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ECE495-Lec11_.ppt

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ECE495: Nanotechnology Lecture 11 Nanoelectronics III: Nanoscale Electronics ECE495: Nanotechnology Lecture 3 in Nanoelectronics 2 Background Current State of Microelectronics and Extensions to the nanoscale Nanotechnology-based Strategies ECE495: Nanotechnology Background ã Top-down and bottom-up. ã Fabrication of future nanotechnology devices is expected to take place from the bottom up. Top-down manufacturing is a reductionist manufacturing philosophy. This approach sta
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  ECE495: Nanotechnology Lecture 11 Nanoelectronics III: Nanoscale Electronics  ECE495: Nanotechnology Lecture 3 in Nanoelectronics 2 Background Current State of Microelectronics and Extensions to the nanoscale Nanotechnology-based Strategies  ECE495: Nanotechnology Background ã Top-down and bottom-up. ã Fabrication of future nanotechnology devices is expected to take place from the bottom up. Top-down manufacturing is a reductionist manufacturing philosophy. This approach starts from the system description down to the physical layouts of the devices. ã Moore’s law.   ã In 1997, Gordon Moore pointed out that there were probably five more generations (at 18 months per generation) left of improvements down the track, following his own “Moore’s law” before processes run into the wall of physical limitations. ã This implies that the ability of the industry to double the computing power of a microchip within that period could conservatively begin a noticeable slowdown in the mid-2000s. 3  ECE495: Nanotechnology Current State of Microelectronics and Nanoelectronics ã Physical limitations of manufacturing. ã The performance was seen to be at its limits, and this, in fact can be considered as another attribute of the new age of nanoelectronics, namely that, the generation of these sub-100 nm lateral structures and billions of these on a wafer would require a lithography beyond short-wavelength refractive optics-based patterning. ã It is natural that the scaling law cannot be applied linearly. Although following Lambda rule, the technology was successful to implement for a very small lambda fraction. Even though, Moor’s law can not be followed further due to the physics limitations of the device. The transistor size could not follow for reasons of manufacturing tolerance, and its switching speed did not follow for physical reasons. Therefore, industry had to embrace a more diversified and sophisticated strategy to produce miniature, low-power, high-performance chip-size products. 4
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