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FILM EDUCATION. BFI Research and Statistics PUBLISHED DECEMBER Image: Boogaloo and Graham courtesy of Out of Orbit. Photographer: Helen Sloan

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FILM EDUCATION BFI Research and Statistics PUBLISHED DECEMBER 2015 Image: Boogaloo and Graham courtesy of Out of Orbit. Photographer: Helen Sloan FILM EDUCATION FILM EDUCATION OFFERS CHILDREN AND YOUNG
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FILM EDUCATION BFI Research and Statistics PUBLISHED DECEMBER 2015 Image: Boogaloo and Graham courtesy of Out of Orbit. Photographer: Helen Sloan FILM EDUCATION FILM EDUCATION OFFERS CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE OPPORTUNITIES TO WATCH, UNDERSTAND AND MAKE FILMS TO ENRICH THEIR LIVES, FOSTER PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT, EXPRESS THEIR CREATIVITY AND GAIN ESSENTIAL SKILLS. FOR ADULT LEARNERS, FILM EDUCATION CAN ALSO BE A STIMULATING PART OF LIFELONG LEARNING. FACTS IN FOCUS In 2014/15, over 12,000 schools and almost 425,000 children and young people participated in the Into Film programme across the UK. In 2014/15, just under 91,000 students were entered for GCSE and A Level media studies related courses and over 4,200 students were entered for Scottish Intermediate/National and Higher courses. There were over 21,500 entries for higher education media related courses in 2013/14 (the last year for which data is available). In 2014/15, the BFI Film Academy provided opportunities for over year olds to develop new skills and build careers in the film industry. A study conducted by the Moving Image Training Alliance found over 160 organisations working in participatory filmmaking with children and young people across the UK, reaching an estimated 35,000+ learners a year. LEARNING ABOUT AND THROUGH FILM Film education takes place in both formal and informal settings, from schools and colleges to voluntary interest groups like youth clubs and film societies. Film is a rich and versatile medium for exploring subjects in the classroom and elsewhere, as well as a worthwhile and rewarding object of study in its own right. Over the past few years, the BFI has worked with a range of partners in the private, cultural and education sectors to help forge an overarching strategy for film education in the UK. The emerging plan upholds the belief that in the new digital landscape, the moving image should be acknowledged as having the same educational value as the printed text, and that film should be integrated into all forms of education, learning, training, cultural appreciation and understanding. FILM ON UK TELEVISION This report presents the most up-to-date record of film education related data currently available, beginning with a look at activity in formal education settings. FILM EDUCATION IN FORMAL EDUCATION SETTINGS In practice, film education activity has traditionally involved watching and listening to a range of film texts, discussing and analysing them; generating discursive and written work, storyboards and scripts; making films; and re-purposing archive material. Outside of dedicated film and media studies courses, film is increasingly used in other parts of the curriculum, such as science, English or modern languages. In 2013, FILMCLUB and First Light, providers of film education and filmmaking opportunities for children and young people, merged to form Into Film, a charity focused on making film an integrated part of education for 5-19 year olds. Supported by the BFI and a range of other funders, Into Film represents one of the largest ever investments in film education for the formal sector and is intended to create a critical shift from film education work around the school to work within the classroom 1. This is done primarily through providing educational resources to support the current curriculum: incorporating film-based resources into lessons and providing resources for watching, making and learning about film within the network of schools film clubs. In 2014/15, Into Film trained and enabled 11,202 teaching professionals and youth leaders to work with film across the curriculum (including film studies) and 103,070 sets of educational resources were downloaded. Within the supported film clubs, 1,036 films were made over the year and a total of 8,658 children and young people participated in filmmaking activities. The total number of schools participating in the Into Film programme has risen by 51% from 8,076 in 2013/14 to 12,134 in 2014/15 (Table 1.1). The reach of the programme has also increased, from 281,960 pupils in 2013/14 to 424,690 pupils in 2014/15. 1 Impact, Relevance and Excellence: a new stage for film education, BFI 2014 BFI Statistical Yearbook Table 1.1 National/regional distribution of Into Film schools, 2013/14 and 2014/ / /15 Nation/region Number of Into Film schools % of Into Film schools Number of Into Film schools % of Into Film schools England 6, , London 1, , South East , North West , South West , East Midlands West Midlands Yorkshire and The Humber East of England North East Scotland Wales Northern Ireland Isle of Man No nation/region stated Total 8, , Source: Into Film Into Film s flagship event is the annual Into Film Festival, a UK-wide programme of free film screenings and related activities for children and young people. The festival, which was launched as the National Youth Film Festival in 2013, aims to build on the success of National Schools Film Week previously run by the industry-funded charity Film Education, which closed in April Table 1.2 shows