Documents

drawingbme

Description
Running head: Drawing BME 1 Drawing Beginning, Middle, and End Jenna L. Oberg University of Lethbridge Drawing BME 2 Lesson Plan Name: Jenna Oberg Grade: 1 Subject: Language Arts Unit: Story E
Categories
Published
of 3
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
  Running head: Drawing BME 1 Drawing Beginning, Middle, and End Jenna L. Oberg University of Lethbridge  Drawing BME 2 Lesson Plan Name: Jenna Oberg Grade: 1 Subject: Language Arts Unit: Story Elements  Topic: Beginning, middle, and end Lesson Duration: 60 minutes Date: March 7th  Outcomes From Alberta Program of Studies General Learning Outcomes: Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to comprehend and respond personally and critically to oral, print and other media texts. Specific Learning Outcomes: 1.   Tell or represent the beginning, middle and end of stories. Learning Objectives 1.   Students will differentiate between the beginning, middle, and end of a story. 2.   Students will plan their own story. Assessment 1.   Participation on the carpet. (L.O. 1) 2.   Illustrations given on graphic organizers. (L.O. 1 and L.O. 2) Learning Resources Consulted Resource #1:  Horton Hatches an Egg by Dr. Seuss Resource #2: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/5b/a3/3c/5ba33c6b15775d4fb74d103c6cf96774.jpg (graphic organizer) Resource #3: Materials and Equipment -   1 graphic organizer for each student. -   Pencils -   A copy of Horton Hatches an Egg by Dr. Seuss Procedure Introduction (2 min.):  Attention Grabber: “We’re going to continue learning about the beginning, middle, and end of a story.”    Assessment of Prior Knowledge: “Who remembers what we learn in each part of the story?”   Expectations for Learning and Behaviour: Students must be listening to the story and not disrupting their peers on the carpet. Transition to Body: “   Let’s read another Dr. Seuss story!”   Body (55 min.): Key Questions: Do students understand the differences between the three story components?   Learning Activity #1: (15 min.)  Drawing BME 3 Students will sit on the carpet while I read Horton Hatches an Egg by Dr. Seuss. After I have read the story I will ask the students to summarize what happened at the beginning, the middle, and the end of the story. We will brainstorm ideas as a class as to how one could illustrate the events that took place in each component.  Assessments/Differentiations: Assessment #1 Learning Activity #2: (40 min.) At their own seats the students illustrate the events that took place in each component of the story, and provide a brief sentence explaining each of their three drawings.  Assessments/Differentiations: Assessment #2 Students who particularly struggle with writing do not have to write the brief sentences to accompany their drawings, but will instead explain the drawings to me orally. Sponge Activity: Students who finish early may work in their free time book or read freely.   Closure (3 min.): Consolidation/Assessment of Learning: How many students were able to finish the activity? Are they illustration aligned with the learned material? Feedback from Students: “Did you try to include all the elements in your drawings  of your own stories?”   Feedback to Students: “I’m excited to take a look at your drawings !”   Transition to Next Lesson: “We’re going to keep working on our story elements but next time we’re going to use a story about spring!”   Reflection: As I have gotten into the classroom it has been difficult to stick to my srcinal lesson plans because I over-estimated what grade ones are able to do in an hour. Instead of reading the story during the writing period, I only read it during our story time earlier in the day, so that the students could have more time to draw their pictures. I had also planned for the students to plan the beginning, middle, and end of their own story during this period, but there was simply no time. The biggest flaw in the execution of this lesson was how I dealt with two students who were out of the room when I read the story that they were supposed to be responding to. I took these students to the carpet and re-read the story to them, and this left all the other student to their own devices. I should have just had these two students reflect on a book that they were already familiar with.  
Search
Similar documents
Tags
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks