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IMPRIMIR web quest.pdf

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1 UNIVERSIDAD CENTRAL DEL ECUADOR SEDE SANTO DOMINGO Career: English 6 th Subject: DIDACTICS Topic: WebQuest Date: 22/10/2014 Name: Darwin Loor Professor: Msc. Peter Chavarría WebQuests: Definitions and Features Since the mid 1990s, educators have looked for ways to make effective use of the vast information resources available on the Web. Rather than low-level scavenger- hunt types of activities, teachers have sought ways to
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    1 UNIVERSIDAD CENTRAL DEL ECUADOR SEDE SANTO DOMINGO Career:   English  6 th    Subject:   DIDACTICS Topic:  WebQuest Date:    22/10/2014 Name:  Darwin Loor Professor: Msc. Peter Chavarría   WebQuests: Definitions and Features Since the mid 1990s, educators have looked for ways to make effective use of the vast information resources available on the Web. Rather than low-level scavenger-hunt types of activities, teachers have sought ways to promote higher-order thinking through authentic assignments that emphasized inquiry-based learning. WebQuest Definition and History Bernie Dodge, a Professor of Education at San Diego State University, coined the term “WebQuest” in 1995 to describe an inquiry -based activity that involves students in using web-based resources and tools to transform their learning into meaningful understandings and real-world projects. Rather than spending substantial time using search tools, most or all of the information used by learners is found on pre-selected websites. Students can then focus on using web-based information to analyze, synthesis, and evaluate information to address high-level questions. Types of WebQuests  WebQuests come in two forms, Short Term and Long Term. Both use similar principles and methods but are used for different purposes. Short Term WebQuests A short term WebQuest is designed to be completed over one to three lessons. Its aim is for the learner to have been introduced to a significant amount of new information and to have come to some understanding of it.    2 The attributes of a short term WebQuest are:    knowledge acquisition and integration    making sense of large amounts of information    typically completed in one to three class periods. Long Term WebQuests A longer term WebQuest will usually take between one week and a month of school time, though they may be extended over longer periods if desired. Its aim is for the learner to have been introduced to new information and to have analysed it thoroughly. From this analysis, learners extend the subject in some way and then demonstrate their understanding through a response The attributes of a long term WebQuest are:    extending and refining knowledge    analyzing a body of knowledge thoroughly and transforming it    creating a product that others can respond to    typically completed in one week to a month. WebQuests are designed:    From the perspective of student/learner    As coherent and relevant units - either as short term lessons (a few days/lessons) to long term projects    With a whole to part organisation    With the teacher as facilitator    With learning through the active construction of meaning    For flexible environments, and    To support learners' thinking at the levels of analysis, synthesis and evaluation Components of a webquest   Every WebQuest has six basic components:    Introduction.  This is an overview (often a simple one) of what is to come. Many WebQuests take place within a story setting; in these instances, the Introduction is where the plot and characters are introduced.    3    Task.  This page details the assignment that is to come. Tasks are often comprised of numbered lists of items that must be accomplished to complete the quest.    Process . The Process is the meat of the quest —  it is here that students work together, develop plans of action, and find ways to solve the presented problem. Often, quest processes may involve role-playing and other off-line methods.    Evaluation . The evaluation phase centers on a “rubric,” a carefully designed chart listing goals for the quest and the standards by which performance will be measured. This can be thought of as a great widening of the typical letter grade usually given to classroom assignments. Rubrics are highly annotated “grades” with extensive annotation detailing many aspects of the project.      Conclusion.  This is a brief summary, usually congratulatory in tone, that wraps up the project.    Teacher Page . Instructors are provided with their own subsection of the WebQuest site, with instructions for each of the above sections. Teachers who develop WebQuests often fill this section with information to help other educators adapt the quest to their own class. References: http://eduscapes.com/sessions/travel/define.htm http://zunal.com/zunal-help/help-about-whatiswebquest.php http://www.webquestdirect.com.au/whatis_awq.asp http://tecnologiaedu.uma.es/materiales/wq/archivos/cap1_WQ__Definicion.pdf  http://www.teacherweb.com/tweb/webquests.aspx 
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