attendances by children and young people for National Schools Film Week and the Into Film Festival between 2009 and In 2014, over 317,000 children and young people and over 54,000 education professionals attended the festival. It showed 151 UK and international films at 2,700 screenings in 507 cinemas across the UK, and hosted 120 special events (previews, Q&As with industry professionals, careers talks and filmmaking workshops) aimed at expanding young people s understanding and engagement with film. Table 1.2 Attendances at National Schools Film Week and the Into Film Festival, National Schools Film Week 392, , , ,744 Into Film Festival 246, ,189 Source: Film Education, Into Film 4 - BFI Statistical Yearbook 2015 In terms of film and media specific subjects taught in schools and colleges, there has been an 8% decrease in the overall number of students entering GCSE media, film or TV studies in England, Wales and Northern Ireland since 2008/09 (Table 1.3). Total year on year entries have declined each year with the exception of 2013/14, although there has been an opposite trend in Northern Ireland, which has mainly seen year on year increases in the numbers of entries. Overall entries in 2014/15 were just under 62,500, around 1% of all GCSE entries. Table 1.3 Entries for GCSE media/film/tv studies in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, 2008/ /15 FILM EDUCATION Number of media/film/tv studies entries England Wales Northern Ireland Total All GCSE entries 2008/09 63,685 3, ,972 5,669, /10 63,134 3, ,764 5,469, /11 62,915 3,357 1,161 67,433 5,151, /12 57,451 2,905 1,324 61,680 5,225, /13 55,005 2,659 1,450 59,114 5,445, /14 59,536 2,456 1,444 63,436 5,217, /15 58,496 2,350 1,606 62,452 5,277,604 % change 2013/ / % change 2008/ / Source: Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) Notes: These numbers, published in August 2015, are provisional and do not include the results from any appeals, declines or late cash-ins. Scotland is not included because of its separate examinations system. Meanwhile, the number of entries for Scottish Intermediate Levels 1 and 2/National Levels 4 and 5 media studies has increased almost every year since 2009 (Table 1.4). In total, there were just under 3,200 entries in 2015, 0.7% of all equivalent level entries, and an increase of 46% compared with Since 2009 there has been a 149% increase in the number of entries. This increase may be partly explained by the changes in the Scottish qualifications system and curriculum in recent years. Table 1.4 Entries for Scottish Intermediate/National Level media studies, Number of media studies entries Intermediate Level 1/ National Level 4 entries Intermediate Level 2/ National Level 5 entries Total Intermediate Level 1/ National Level 4 all entries Intermediate Level 2/ National Level 5 all entries All equivalent level entries ,274 65, , , ,434 69, , , ,373 72, , , ,429 74, , , ,531 69, , , , , , , , , , , , ,123 % change % change Source: Scottish Qualifications Authority Note: These numbers, published in August 2015, are provisional and do not include the results from any appeals, declines or late cash-ins. BFI Statistical Yearbook The overall number of students taking GCE A Level media, film or TV studies in England, Wales and Northern Ireland has fallen by 16% since 2008/09 (Table 1.5). As with GSCE entries, there is an opposite trend in Northern Ireland, where entries have risen by 35% over the period. The total number of entries in 2014/15 was just under 28,500. Table 1.5 Entries for GCE A Level media/film/tv studies in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, 2008/ /15 Number of media/film/tv studies entries England Wales Northern Ireland Total All A level entries 2008/09 31,618 1, , , /10 31,032 1, , , /11 31,400 1,403 1,052 33, , /12 29,682 1,288 1,141 32, , /13 26,848 1,191 1,073 29, , /14 26,116 1,247 1,134 28, , /15 26,036 1,224 1,207 28, ,749 % change 2013/ / % change 2008/ / Source: Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) Note: See notes to Table 1.3. The number of entries for Scottish Higher media studies increased every year between 2009 and 2014, but decreased slightly in Overall, since 2009 entries have increased by 42%. Table 1.6 Entries for Scottish Higher media studies, Number of media studies entries All Higher entries , , , , , , , , ,850 % change % change Source: Scottish Qualifications Authority Note: See note to Table BFI Statistical Yearbook 2015 Study of the moving image and allied creative industries remains popular in UK higher education, through film and media studies courses. Over 21,500 students were enrolled on such courses in 2013/14 (the latest year for which data are available), a slight increase on the number of entries in 2012/13 (Table 1.7). Entries for media studies courses peaked in 2011/12 at over 19,700, but since then there has been a sharp decline, with the number of entries falling to 15,640 in 2013/14. Film studies entries have increased almost year on year over the period; in 2013/14 there were 4,640 entries compared with 3,815 in 2008/09, a rise of 22%. The number of students undertaking film production courses has seen the largest increase over the period (146%), rising from 530 in 2008/09 to 1,305 in 2013/14. FILM EDUCATION Table 1.7 Higher education students in film and media studies, 2008/ /14 Media studies Film studies Film production Total 2008/09 17,595 3, , /10 19,190 4, , /11 19,690 4, , /12 19,745 4, , /13 15,780 4,570 1,040 21, /14 15,640 4,640 1,305 21,585 % change 2013/ / % change 2008/ / Source: HESA Notes: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) Limited