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IT PEDESTRIAN PROJECT AWARD Broadway Diamondback PedestrianlBicycle Bridge SUMMARYSHEET

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IT PEDESTRIAN PROJECT AWARD Broadway Diamondback PedestrianlBicycle Bridge SUMMARYSHEET Proiect Obiectives and Results In the pedestrian experience, beauty and details matter. - Simon Donovan, Artist The
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IT PEDESTRIAN PROJECT AWARD Broadway Diamondback PedestrianlBicycle Bridge SUMMARYSHEET Proiect Obiectives and Results In the pedestrian experience, beauty and details matter. - Simon Donovan, Artist The Broadway Diamondback Bicycle/Pedestrian Bridge project s objective was to bridge a busy intersection (34,500 vehicles per day) with a structure that resembles a Diamondback rattlesnake as a key link in a citywide pedestrian path system. The Diamondback Bridge had been in the planning stages since the acceptance of the Downtown (Tucson) Land Use and Circulation Study in The goal of this land use study was to connect people and places and thereby create a vibrant downtown area. The Diamondback Bridge provides continuous safe pedestrian access throughout Downtown Tucson and is a significant part of a larger city.wde pedestrian network that links the Northwest side to the Southeast side of Metropolitan Tucson. On May 23, 2002, City Officials, project team members, business representatives, neighbors, school children, representatives from the local baseball teams, news media and others celebrated the completion of the bridge with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. At the ceremony, the bridge received a traditional Native American Tohono O odham blessing to signify its linking of art, culture, and transportation. Participating Organizations and Project Sponsors Many individuals and organizations listed below contributed to the successful completion of this new Tucson, Arizona landmark: + City of Tucson Department of Transportation + Simon Donovan, Artist + Arizona Department of Transportation + Tucson Pima Arts Council + The Barraza-Aviation Parkway Citizens Advisory Committee + TY Lin International Structural Engineers, Designer + Hunter Contracting Company + Transcore, General Consultant + Tucson s citizens for their support of the bold concept of a bridge shaped like a snake. Project Costs Funds to construct the Diamondback Bridge came from various funding sources, including local funds, matching Transportation Enhancement Funds that could only be used for pedestrian and bicycle facilities, and Federal Highway Surface Transportation Program (STP) Funds. The final project cost was $2.5 million. Project Duration The Diamondback Bridge had been in the planning stages since the Mayor and Council approval of the Downtown (Tucson) Land Use and Circulation Study (DLUCS) in 1993 and was opened to the public 9 years later in The DLUCS General Plan included plans for vehicular traffic, bicycles, pedestrians, bus transit, historic trolley and parking in the downtown area. In 1996, the City of Tucson began the planning and design of the Broadway Arroyo Chico Landscape Project, which included landscape, pedestrianhicycle facilities, and neighborhood mitigation. Local Artist Simon Donovan and his proposal of a Diamondback Bridge were selected in 1997 at which time the project went through an extensive community education and outreach process. The Design Concept Report for the bridge was completed in ApriZ 2998 and the Design Plans were completed in August Project plans went through a value engineering process, were redesigned and completed in March Final design plans went to bid in February Construction began in ApriZ 2002 and the Diamondback Bridge was opened to the public on May 23,2002. Proiects that enhance existing or provide for new pedestrian facilities in the planning, desiminp, operating, maintenance stages; Walking through the belly of a giant rattlesnake, with 1 1 -foot high fangs, eyes that light up, and a tail that rattles, offers an unforgettable experience to Tucsonans and visitors as they safely cross six lanes of traffic at Broadway Boulevard. The Diamondback Bridge project marked the first time the City of Tucson Department of Transportation accepted an artist s concept before engineers actually designed the project. Transforming the sinuous shape of a snake into a functional bridge presented the challenge of blending an artistic concept with engineering and construction ingenuity. The structure also serves as a distinctive gateway feature into Downtown Tucson and is fast becoming a landmark and tourist attraction. Projects like the bridge allow us to solve the functional problenis of our city at the sanre tinre as we make it an exciting place to be. It gives the city identity. Zt beconies a landnrark - local architect The Diamondback Bridge is a post-tensioned, box girder concrete structure with bridge fencing material painted with a diamond pattern to simulate snakeskin. The bridge is 11 feet tall, 14 feet across, 280 feet long, and allows for a 17-foot clearance above Broadway Boulevard. Pedestrians can make their way through the bridge via the tail or between the fangs of the open-mouthed rattler. The %foot high snakehead includes lifelike, translucent eyes that light up and the 20-foot high tail is equipped with a 300-pound fiberglass rattle. Motion sensors installed near the rattle detect users presence on the bridge, which triggers a realistic rattling sound effect. The bridge has a unique rounded underside concrete superstructure with striped rustication that resembles a diamondback s belly. The concrete abutments and center pier are faced with natural rock veneer to blend into the southwest desert landscape. Pedestrian fencing completes the snake-like body using circular tube-steel framing and expanded metal fencing. The tube steel framing creates a diamond pattern much like the diamonds found on a snake s back while the grating suggests a scaly skin. The changing light and shadows on the open weave fencing gives the viewer the impression of movement. The expanded bridge fence canopy presents the pedestrian with an unobstructed, panoramic view of Downtown Tucson and the Catalina Mountains and provides a cool cross breeze on a hot summer day. At night, the interior lighting accentuates the rattler s diamond pattern outlined by the contrasting structural fence members. Careful planning and design addressed the maintenance needs early, to reduce upkeep throughout the life of the bridge. The concrete belly and abutments made from natural rock veneer are virtually maintenance-free. The rough surface and anti-graffiti coating deters vandalism. The steel fencing was painted with a special paint and UV clear-coat that is guaranteed to hold up under Tucson s intense sun and weather for a minimum of 10 years. The advances in technology demonstrated on the Diamondback Bridge serve as a successful example of how modern bridge design and construction can blend form and function into a dutiful concrete and steel structure. The City of Tucson used vision and technical skill to create a landmark bridge that serves as a key link to the downtown area. Now, walking in Downtown Tucson is not just a means of getting from one place to another, but a fun and whimsical experience. As a local traffic reporter put it, It is rather impressssssssssssssssive. The implementation of programs to support the low-range planning and svstematic enhancement, maintenance and construction of pedestrian facilities; A City Center should be a vibrant place that reflects the cultural heritage of an area. It should be a place where people can live, work, shop, and enjoy the city. The Diamondback Bridge has been in the planning stages since the acceptance of the Downtown (Tucson) Land Use and Circulation Study in The goal of this study was to create a vibrant downtown area and planning for a comprehensive downtown transportation system was a central component in fulfilling this vision to connect people and places. The Diamondback Bridge is one of seven pedestrian bridges planned and/or existing that provides continuous safe pedestrian access throughout Downtown Tucson. The bridge is a significant part of a larger downtown transportation system that provides for vehicular traffic, bicycles, pedestrians, bus transit, historic trolley and parking. (See map in the back of this report.) Walking is the most basic form of transportation that exists today, and is the starting point in any journey. People walk to their cars, to the bus, to their bicycle, and sometimes all the way to their destinations. The City of Tucson recognizes that it must provide a regional transportation system that takes into consideration all modes of transportation that incorporates safe, accessible pedestrian pathways. Creating a pedestrian environment involves looking at the big picture rather than simply striping a crosswalk, installing a signal, or constructing a pedestrian overpass. The Tucson Downtown Pedestrian Implementation Plan adopted in 1996 states: Downtown Tucson, Arizona is envisioned as a place where residents, conimuters, and visitors enjoy walking through an exciting urban environnient on shaded sidewalks punctuated with public art and cultural markers characteristic ofthe Son oran environment. The Diamondback Bridge is not a stand alone sculpture that will eventually become obsolete. The bridge is a viable link in a regional cityurlde system of pedestrian pathways and sidewalks that extends from the Northwest side of Tucson, through Downtown, and then continues on to the Southeast side of Tucson. The Diamondback Bridge links the downtown business district with neighborhoods, regional parks, schools, Pima Community College, and the University of Arizona. The bridge fills a significant regional transportation need that connects various land uses and creates a safe, continuous pedestrian corridor within the Metropolitan Tucson area. The implementation of proiects and/or proprams to meet the needs of elderlv and/or mobilitv-impaired pedestrians; The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed to ensure that all people, including those with disabilities have equal access