Abstract

Characteristics of the Text Genre Nonfi ction Text Structure Third-person narrative

Description
LSSON 12 TACHR S GUID Keeping Safe in an arthquake by Kaye Gager Fountas-Pinnell Level O Nonfiction Selection Summary arthquakes can strike at any time. It is important to know what to do when one occurs.
Categories
Published
of 8
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
LSSON 12 TACHR S GUID Keeping Safe in an arthquake by Kaye Gager Fountas-Pinnell Level O Nonfiction Selection Summary arthquakes can strike at any time. It is important to know what to do when one occurs. This book helps readers understand the safety precautions needed to survive an earthquake. Number of Words: 949 Characteristics of the Text Genre Nonfi ction Text Structure Third-person narrative Content Themes and Ideas Language and Literary Features Sentence Complexity Vocabulary Words Illustrations Book and Print Features Photographs or text/graphic features on most pages Safety precautions Protecting yourself during and after an earthquake Creating a plan in case of an earthquake Being prepared for an earthquake is necessary. Staying calm and remembering the safety plan is the best way to overcome an emergency. Descriptive language A mix of short and complex sentences Safety precaution-related terms, such as safety standards, disaster kit, cover, prepared Multisyllable words, such as electricity, emergency, constructed Full-color photographs with captions Twelve pages of text, photographs on most pages Captions Checklist Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S. Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency, Heinemann, Portsmouth, N.H. Copyright by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner unless such copying is expressly permitted by federal copyright law. Permission is hereby granted to individual teachers using the corresponding (discipline) Leveled Readers to photocopy student worksheets from this publication in classroom quantities for instructional use and not for resale. Requests for information on other matters regarding duplication of this work should be addressed to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, Attn: Contracts, Copyrights, and Licensing, 9400 SouthPark Center Loop, Orlando, Florida Printed in the U.S.A If you have received these materials as examination copies free of charge, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company retains title to the materials and they may not be resold. Resale of examination copies is strictly prohibited. Possession of this publication in print format does not entitle users to convert this publication, or any portion of it, into electronic format. 4_308043_BL_VRTG_L012_KeepingSafearthquake.indd 1 11/4/09 10:01:32 AM Keeping Safe in an arthquake by Kaye Gager Build Background Help students use their knowledge of being prepared for emergencies to visualize the selection. Build interest by asking questions such as the following: What type of emergencies could happen in your area? Do you and your family have a safety plan? What type of safety drills do you do here at school? Read the title and author and talk about the cover photograph. xplain many places around the world experience earthquakes. Introduce the Text Guide students through the text, noting important ideas and nonfiction features. Help with unfamiliar language so they can read the text successfully. Give special attention to target vocabulary. Here are some suggestions: Page 3: xplain that this is a book that tells readers how to prepare for and handle an earthquake. Have students look at the picture. Point out that captions can give clues about information in the text. Suggested Language: During an earthquake, rubble can come down quickly, crushing things on the ground. Page 4: Read the caption. Tell students that there are many earthquakes in the San Francisco, California area. Point out San Francisco on a map for students. Pages 5 6: Read the caption on page 6. Discuss with students the importance of having properly constructed buildings that can survive an earthquake. Discuss the photo on page 6. Ask: Do you think this building was built with metal braces or timbers? Why or why not? Page 9: Point out the checklist of ways to be prepared in case of an emergency. Now turn back to the beginning of the selection and read about how to stay safe in an earthquake. constructed built, p. 5 crushing smashing or squashing something, p. 3 debris pieces of broken things, p. 10 possessions items that a person owns, p. 12 rubble broken or crumbled material from a destroyed building, p. 3 slab a broad, flat piece of something, p. 4 tenement low-quality apartment building, p. 5 timbers large pieces of wood used for building, p. 5 trembles shakes, p. 4 wreckage what is left after something has been ruined, p Lesson 12: Keeping Safe in an arthquake 4_308043_BL_VRTG_L012_KeepingSafearthquake.indd 2 11/4/09 10:02:19 AM Read Have students read silently while you listen to individual students read aloud. Support their understanding of the text as needed. Remind students to use the Visualize Strategy imagine what it would be like to experience an earthquake. as they read, and to Discuss and Revisit the Text Personal Response Invite students to share their personal responses to the selection. Suggested language: What important safety precautions did you learn to take during an earthquake? How can you use some of the safety plans that you read about? Ways of Thinking As you discuss the text, help students understand these points: Thinking Within the Text Thinking Beyond the Text Thinking About the Text It is important to instill safety precautions for all types of emergencies. Protecting yourself during and after an earthquake requires staying calm. Creating a plan in case of an earthquake is necessary in order to be prepared. Being prepared for an earthquake is necessary. Staying calm and remembering the safety plan is the best way to overcome an emergency Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S. Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency, Heinemann, Portsmouth, N.H. The graphic and text features provide additional information not included in the text. Captions help to explain the photos. The photos contain a lot of visual information. Choices for Further Support Fluency Invite students to participate in choral reading. Remind students to pay careful attention to phrasing and punctuation, and to use appropriate tone, pitch, and volume as they read different sections of the text. Comprehension Based on your observations of the students reading and discussion, revisit parts of the text to clarify or extend comprehension. Remind students to go back to the text to support their ideas. Phonics/Word Work Provide practice as needed with words and word parts, using examples from the text. xplain to students that adding the suffi xes ed, -ing, and ity to root words changes the meaning and creates a new word. xamples from the text include constructed (p. 5), meeting (p. 7), and electricity (p. 13). Ask students to fi nd other examples of words with suffi xes in the text. 3 Lesson 12: Keeping Safe in an arthquake 4_308043_BL_VRTG_L012_KeepingSafearthquake.indd 3 11/4/09 10:01:55 AM Writing about Reading Vocabulary Practice Have students complete the Vocabulary questions on BLM Responding Have students use their Reader s Notebook to complete the vocabulary activities on page 15. Remind them to answer the Word Teaser on page 16. (Answer: rubble) Reading Nonfiction Nonfiction Features: Photos and Text Clues Remind students that nonfiction has many features to help readers find and understand important information. Photos and text clues are two of these features. xplain that photos, like those in this selection, often add information that is not in the text. Have students look again at the photo on page 6. Ask what information they can learn from the photo (what can happen to a building during an earthquake). Then have students choose another photo in the book and tell what they can learn from it. Text clues are another important source of information. They are verbal clues that signal importance, such as In less than a minute, In just 30 seconds, and Luckily. Have students find these text clues in the book and make a classroom chart. How many text clues can they find? Suggest that students add text clues to the chart from their reading throughout the year. Writing Prompt: Thinking About the Text Have students write a response to the prompt on page 6. Remind them that when they think about the text, they reflect back on the text. They should notice and evaluate language, genre, literary devices, and how the text is organized. Assessment Prompts What words or images in the book help the reader understand what rubble means? What is the main purpose of the selection? What can readers tell about the staying safe during earthquakes from reading this selection? 4 Lesson 12: Keeping Safe in an arthquake 4_308043_BL_VRTG_L012_KeepingSafearthquake.indd 4 11/4/09 10:02:09 AM nglish Language Development Reading Support Pair beginning and intermediate readers to read the text softly, or have students listen to the audio or online recordings. Or have beginning speakers read the captions. Cognates The text includes many cognates. xplain the nglish word and its Spanish equivalent: debris (detrito), possessions (posesiónes), and trembles (temblar). Oral Language Development Check student comprehension, using a dialogue that best matches your students nglish proficiency level. Speaker 1 is the teacher, Speaker 2 is the student. Beginning/arly Intermediate Intermediate arly Advanced/ Advanced Speaker 1: What is this selection about? Speaker 2: staying safe in earthquakes Speaker 1: What is arthquake Country? Speaker 2: the area around San Francisco where a lot of earthquakes occur Speaker 1: Why is it important to have a family meeting place? Speaker 2: After an emergency, families need to have a place to meet so everyone stays safe. Speaker 1: Why should you stay away from windows during an earthquake? Speaker 2: The windows could break and fall on you. Speaker 1: What are the most important things to remember when an earthquake begins? Speaker 2: Remember to drop, cover, and hold on. You should also try not to panic. Name Date Lesson 12 BLACKLIN MASTR 12.1 Keeping Safe in an arthquake Using the words, fill in the crossword puzzle below. Possible responses shown C P O S S S S I O N S W N L C R U S H I N G D A T B C R T T B K U I R A C N M I G T R M B L S Vocabulary trembles possessions tenement crushing debris constructed wreckage rubble timbers slab M D R U B B L N S T Across 2. things you own 5. smashing 9. shakes 10. broken stones Down 1. built 3. flat piece 4. leftover pieces of something ruined 6. pieces of broken things 7. run-down apartment building 8. heavy beams of wood. All rights reserved. 3, Unit 3: Natural ncounters 5 Lesson 12: Keeping Safe in an arthquake 4_308043_BL_VRTG_L12_KeepingSafearthquake.indd 5 1/12/10 5:27:24 PM Name Date Keeping Safe in an arthquake Thinking About the Text Think about the questions below. Then write your answer in one or two paragraphs. Remember that when you think about the text, you reflect back on the text. You notice and evaluate language, genre, literary devices, and how the text is organized. After reading this text, do you think you could stay safe in an earthquake? Did the author include enough information? Is the the information organized and explained clearly? Are the nonfiction features well-chosen? Support your opinion with examples from the text. 6 Lesson 12: Keeping Safe in an arthquake 4_308043_BL_VRTG_L012_KeepingSafearthquake.indd 6 7/28/09 5:54:27 PM Name Date Lesson 12 BLACKLIN MASTR 12.1 Using the words, fill in the crossword puzzle below. Keeping Safe in an arthquake Vocabulary trembles possessions tenement crushing debris constructed wreckage rubble timbers slab Across 2. things you own 5. smashing 9. shakes 10. broken stones Down 1. built 3. flat piece 4. leftover pieces of something ruined 6. pieces of broken things 7. run-down apartment building 8. heavy beams of wood 7 Lesson 12: Keeping Safe in an arthquake 4_308043_BL_VRTG_L12_KeepingSafearthquake.indd 7 1/12/10 5:27:47 PM Student Date Keeping Safe in an arthquake LVL O Lesson 12 BLACKLIN MASTR Keeping Safe in an arthquake Running Record Form page Selection Text rrors Self-Corrections 3 You are sitting in class, about to take a test. Suddenly the classroom starts to shake. You dive under the table. Books are flying everywhere. Desks race across the floor. Materials on the shelves rattle and some drop onto the floor. Papers are strewn everywhere. In less than a minute, the shaking is over, but your classroom looks like a crushing pile of rubble. 4 People who live in San Francisco, California, and other nearby areas are often faced with a similar situation. They live in an area that some call arthquake Country. Comments: Accuracy Rate (# words read correctly/92 100) % Total Self- Corrections Behavior Code rror Read word correctly cat 0 Repeated word, sentence, or phrase Omission cat 0 cat 1 Behavior Code rror Substitution cut cat 1 Self-corrects cut sc cat 0 Insertion the 1 Word told T 1 cat Lesson 12: Keeping Safe in an arthquake 4_308043_BL_VRTG_L012_KeepingSafearthquake.indd 8 7/28/09 5:54:29 PM
Search
Similar documents
View more...
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks