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Intonation Romeo and Julet

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  Romeo and Juliet   © www.teachitworld.com 2010 13720 Page 1 of 4 This resource has been adapted from Tombola  (Nelson, 1992) by kind permission of the authors, John Palim, Paul Power and Phyllis Vannuffel Level Suitable for teenagers and young adults, at intermediate level and above. Timing Main activity : 45 minutes. Extension a : 15 minutes. Extension b : 20–30 minutes. Extension c : 20–30 minutes. Aims Main activity : rhythm and intonation; making arrangements. Extension a : adverbs of manner: arrogantly, coolly, enthusiastically, dismissively, persuasively, excitedly, slightly interested, admiringly, passionately.   Extension b : reported speech: asked, told, replied, suggested.   Extension c : writing. Steps 1.   Tell the class they are going to hear a dialogue between a girl and a boy. Read the poem to the class with clear intonation, demonstrating the attitudes of the two speakers.    / / / / So I said to her ‘What’s your name?’ (arrogantly)  / / / / She said to me ‘What’s your game?’ (coolly)  / / / / So I said to her ‘I think you’re great.’ (enthusiastically)  / / / / She replied ‘You’re too late.’ (dismissively)  / / / / So I said to her ‘Will you come out tonight?’ (persuasively)  / / / / She said to me ‘Are you all right?’ (sarcastically)  / / / / So I said to her ‘Let’s fix a time.’ (persuasively)  / / / / She replied ‘I could do nine.’ (coolly)  Romeo and Juliet   © www.teachitworld.com 2010 13720 Page 2 of 4 This resource has been adapted from Tombola  (Nelson, 1992) by kind permission of the authors, John Palim, Paul Power and Phyllis Vannuffel  / / / / So I said to her ‘Where shall we go?’ (excitedly)  / / / / She said to me ‘How should I know?’ (dismissively)  / / / / So I said to her ‘We’ll go in my car.’ (boastfully)  / / / / She replied ‘Will we go far?’ (slightly interested)  / / / / So I said to her ‘I drive a Rolls Royce’ (boastfully)  / / / / She said to me ‘I like your choice’ (admiringly)  / / / / So I said to her ‘I’ve got lots of money’ (coolly)  / / / / She replied ‘I love you Honey’ (passionately) 2.   Ask questions to check the students’ comprehension. For example: Does he like her? Does  she like him? What happened in the end? 3.   Repeat the verse line by line and tell the class to help you write the lines on the board, including the stress marks.   4.   Tell the class to repeat the lines after you. Check individual repetitions.   5.   Ask students to practise the lines in pairs, preferably a girl and a boy. Go round checking pronunciation, especially intonation.   6.   One pair can come to the front of the class and act out the direct speech only.   Extension a: adverbs of manner 1.   After step 3 above, give each pair of students a set of the adverbs cards from page 4. 2.   Check they know the meaning of each adverb. 3.   Read the poem line by line and ask students to put them in order according to how each line was said. Allow students time to discuss each line before moving on to the next. 4.   Finally, read the poem one more time without stopping so students can agree on their definitive answer. 5.   Give whole class feedback. There may be several possible answers, for instance, arrogantly   and boastfully   could be interchangeable as could coolly   and dismissively  .  Romeo and Juliet   © www.teachitworld.com 2010 13720 Page 3 of 4 This resource has been adapted from Tombola  (Nelson, 1992) by kind permission of the authors, John Palim, Paul Power and Phyllis Vannuffel Extension b: reported speech After practising intonation (step 6 above), ask students to help you write the first line of the dialogue in reported speech. Example:   I asked her what her name was.   Tell students to continue reporting the dialogue in pairs, the boys writing the first line, the girls the second and so on. If necessary, model told, asked, suggested  etc. before setting the task. Extension c: writing    Ask students in pairs to make their own dialogue using the lines. Example:   So I said to her    She said to me,   etc. They should read or act these out to the rest of the class. The lines do not have to rhyme, but you could give suggestions to any pair who are trying to make rhymes.  Romeo and Juliet   © www.teachitworld.com 2010 13720 Page 4 of 4 This resource has been adapted from Tombola  (Nelson, 1992) by kind permission of the authors, John Palim, Paul Power and Phyllis Vannuffel admiringly arrogantly boastfully boastfully coolly coolly coolly enthusiastically excitedly dismissively dismissively passionately persuasively persuasively sarcastically slightly interested
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