaporized zinc coating.Fumes from welding galvanized steel can contain zinc, iron and lead. Use precautions, including high-velocity circulating fans with filters, good ventilation, air respiratorsand fume-extraction systems. Step 5: Making a curved frame the easy way The SpinScooter is a very simple project that can be built using any available 1.5 inch or larger tubing you have on hand. Your only real goal is to place the front wheeland forks in a position similar to that of a regular bicycle, then create some place to plant your feet. The distance between the front and rear caster is about 12-16 inches.Seriously, don't worry about the angles and measurements, just build the scooter using the parts you have on hand. I did not plan any of this project, and there is nodoubt that it can be modified to perform better, so use your imagination and just start cutting up tubing!I had some spare 2 inch conduit elbows in my scrap bin, so I decided to chop them up and welded them end to end in order to make a nice curved frame as can be seenin later photos. To calculate the lengths and dimensions of the main frame, lay the wheels on the ground so that the distance between tire edges is about 12-16 inchesand then fill in the blanks. As for head tube and caster angle, anything between 10 and 15 degrees will work just fine. The slight angle of the caster gives your scooter abit more control for straight line riding, and the head tube angle helps with fine control of the vehicle. Again, feel free to alter these angles to see what happens!  http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-the-SpinScooter/  Step 6: Weld the elbows to create a frame My frame is shaped like the letter S as shown in Figure 6 after cutting and welding the conduit elbows together end to end. Square tubing or heavy bicycle tubing wouldalso work, but tubing with a diameter of less than 1.25 inches might be too thin and could bend, so keep that in mind. To keep the two elbows aligned, they were placedon a flat surface and initially tack welded together. The entire joint was then completed, ensuring proper penetrations for strength. Step 7: Lay out the rest of the frame Figure 7 shows the extent of my plan. Pplace the parts on the ground and fill in the blanks. I wanted my feet to be only a few inches from the ground so that it would beeasy to operate the unit as a standard kick scooter, so the pegs were placed to allow a 3 inch ground clearance, enough to avoid scraping the ground during tight cornersand spins. Also notice how the front head tube is angled slightly forward while the rear caster is angled slightly backwards. This 10-15 degree caster angle allows formore stable control when actually trying to move in a straight line. Step 8: The rear caster wheel support arm To join the rear caster wheel to the frame, a small 1 inch conduit tube was cut to a length of 8 inches and welded to the caster wheel's tiny head tube. If you are using ashopping cart caster, then it will have a bolt, not a head tube and will require a hole to mount it to your frame tubing. A piece of flatbar or angle iron would also work formounting a bolt style caster to your scooter.
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