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Communication as Leadership for CIOs

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1. Communication as Leadership for CIO's: Persuasion, Partnership, Progress Leaders create opportunities to ✓ Find common ground ✓ Build alliances ✓ Influence…
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  • 1. Communication as Leadership for CIO's: Persuasion, Partnership, Progress Leaders create opportunities to ✓ Find common ground ✓ Build alliances ✓ Influence action Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 1
  • 2. Speaker and agenda for call Susan K. Becker is a B2B marketing communication consultant and presentation coach. She has extensive experience helping finance and technology professionals to enhance their communication with internal and external audiences. Susan founded Becker Consulting Services in 1985, after several years in banking, and honed her consulting and coaching methods as adjunct Associate Professor of Management Communication in the MBA program at NYU, 1990-2004. Susan has an MBA in Finance from Wharton and a PhD in English from Penn. What will you take away from this call? ✓ Process for audience analysis ➨ appropriate persuasive strategy. ✓ Active listening techniques and negotiation principles to manage conflict and promote interaction and rapport during meetings and Q & A. ✓ Method for structuring your communication and revising it "on your feet," in response to unexpected changes of audience, presentation length, or audience expectations. Presentation flow: Communication principles (audience analysis, persuasion, etc.) ➨ How to apply them in speaking and in presentation ➨ Why communication channels matter and how to use them to your advantage. Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 2
  • 3. Communication for leaders matches Future-State CIO role Future-State CIO =increasingly sophisticated communication competencies Business Strategy ⋕ Influence Action Contribute to business strategy Allocation Partner in business ⋕ Build CIO's transformation Alliances: Time Contribute to organizational change Functional Expertise ⋕ Common Ground: Contribute to organization's success A Typical CIO Future-State CIO Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 3
  • 4. Communication styles: Which is the Future-State CIO's, and why? Disclosure: low Bounded Controls focus, but… Motivates trust but doesn't drive action Seeks Feedback: low Seeks Feedback: high Future-State CIO Direct ive Interactive Drives action but inhibits Two-way exchange promoting clarity and partnership partnership Understand expectations and needs Negotiate contracts Set objectives and priorities Determine performance metrics Disclosure: high Adapted from Cheryl Hamilton with Cordell Parker, Communicating for Results, 4th Edition, Wadsworth Publishing, 1993. Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 4
  • 5. What's different in "communication as leadership"? ➥ Key principle Communication = Relationship + Information Relationship Persuasive Strategy Audience analysis ➥ Key principle Message Solution: the vision, not the detail The message is a statement reflecting values shared with your audience. You make the audience receptive to it by including a hook (WIIFM) tied to the audience's agenda. Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 5
  • 6. What's the analytical process, and how do I know if the result is persuasive and motivating? Relationship: Audience Analysis Expectations of occasion Attitude toward content Length of association with you Relative power or decision-making responsibility Professional background: functional expertise, industry Relationship: Persuasive Strategy Motivation: positive, negative, move neutral audience toward a position Hook (WIIFM): up front Message: overall theme or framing statement accommodates details but does not bog down in them "speaks their language" establishes uniting value or vision "Big Picture" perspective ➥ Message Details of Solution Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 6
  • 7. Interactive communicators use Active Listening Principles to reinforce persuasion through dialogue and audience-focused Q & A ✓Do 1. Take every opportunity to emphasize that you and your questioner share some views: Say "You read my mind," instead of "I'm coming to that." Active listening principles, with examples 2. Assume responsibility for clarity and understanding, and respect your audience: Say "Have I made that clear?" not "Do you understand?" 3. Say why a question is productive, not "That's a good question," which can sound insincere when repeated ritually. If you don't make that comment to every questioner, you can seem insulting to the ones you didn't compliment. Try encouraging comments that enable you to repeat your point: "I'm glad you asked that, because you've given me an opportunity to discuss this important trend from a different perspective." 4. Be explicit about your answers' connection to your audience's agenda: "Yes, we've extended the contract negotiation; the extra time up front defining the project goals and performance metrics will more than pay for itself in efficiencies later." 5. Make your answers clear and memorable by using concrete examples in the form of mini-stories. If your answers use only generic language (“teamwork,” “partnership with business units") you're likely to lose the audience or, worse, sound like everyone else. Audiences remember concrete detail, because they can “see” it. Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 7
  • 8. Active listening techniques promote rapport during dialogue and Q & A Active Listening Technique Example 1. Paraphrase, to show you've heard "If I understand your concerns, they're primarily about data security." 2. Instead of beginning an answer with "No," "I can appreciate your concern about X but validate the questioner before asserting your suggest we emphasize Y, because…." view. 3. Question/confirm to uncover unrecognized "Let's just go over the deliverables one more misunderstandings without conflict. time." 4. Summarize key decisions, for example next "Phase One will conclude with testing of…." steps, to be sure everyone heard the same things. 5. Reframe, to reduce the risk of locking into "Let's focus on what functionality the users conflicting positions. need from this module and come back to exactly how it's going to work." Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 8
  • 9. Active listening: focus on audience's view promotes common ground What is negotiation? "Negotiations proceed through…prudently cooperative communication…[and] commonly follow a recognizable four-step-path: preparation, information exchange, explicit bargaining, and commitment." G. Richard Shell, Bargaining for Advantage: Negotiation Strategies for Reasonable People, revised. Penguin Books, 2006. Negotiation Method ✓ Separate the people from the problem. ✓ Focus on interests, not positions. ✓ Invent options for mutual gain. ✓ Insist on using objective [third-party] criteria to settle differences. Roger Fisher and William Ury, Bruce Patton ed., Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In, 2nd edition. Penguin Books, 1991. Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 9
  • 10. What's an audience-focused presentation as a whole? Presentation Components Persuasive Discussion Overview Flow of story Sequence of main points Relationship of the main points: In saying how they fit together, What's the hook & message? What sequence best suits you explain your thinking, a very your story? important step, if you're in the What's the story? process of earning the audience's Chronology trust. What are the main points (plus Cause ➨ Effect or minus five)? Main & supporting points, in Distinguish main points from Comparison by case: A v B Comparison by criterion sequence supporting points before you Criterion 1: A v B speak, for easy editing "on Conclusion your feet," if audience or Criterion 2: A v B Recommendation or direction. Not allotted time change simply restating your message: unexpectedly. If you've led the audience through definition of your terms, you can use them in conclusion. You've demonstrated leadership! Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 10
  • 11. We've covered interactive style & assertive but adaptable structure Some rules of thumb before discussing communication channel, your third strategic strength: ✓ People like to be asked what they think, what their concerns may be. ✓ People see what they're going to lose far more easily than what you say they'll gain. ✓ Reason is highly over-rated as a factor in human behavior. ✓ Information and expertise are necessary but easily ignored, if unaccompanied by repeated attention to others' needs, which breeds cooperation and, ultimately, trust. ✓ Positive motivation is preferable in persuading, because people tend to move toward what they love and want; when that's unavailable, don't hesitate to unsettle their resistance by raising their fears. Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 11
  • 12. Why are communication channels important? Each has different pro's and con's; if the channel you're assigned doesn't meet your communication objectives, add others that do. Language Degree of detail Transitions, Emphasis Degree of detail Verbal language Body language For the EYE, can be skimmed Accommodates more Longer, more analytical and re-read and finer detail sentences (e.g., a series of Text benefits separated by Can be abstract ("protocol") semi-colons) Complex syntax ("however,") Paragraphing, white space, bullets, italics, underlining "Real-time," for the EAR Organize detail into categories Gestures, pauses, vocal variety Speech Short words, simple sentences Sequence: most important first, Repetition of key words Visual and concrete ("handshake") because people hear the first in Repetition leading to next point Conversational rhythms: easy to a sequence Verbal pointers/markers (repeat hear and to speak key words and phrases, rhetorical questions, start key words with same letter) Conversational titles clarify flow of story Web-based visuals accommodate Visuals (and require) greater detail than Callouts can be a "second voice" Projected slides, Interpretive titles, not labels (e.g., slide #4, above) slides webcast ("downtime declined dramatically in xxxx" v. "downtime x%") Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 12
  • 13. Communication as leadership: all the pieces Message: "The Big Idea" Communicated within first few seconds, simple and succinct Indicates your perspective persuasively by providing common ground even a hostile audience can agree to Introduces theme words or key images Not the same as solution: accommodates details of presentation but doesn't bog down in them Structure Suited to occasion, audience, and communication channel Covers plus/minus five key points Sequence of points or "flow" suited to your material, audience, and purpose Append back-up detail; don't clutter your presentation with it visually or verbally Successful Delivery: Creates an unspoken dialogue Connect with audience: strong start, eye contact, firm stance Demonstrate leadership: cue the audience to key points, instead of moving randomly; "take" the space with gestures scaled to the size of the audience Establish executive presence: results from strategic interplay of voice, gesture, response to audience verbally or with body language, and use of silence for emphasis and to give audience time to "process" Successful Q & A: Creates an actual dialogue Assert leadership by linking back to your message Reinforce rapport using active listening techniques--which buy you time to think on your feet while keeping the focus on your discussion Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 13
  • 14. What characterizes communication as leadership? ✓ Audience-driven strategy and content ✓ Interaction, either actual (Q&A) or implied, through body language ✓ Channel-driven design and delivery For further information… ☛ List of resources on communication and presentation, including brief notes on what each is about and why it's worth a look: www.delicious.com/SusanKBecker. Susan K. Becker, Principal Becker Consulting Services 212 689 1659 skbecker@beckerconsultingsvcs.com www.linkedin.com/in/susankbecker Communication as Leadership, CIO Executive Council Copyright © 2009 by Becker Consulting Services, NY NY. 14
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    Jul 23, 2017
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