to transportation, thus providing everyone with opportunities to engage in employment, school, shopping, recreation, and other everyday activities. The City of Tucson is a prime retirement community as well as a place for senior citizens to vacation in Tucson s warm winter months. Because the City of Tucson values its senior and mobility-impaired citizens, pedestrian facilities are planned, designed, operated, and maintained to meet andor exceed (ADA) standards. The City also realizes that not everyone can drive an automobile and are committed to providing a citywide network of transportation facilities that include all modes of travel. The Diamondback Bridge is a prime example of a safe, accessible, pedestrian facility that is part of an overall transportation system to provide mobility for all. Some of the design features of the bridge to accommodate the needs of the elderly and mobility impaired include: + The ramps into and out of the bridge are at a gentle slope to allow easy access to wheelchairs. The slope at street-level on Broadway is much more severe since Broadway slopes downward to go underneath the railroad crossing. + The site location chosen for the bridge made it possible to eliminate the customay steep switchback ramps, associated with many other + pedestrian overpasses. Pedestrians can take their time and enjoy the experience of being inside the belly of a snake instead of darting across 6 lanes of traffic. Since the bridge is totally separated, pedestrians do not have to worry about looking right or left for turning traffic. The bridge provides a link in an overall accessible pedestrian network away from traffic. Plazas are provided at each end of the bridge for people who want to take a short rest from walking The bridge provides an unobstructed walkway of 14 feet wide, which allows safe passage of pedestrians and bicyclists using the bridge at the same time.,:- These design features not only help the disabled, it benefits all pedestrians. l [. y - - YPq The implementation of educational Droprams that demonstrate increased use and support of pedestrian facilities; [l~[-$~~,~j~~,/+j&&,~~ The City of Tucson s community education and outreach program ties directly to their mission of promoting use of alternate modes within the City. Since the Diamondback Bridge is an important pedestrian link in the downtown area and a cityurlde network, the City teamed with many local organizations to communicate their idea about the pedestrian bridge. Plans for the bridge were developed with considerable public input, including two public meetings, in 1997 and Over the course of a number of months, artist Simon Donovan and City staff made over twenty-five public presentations to create support for the development of the Diamondback Bridge. Computer-animated graphics were created and used to simulate the experience of walking through a pedestrian bridge shaped like a snake. Word spread throughout the community and the computer-animated simulation of the bridge was featured on several local TV news shows. After much hard work and extensive community outreach, the public accepted the idea and engineering plans were drawn up to bring the idea closer to a reality. In addition, Simon Donovan, an instructor at ArtWORKS! Academy, a Tucson alternative high school, taught a program on public art and about the critical importance of enriching the pedestrian experience through art features. He employed a number of students as artist assistants in creating a series of stencils and templates to paint the complex snake pattern design onto the bridge surface as well as the creation of grooved strips for the form liner of the snake s belly. Shortly before the bridge opened, a group of kindergarteners were walking by the bridge and Simon took that opportunity to tell them all about the bridge and how it was built. As the youngsters listened to Simon, some of them wondered if the snake would eat them if they walked through it. Simon s message to the students - in the pedestrian experience, beauty and details matter. The implementation of proprams to reduce pedestrian-related crashes, iniuries and fatalities; The functional design of the Diamondback Bridge provides safety for users by separating pedestrian traffic from the busy intersection (34,500 vehicles per day) of a State Route (Barraza- Aviation Parkway) and a major City arterial going into Downtown Tucson. In addition, the bridge offers pedestrians both recreational and transportation opportunities along a state highway corridor, which would normally preclude pedestrians. The bridge links the downtown business district, several neighborhoods, regional parks, a high school, and the University of Arizona with a cityurlde network of other planned and existing walkways, resulting in uninterrupted pedestrian access that extends from the Northwest side of Tucson through Downtown, and to the Southeast side of Tucson. In order for a pedestrian overpass facility to be safe, it must be used. Studies show that many pedestrians will not use an overpass if they can cross at the street level just as easily. The size of the