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Literature, Literacy and Language, Penguin Edition, Grade 9, South Carolina Edition PDF

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Prentice Hall Literature, Literacy and Language, Penguin Edition, Grade 9, South Grade 9 C O R R E L A T E D T O READING Understanding and Using Literary Texts Standard E1-1 The student will read and comprehend
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Prentice Hall Literature, Literacy and Language, Penguin Edition, Grade 9, South Grade 9 C O R R E L A T E D T O READING Understanding and Using Literary Texts Standard E1-1 The student will read and comprehend a variety of literary texts in print and nonprint formats. Students in read four major types of literary texts: fiction, literary nonfiction, poetry, and drama. In the category of fiction, they read the following specific types of texts: chapter books, adventure stories, historical fiction, contemporary realistic fiction, young adult novels, science fiction, folktales, myths, satires, parodies, allegories, and monologues. In the category of literary nonfiction, they read classical essays, memoirs, autobiographical and biographical sketches, and speeches. In the category of poetry, they read narrative poems, lyrical poems, humorous poems, free verse, odes, songs/ballads, and epics. E1-1.1 Compare/contrast ideas within and across literary texts to make inferences. E1-1.2 Analyze the impact of point of view on literary texts. E1-1.3 Interpret devices of figurative language (including extended metaphor, oxymoron, pun, and paradox). E1-1.4 Analyze the relationship among character, plot, conflict, and theme in a given literary text. SE/TE: Comparing Literary Works: Themes, 160, 171, Symbolism and Allegory, 382, 401, Biographical Writing, 498, 511, Humorous Writing, 572, 581, Archetypal Themes, 944, 959; Contemporary interpretations, 1126, 1137; Compare and Contrast, assumptions chart, 1193, 1199; Make Inferences, 211, 257; Setting, 290; Biographical Writing, 498; Comparing Satire, 986; Contemporary Interpretations, 1126 SE/TE: Point of view: Venn diagram, 80, fiction/nonfiction, 83, 84, 85, 87, 89, chart for comparing, 93 SE/TE: Figurative language, 608, 610, 614, 615, 617, 625, 627, 629, 633, 637, 639, 687, 693; Lyric Poetry, 748; Blank Verse, 833; Epic Simile, 1087 SE/TE: Comparing Literary Works: Themes, 160, 171, 305, Archetypal Themes, 944, 959; Comparing and Contrasting Characters, 1145, 1150, 1152, 11153, 1155, 1158, 1160, 1163, 1167, 1168, 1171, 1172, 1173, 1176, 1179, 1182, 1186, 1189; Literary Analysis: Plot and Foreshadowing, 43; Character, 125; Conflict, 211; Character and Characterization, 313; Dialogue, 347, 801; Epic Hero, 1041; Protagonist and Antagonist, E1-1.5 Analyze the effect of the author s craft (including tone and the use of imagery, flashback, foreshadowing, symbolism, irony, and allusion) on the meaning of literary texts. E1-1.6 Create responses to literary texts through a variety of methods (for example, written works, oral and auditory presentations, discussions, media productions, and the visual and performing arts). E1-1.7 Compare/contrast literary texts from various genres (for example, poetry, drama, novels, and short stories). E1-1.8 Read independently for extended periods of time for pleasure. SE/TE: Foreshadowing, 43, 51, 57, 64, 69; Irony, 265, 267, 273, 274, 276, 277, 278, 279; Symbolism, 382, 384, 385, 387, 388, 390, 391, 393, 394, 395, 397, 398, 400, 401; Tone, 428, 430, 439, 445, 453, 461; Imagery, 608, 612, 676, 678, 679, 683, 684; Images, chart, 615; Allusion, 861, 891, 1126, 1137; Flashback, 1041, 1048, 1079; Literary Analysis: Author s Voice, 101; Irony, 257; Author s Style, 441; Dramatic Irony, 893 SE/TE: Writing to Compare Literary Works, 93, 171, 305, 401, 511, 581, 685, 755, 959, 1137, 1233; Response to Literature, ; also see: Listening and Speaking: Debate, 281, 1117; Panel discussion, 463, 739, 1207; Staged performance, 934; Mock Trial, 934; Communication Workshop: Oral Interpretation of Literature, 768 SE/TE: Comparing Literary Works: Biographical Writing, 498, 511, Humorous Writing, 572, 581, Forms of Lyric poetry, 748, 755, Archetypal Themes, 944, 959, Satire, 986, 1001, Contemporary Interpretations, 1126, 1137, Tall Tale and Myth, 1216, 1233 SE/TE: Independent Reading, 185, 415, 595, 769, 1019, 1247 READING Understanding and Using Informational Texts Standard E1-2 The student will read and comprehend a variety of informational texts in print and nonprint formats. Students in read informational (expository/persuasive/argumentative) texts of the following types: historical documents, research reports, essays (for example, social, political, scientific, historical, natural history), position papers (for example, persuasive brochures, campaign literature), editorials, letters to the editor, informational trade books, textbooks, news and feature articles, magazine articles, advertisements, journals, speeches, reviews (for example, book, movie, product),contracts, government documents, business forms, instruction manuals, product-support materials, and application forms. They also read directions, schedules, and recipes embedded in informational texts. In addition, they examine commercials, documentaries, and other forms of nonprint informational texts. E1-2.1 Compare/contrast theses within and across informational texts. SE/TE: Contemporary interpretations, comparing allusions, 1126, 1137; Reading Skill: Compare and Contrast, 1193, 1199, 1202, 1205; Reading Skill: Identifying the Main Idea and Supporting Details, 441 2 E1-2.2 Compare/contrast information within and across texts to draw conclusions and make inferences. E1-2.3 Analyze informational texts for author bias (including word choice, the exclusion and inclusion of particular information, and unsupported opinions). E1-2.4 Create responses to informational texts through a variety of methods (for example, drawings, written works, oral and auditory presentations, discussions, and media productions). E1-2.5 Analyze the impact that text elements have on the meaning of a given informational text. E1-2.6 Analyze information from graphic features (for example, charts and graphs) in informational texts. E1-2.7 Analyze propaganda techniques in informational texts. E1-2.8 Read independently for extended periods of time to gain information. SE/TE: Comparing Informational Texts, 79, 159, 289, 381, 497, 571, 675, 943, 985, 1125, 1215; Reading Skill: Identifying Main Idea and Supporting Details, 465 SE/TE: Fact and opinion, distinguish between, 584; also see: Informational Texts: Logic, critique, ; Credibility, evaluate, ; Sources, evaluate, ; Literary Analysis: Persuasive Essay, 519; Persuasive Speech, 539; Compare Media Coverage, 1246 SE/TE: Timed writing & Comparing Informational Texts, 79, 381, 497, 571, 943, 985, 1125; also see: Comparing Biographical Writing, 511; Comparing Contemporary Interpretations, 1126, 1137; SE/TE: Informational Texts: chart signal words, 74 79; format and structure, ; structure, informational texts, ; follow technical directions, ; texts, identify characteristics of types of, SE/TE: Informational Texts (with pictures and symbols): Recipe, How-to Article, 74 78; Train Schedule, Brochure, ; Signs and Instructions, Technical Instructions, ; Technical Document; Atlas Entry, Travel Brochure, ; Web Site, Web Encyclopedia Entry, SE/TE: Propaganda, evaluate, 934; also see: Informational Texts: Logic, critique, ; Credibility, evaluate, ; Sources, evaluate, ; Analyze and Evaluate Persuasive Appeals, 519; Analyze and Evaluate Persuasive Techniques, 539 SE/TE: Independent Reading, 185, 415, 595, 769, 1019, 1247; Historical Research Study, READING Building Vocabulary Standard E1-3 The student will use word analysis and vocabulary strategies to read fluently. Instructional appendixes are provided as the baseline expectations for instruction and are not intended to be all-inclusive documents E1-3.1 Use context clues to determine the meaning of technical terms and other unfamiliar words. SE/TE: Explain context clues, 237, 253; Context clues, 592 3 E1-3.2 Analyze the meaning of words by using Greek and Latin roots and affixes. (See Instructional Appendix: Greek and Latin Roots and Affixes.) E1-3.3 Interpret euphemisms and connotations of words to understand the meaning of a given text. E1-3.4 Spell new words using Greek and Latin roots and affixes. (See Instructional Appendix: Greek and Latin Roots and Affixes.) SE/TE: Word Study (prefixes, suffixes, roots), 33, 39, 57, 69, 111, 121, 135, 149, 237, 253, 267, 279, 329, 343, 359, 371, 453, 461, 475, 487, 527, 535, 549, 561, 629, 639, 651, 665, 703, 715, 729, 737, 831, 891, 911, 931, 975, 1083, 1115, 1163, 1189, 1199, 1205 SE/TE: Connotation, experiment with, 583; Vocabulary Workshop: Connotation and Denotation , R16 SE/TE: Word Study (prefixes, suffixes, roots), 33, 39, 57, 69, 111, 121, 135, 149, 237, 253, 267, 279, 329, 343, 359, 371, 453, 461, 475, 487, 527, 535, 549, 561, 629, 639, 651, 665, 703, 715, 729, 737, 831, 891, 911, 931, 975, 1083, 1115, 1163, 1189, 1199, 1205 WRITING Developing Written Communications Standard E1-4 The student will create written work that has a clear focus, sufficient detail, coherent organization, effective use of voice, and correct use of the conventions of written Standard American English. Instructional appendixes are provided as the baseline expectations for instruction and are not intended to be all inclusive documents By the beginning of high school, students should have mastered the concepts listed below. Review and/or reteaching may be necessary. Conventions of Grammar Parts of Speech nouns (common proper nouns, singular and plural nouns, collective nouns, agreement of nouns and their modifiers) pronouns (personal pronouns, nominative and objective-case pronouns, pronoun-antecedent agreement, indefinite pronouns, pronoun case) verbs (past, present, and future verb tenses; past participles of commonly misused verbs; subject-verb agreement; consistent verb tenses; verb formation) adverbs (adverbs of time, place, manner, and degree; irregular adverbs; formation of comparative and superlative adverbs) adjectives (comparative and superlative adjectives, proper adjectives, irregular comparative and superlative adjectives, formation of comparative and superlative adjectives) conjunctions(and, but, or, because, since, yet, until, although, while, neither, nor) SE/TE: Nouns: common/proper, 40, abstract/concrete, 70, possessive, 97 SE/TE: Pronouns, 122, 150 SE/TE: Verbs, 254, 280, 309, 514 SE/TE: Adverbs, 562, 666, 1009 SE/TE: Adjectives, 536, 666, 760 SE/TE: Conjunctions, 406, prepositions and prepositional phrases interjections Usage SE/TE: Prepositions, 640, 689; Prepositional phrase, 666, 1239 SE/TE: R51 subject-verb agreement SE/TE: Subject-verb agreement, 407 subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement with collective noun SE/TE: Pronoun-antecedent agreement, 177; Subject-verb agreement, 407 main and subordinate clauses SE/TE: Clauses: main, subordinate, 976 idiomatic usage SE/TE: Idiom, 1244 placement of modifiers SE/TE: Adverbs, 217, 322, 342, 562; Adjectives, 536, 760 shifts in construction SE/TE: Parallel constructions, 587 Mechanics of Editing Capitalization first word of sentence; the names of people; the pronoun I; proper nouns; the initials of a person s name; courtesy titles (for example, Mr. and Ms.);days of the week; months of the year; titles of books, poems, songs; geographic names; holidays; historical and special events; titles of works of art; titles of publications; brand names; proper adjectives; names of organizations; names of ethnic and national groups; names of established religions and languages Punctuation end punctuation (periods, exclamation points, question marks) commas (to enclose appositives; to separate items in a series; in dates, addresses, and greetings and closings in letters; in compound sentences; between main clauses; to separate introductory clauses and long introductory phrases from the main body of sentences) SE/TE: Nouns: common/proper, 40, R50; Capitalization, R52 SE/TE: Quotations: punctuating, 761; Punctuation, R53 R54 SE/TE: Commas, 1190, R53 periods in abbreviations SE/TE: Documenting sources, 1008 apostrophes (contractions, possessive nouns) quotation marks (to show dialogue, in direct quotations, to indicate titles of short pieces within longer pieces, underlining or italics of titles of separately published works) colons hyphens semicolons SE/TE: Apostrophes, R54 SE/TE: Quotations, 761, R53 R54 SE/TE: Colons, 1206, R53 SE/TE: Hyphens, R54 SE/TE: Semicolons, 1206, R53 ellipses SE/TE: Ellipsis, 1206 parentheses SE/TE: Parentheses, R54 5 Spelling (high frequency words ; three- and four-letter short-vowel words; words that do not fit regular spelling patterns; basic short-vowel, long-vowel, r-controlled, and consonant-blend patterns; misused homonyms; commonly confused words; words that have blends; contractions; compound words; words with orthographic patterns; words with suffixes and prefixes; multisyllabic words; commonly confused words; double consonant patterns; irregular vowel patterns in multisyllabic words; and words with Greek and Latin roots and affixes) E1-4.1 Organize written works using prewriting techniques, discussions, graphic organizers, models, and outlines. E1-4.2 Use complete sentences in a variety of types (including simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex). E1-4.3 Create multiple-paragraph compositions that have an introduction and a conclusion, include a coherent thesis, and use support (for example, definitions and descriptions). E1-4.4 Use grammatical conventions of written Standard American English, including SE/TE: Spelling, focus on, 179, 311, 589; Spelling skills, use basic, 1143; also see: Word Study, 33, 39, 57, 69, 111, 121, 135, 149, 237, 253, 267, 279, 329, 343, 359, 371, 453, 461, 475, 487, 527, 535, 549, 561, 629, 639, 651, 665, 703, 715, 729, 737, 831, 891, 911, 931, 975, 1083, 1115, 1163, 1189, 1199, 1205 SE/TE: Writing Workshop: Prewriting, 94, 173, 403, 512, 583, 686, 757, 960, 1235; Writing: Comparison Essay, 171 SE/TE: Writer s Toolbox: Sentence Fluency, 515; Revising to Vary Sentence Patterns, 689; Revising to Combine Sentences with Phrases, 963; Revising to Combine Sentences Using Adverb Clauses, 1009; Revising to Correct Fragments and Run-ons, 1141; Varying Sentence Structure and Length, 1239; Grammar: Simple and Compound Sentences, 1084; Complex and Compound-Complex Sentences, 1116; Subject/Predicate, 344; Grammar: Prepositional Phrase, 666; Appositive Phrase, 716; Participle and Participial Phrases, 932 SE/TE: Writing Workshop: Autobiographical Narrative, 94 99; Problem-and-Solution Essay, ; Cause-and-Effect Essay, ; Business Letter, ; Editorial, ; Descriptive Essay, ; Response to Literature, ; How-to Essay, ; Research Report, ; Comparison-and- Contrast Essay, ; News Story, 281; Compare and Contrast Essay, 305, 755, 1137 SE/TE: Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, 40, 70, 97, 122, 150, 177, , 254, 280, 309, 344, 372, 407, 462, 488, 514, 515, 536, 562, 587, 592, 640, 666, 689, 716, 738, 760, 761, 932, 963, 976, 1009, 1084, 1116, 1141, 1190, 1206, 1239, R50 R54 subject-verb agreement, SE/TE: Subject-verb agreement, 407 pronoun-antecedent agreement, SE/TE: Pronoun-antecedent agreement, 177 agreement of nouns and their modifiers, SE/TE: Adjectives, 536, 666, 760 6 verb formation, SE/TE: Verbs, 254, 280, 309, 514 pronoun case, SE/TE: Pronouns, 122, 150 formation of comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and idiomatic usage. (See Instructional Appendix: Composite Writing Matrix.) E1-4.5 Revise writing to improve clarity, tone, voice, content, and the development of ideas. (See Instructional Appendix: Composite Writing Matrix.) E1-4.6 Edit written pieces for correct use of Standard American English, including the reinforcement of the mechanics previously taught. (See Instructional Appendix: Composite Writing Matrix.) SE/TE: Adjectives, 760; For related information see: Adverbs, 562; Adjectives, 536 SE/TE: Idiom, 1244 SE/TE: Writing Workshop: Revising, 96, 176, 308, 406, 586, 688, 760 SE/TE: Writing Workshop: Editing and Proofreading, 179, 311, 691, 1143; also see: Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, 40, 70, 97, 122, 150, 177, 254, 280, 309, 