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Eng-Tips_ Metal and Metallurgy engineering - Dual Rated Pipe & Fittings.pdf

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10/6/2014 Eng-Tips: Metal and Metallurgy engineering - Dual Rated Pipe & Fittings http://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=124121 1/2 Smart questions Smart answers Smart people Go Find A Forum Go Join Directory Search Tell A Friend Whitepapers Jobs Home Forums Materials Engineers Materials Metal and Metallurgy engineering Forum Dual Rated Pipe & Fittings thread330-124121 magusinp (Electrical) (OP) 17 May 05 10:28 Whenever we receive pipe & fittings dual rated as 316/316L , for exa
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  10/6/2014Eng-Tips: Metal and Metallurgy engineering - Dual Rated Pipe & Fittingshttp://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=1241211/2 Smart questionsSmart answersSmart people GoFind A ForumGo Join DirectorySearchTell A FriendWhitepapersJobsHome > Forums > Materials Engineers > Materials > Metal and Metallurgy engineering Forum Dual Rated Pipe & Fittings thread330-124121 magusinp  (Electrical) (OP) 17May0510:28Whenever we receive pipe & fittings dual rated as 316/316L , for example, does that ALWAYS mean that the allowable stress will be the HIGHER ratingof the two? The pipe distributor said it's true & I looked at a few MTR's and the mechanical test Tensile Strength & Yield Strength were the highervalues. I need to know if I can go ahead and design base on the higher value.  metengr  (Materials)17May0513:55If pipe or fittings are dual certified for use, yes you can take credit for the higher strength value. What is your application regarding allowable stress orare you interchanging allowable stress value with tensile strength on the MTR?  stanweld  (Materials)17May0514:27Temperature limitations are imposed by a number of Codes which mandate minimum carbon content. So as long as the design temperature is less thanthat requiring a minimum .04% C content; e.g. B31.3 Appendix A Notes 27 and 28. In short you must check the design allowables in the the applicableCode. magusinp  (Electrical) (OP) 17May0516:10Thank you all for your help. metengr, stanweld, I am not using the MTR values for anything except to verify that the pipe was rated to the highertensile strength. The allowable stress from Table A1 of B31.3 is the applicable value. It's just that the difference between the allowable for 316L and316 is 3300 psi!By the way, I am in the unenviable position of verifying the Code conformance of a design that's been in use for 50 years but evidently no one everactually qualified it. So I sincerely want to be able to show that the legacy design is safe. metengr  (Materials)17May0516:35I would use a limiting or more conservative approach, such as either lower allowable stress value or service temperature limitation as mentioned by stanweld  in Table A-1, if applicable, in B31.3 for evaluating dual certified material. If the limiting condition(s) is acceptable, this would indicate thedesign is safe for dual certified material. Linepipe  (Materials)18May0514:37   (2)   Share This  10/6/2014Eng-Tips: Metal and Metallurgy engineering - Dual Rated Pipe & Fittingshttp://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=1241212/2 Dual certified materials can be used at either rating. In your case you will want to look at the welding that was used to ensure the welds are not thelimiting factor.Join | Indeed Jobs |  Advertise Copyright © 1998-2014 ENGINEERING.com, Inc. All rights reserved.Unauthorized reproduction or linking forbidden without expressed written permission.
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