intersection of Broadway Boulevard and the Barraza-Aviation Parkway is so large and it crosses over so much traffic, that a street-level pedestrian crossing is not feasible. Overpasses also work best when the topography allows for a structure without long steep ramps. The Diamondback Bridge has gentler slopes than the street-level since Broadway slopes downward to go underneath the railroad crossing. The Diamondback Bridge is so fascinating, many people actually go out of their way to use it, often with a camera in hand. The development of partnerships with local or repional Dedestrians who have increased elected and appointed communitv leaders support of pedestrian facilitv, safetv and health issues. Functional public art is a great way to involve public input in the fabric of the city, and it allows artists, engineers and the public to partner together to create a pleasing atmosphere and landmark in the city. The Diamondback Bridge marked the first time the City of Tucson Department of Transportation accepted an artist s concept before engineers actually designed the project. The community s commitment to excellence and spirit of creativity were directly responsible for the success of this project. Just prior to its opening, morning radio shows were discussing how awesome the bridge looked and the overall community sentiment for the opening of the bridge was one of great anticipation. The following individuals and organizations directly contributed to the successful completion of this new Tucson landmark: Simon Donovan, Artist - whose inspiration of a Diamondback rattlesnake spanning across Broadway Boulevard became a brilliant idea for a pedestrian bridge. Simon worked with many citizens groups, engineers, and construction workers to see this dream turn into a reality; Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) - the City-owned bridge was built in ADOT right-of-way and connected to a pedestrian pathway along a State Highway. ADOT worked alongside the City of Tucson as a partner to issue the necessary work permits and environmental clearances; Tucson Pima Arts Council - who facilitated the Call to Artist and Artist Selection process; The Barraza-Aviation Parkway Citizens Advisory Committee - a City Council appointed committee who oversaw the creation, design, and construction of the Diamondback Bridge as part of an overall downtown land use and transportation project; TY Lin International Structural Engineers - for their engineering ingenuity to design a safe, accessible pedestrian facility while incorporating an artist s concept of a rattlesnake; Hunter Contracting Company - for their flexibility in construction techniques and allowing an artist to come along side their construction crews to create an authentic-looking Diamondback rattlesnake built out of concrete and steel; Transcore, General Consultant - served in a project management capacity and a post design role during the construction of the bridge; The local news media for generating enthusiasm and support of the pedestrian bridge and keeping the public informed of progress from the beginning to the completion of the project; And Tucson s citizens for their willingness to take a chance and support the bold concept of a rattlesnake bridge and their patience during the construction of the new bridge. On May 23, 2002, Mayor Robert E. Walkup, the City Council, representatives from the Diamondback and Sidewinder Baseball teams, local residents, school children, business representatives, news media, project team members, and others celebrated the completion of the bridge with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. At the ceremony the bridge received a traditional Native American Tohono O odham blessing to signify its linking of art, culture, and transportation. The Diamondback Bridge is a functional architectural structure that blends witlr tlre soutlr western culture and surroundings of the Sonoran Desert. As a result of everyone pulling together, tlre City of Tucson Itas added a signifccant and useful lairdniark that our citizens may use mid appreciate for years to come. - City of Tucson Project Manager. The Diamondback Bridge has been recognized by many local and national professional organizations for its contribution to the community, innovation in technology, and it s environmental enhancements. Awards received to date include: *:* Excellence Award - Federal Highway Administration Highway-Related Projects (October 2002) *:* Engineering Excellence A ward - Land Surveyors and Civil Engineers of California (October 2002) *:* Project of the Year Award - American Public Works Association (APWA) National Level (April 2003) *:* Project of the Year Award - American Public Works Association (APWA) Arizona Chapter (February 2003) *:* Build Arizona Award - Associated General Contactors, Arizona Chapter (January 2003) *:* Build America Award of Merit - Associated General Contactors, National Chapter (February 2003) *:* Award of Excellence - Portland Cement Association (January 2003) *:* National Honor Award - American C
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