322, 342, 344, 372, 406, 407, 462, 488, 514, 515, 536, 562, 587, 592, 640, 666, 689, 716, 738, 760, 761, 831, 932, 963, 976, 1009, 1016, 1084, 1116, 1141, 1190, 1206, 1239, 1241, 1244, 1252, R50 R54 WRITING Producing Written Communications in a Variety of Forms Standard E1-5 The student will write for a variety of purposes and audiences. E1-5.1 Create informational pieces (for example, letters of request, inquiry, or complaint) that use language appropriate for the specific audience. E1-5.2 Create narratives (for example, personal essays, memoirs, or narrative poems) that use descriptive language to create tone and mood. E1-5.3 Create descriptions for use in other modes of written works (for example, narrative, expository, and persuasive). E1-5.4 Create persuasive pieces (for example, editorials, essays, speeches, or reports) that develop a clearly stated thesis and use support (for example, facts, statistics, and firsthand accounts). SE/TE: Writing Workshop: Business Letter, ; Editorial, ; How-to Essay, ; Meeting Minutes, ; also see; Writing: Letter, 1207; State Job Application, 381; Research and Technology: Informative Brochure, 345 SE/TE: Writing Workshop: Autobiographical Narrative, 94 99; Short Story, ; Descriptive Essay, ; Writing: Anecdote, 41; Journal Entry, 123; Informal Letter, 373; Everyday Epic, 1085; Listening and Speaking: Dialogue, 373; Poem, 739 SE/TE: Writing Workshop: Descriptive Essay, ; also see: Description, details, list, 641; Description of scene, 717; Autobiographical Narrative, 94-99; Short Story, ; Description of a Scene, 641 SE/TE: Writing Workshop: Editorial, ; Writing: Critique, 71; Proposal, 563; Editorial, 667; Communications Workshop: Deliver a Persuasive Speech, 594; Editorial, Persuasive Letter, 933; Debate, 281, 1117; Speech, 289; Persuasive Letter, 933 7 E1-5.5 Create technical pieces (for example, proposals, instructions, and process documentation) that use clear and precise language appropriate for the purpose and audience. SE/TE: Writing Workshop: How-to Essay, ; Meeting Minutes, RESEARCHING Applying the Skills of Inquiry and Oral Communication Standard E1-6 The student will access and use information from a variety of sources. E1-6.1 Clarify and refine a research topic. E1-6.2 Use direct quotations, paraphrasing, or summaries to incorporate into written, oral, auditory, or visual works the information gathered from a variety of research sources. E1-6.3 Use a standardized system of documentation (including a list of sources with full publication information and the use of in-text citations) to properly credit the work of others. E1-6.4 Use vocabulary (including Standard American English) that is appropriate for the particular audience or purpose. E1-6.5 Create written works, oral and auditory presentations, and visual presentations that are designed for a specific audience and purpose. SE/TE: Writing Workshop: Problem and Solution Essay, ; Research Report, ; Research and Technology: Learning Log, 151; Research Report, 977; Listening and Speaking: Oral Report, 1191 SE/TE: Paraphrases, 758; Quotations, direct, indented, punctuating, 761; also see: Use Primary and Secondary Sources, 489; Follow Conventions for Documentation, 537; Document Sources, 935; Cite Sources, 977; Credit Sources to Avoid Plagiarism, 1005; Documenting Sources 1008 SE/TE: Follow Conventions for Documentation, 537; Quotations, direct, indented, punctuating, 761; Document Sources, 935; Cite Sources, 977; Credit Sources to Avoid Plagiarism, 1005; Documenting Sources 1008; Research and Technology: Multimedia Presentation, 935 SE/TE: Word choice, 95, 1140; Vocabulary, evaluate, 176; Language, use active, 308; Words, choose powerful, 586; Vivid words, choose, 687; Revise word choice to vary, 1006 SE/TE: Communication Workshop: Delivering a Persuasive Speech, 594; Oral Interpretation of Literature, 768, Multimedia Presentation of a Research Report, 1018; Writing Workshop: Research Report, ; also see: Research and Technology, 489, 1191; Written Presentation, 345; Listening and Speaking: Persu
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