HESA cannot accept responsibility for any inferences or conclusions derived from the data by third parties. Figures have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 5. Includes first degree, post-graduate and other degrees. Media studies related courses include media, film, television, radio, electronic and print-based media studies courses. Many of the film and media related further and higher education courses have been accredited (via the Tick quality mark) by Creative Skillset, the UK-wide strategic skills body for the creative industries. The Creative Skillset Tick is an assurance that courses provide the most up-to-date and relevant industry training and education. In 2014/15, 216 accredited courses were offered across the UK, the majority of which were higher education programmes. These included 27 courses in film production, nine courses in screenwriting and four courses in post-production. FILM EDUCATION AS A PROGRESSION ROUTE Learning about film can be enhanced by practical involvement in filmmaking. In addition to the development of critical, creative and cultural skills, gaining filmmaking experience, particularly at an early age, can be a key stepping stone to the development of a career in the film industry. In 2012, the BFI launched a Film Academy programme, supported now by the Department for Education in England, National Lottery, Creative Scotland and Northern Ireland Screen, which was designed to help year olds develop the necessary skills to enter the film industry. Over its first three years the Academy has provided opportunities for talented young people from a range of backgrounds to enjoy out-of-school and residential filmmaking experience, delivered through partner organisations across the UK and with industry bodies such as BAFTA, Creative Skillset and Pinewood Studios. In 2014/15 the Academy worked with 42 delivery partners reaching 783 young people UK wide (Table 1.8). Across all courses in 2014/15, 27% of participants were from black and minority ethnic backgrounds and 7% were disabled. BFI Statistical Yearbook Table 1.8 BFI Film Academy participants, 2012/ /15 Nation/region 2012/ / /15 England North East Yorkshire and The Humber North West West Midlands East Midlands East of England London South East South West Wales Scotland Northern Ireland Total Source: BFI OTHER FILM EDUCATION ACTIVITY In addition to the activity described above, there are many other organisations involved in the delivery of film education in the UK at both a national and regional level including independent cinemas, regional film archives, training providers and community-based groups. In 2014, the Moving Image Training Alliance (MITA), supported by Into Film, conducted a UK-wide research project 2 designed to audit and map independent training provision in the moving image, with a particular focus on organisations working with 5-19 year olds. The research found a well-established sector across the UK (over 160 organisations participated in the study) that engages with an estimated 35,000+ young people annually. The majority of responding organisations (96%) supported young people from marginalised and disadvantaged backgrounds including young offenders and NEET, SEN, BAME and disabled individuals. In addition to children and young people, most of the organisations also worked with adults. Responding organisations delivered many types of training from short to long courses, and in a variety of settings. The majority of organisations (88%) provided courses for young people outside of school settings and 56% worked with the school curriculum. Of the organisations working with young people, 93% offered an introductory filmmaking course. Other key areas of provision were craft/production skills training in camera (84%), editing (82%), production (81%), and sound (79%). A number of the responding organisations were involved in the delivery of training through the BFI Film Academy. The BFI continues to run programmes for learners of all ages at BFI Southbank. Table 1.9 provides details of some of the BFI s main education activities. Due to changes in reporting since the last edition of the Yearbook, BFI Southbank and BFI festivals education events have been merged. 2 TRAINING THE NEXT GENERATION, Moving Image Training Alliance (MITA), 8 - BFI Statistical Yearbook 2015 In 2014/15 there were 48,365 admissions to BFI Southbank and festivals education events, an increase from 44,641 admissions in 2013/14 and up 32% on 2008/09. The number of visits to the BFI Reuben Library increased from 69,592 in 2013/14 to 72,502 in 2014/15. (Visits to the Library increased substantially between 2011/12 and 2012/13 following its relocation from the BFI head office to BFI Southbank.) BFI Screenonline is a web-based encyclopaedia of British film and television featuring hundreds of hours of clips from the BFI National Archive, supplemented by contextual material, stills, posters and press books. Users in UK schools, colleges, universities and libraries can access the entire site for free; in 2014/15 there were 28,263 video streaming requests. FILM EDUCATION Table 1.9 BFI education activities, 2008/ /15 BFI Southbank and festivals education event admissions 2008/ / / / / / /15 % change 2013/ /15 36,697 38,569 43,532 42,000 43,363 44,641 48, BFI Reuben Library visits 12,024 10,969 10,983 11,900 62,000 69,592 72, BFI Screenonline video 172, ,194 92,020 80,000 49,853 36,038 28, streaming requests Source: BFI BFI Statistical Yearbook 21 Stephen Street, London W1T 1LN bfi.org.uk/statistics
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