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Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard

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User Manual of the Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard. Keyboard version 1.4 Manual version 1.5 Prepared by Vincent M. Setterholm, Logos Research Systems, Inc. 2010.
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    Keyboard version 1.4 Manual version 1.5 Prepared by Vincent M. Setterholm, Logos Research Systems, Inc.   Logos Research Systems, Inc., 2007, 2010  Installation The Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard is designed for Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, and Windows 2000 operating systems. Though not tested for Windows NT 4.0, this keyboard may function in that environment as well. The Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard should work with any Unicode compliant Greek font, though certain fonts may be missing certain characters. Windows 7 / Windows Vista: 1. Run the kbdlbgr\setup.exe  file. On Windows Vista, no additional set-up is required, unless you have a previous Greek keyboard installed at the Greek (Greece) locale, in which case you may wish to remove the old keyboard in the Clock, Region and Language Options dialog of the Control Panel. Windows XP: 1. Log in as an Administrator. 2. Run keyboard installer. The keyboard is installed by running the kbdlbgr\setup.exe  file. (You can verify if the keyboard is already installed by going to the Control Panel  | Add or Remove Programs and looking for 'Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard' on your list of installed programs.) 3. Modify language input settings. The newly installed Keyboard must be associated with the Greek input locale. Go to Control Panel  | Regional and Language Options  | click the Languages  tab | and click the Details  box. In the Installed Services pane, check to see if Greek is installed. If Greek is currently installed, look at the keyboard it is mapped to. If Greek is already mapped to Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard, then your association is already installed. All other users click the Add  button | select Greek  from the Input Language drop-down | check the Keyboard layout/IME  box (this may be checked automatically) | choose Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard  from the drop-down list | click OK  | click Apply  | click OK  | click Apply. Windows 2000: 1. Log in as an Administrator. 2. Run keyboard installer. The keyboard is installed by running the kbdlbgr\setup.exe  file. (You can verify if the keyboard is already installed by going to the Control Panel  | Add or Remove Programs and looking for 'Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard' on your list of installed programs.) 3. Install support files for Greek. Go to Control Panel  | Regional and Language Options  and under the General  tab, in the Language Settings for the System  box, check Greek  if  it is not already checked, and click Apply . You may be  prompted to reboot the system. 4. Modify language input settings. The newly installed Keyboard must be associated with the Greek language input locale. Go to Control Panel | Regional Options  | Input Locales  | Click Add  | Select Greek  as an input locale | under Keyboard layout/IME choose Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard  | click OK  | Click Apply  | Click OK . Follow any onscreen instructions. Hot Keys: Windows 7, Vista, XP and 2000 support the LeftAlt+Shift hot key to switch through a list of input locales. You may reassign this hot key, or assign custom hot keys for switching directly to Greek (or any other input locale) in the Region and Language Options of the Control Panel; Consult your operating system documentation for assistance. Uninstallation Because Microsoft is fairly protective of regional and language settings, if you need to install a newer version of this keyboard, you may need to manually uninstall the old version - future installers may not be able to upgrade your current set-up. Uninstallation procedures are as follows: 1. Close all applications that might be using the Greek input locale. 2. In your Regional Options, remove the Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard from the association with the Greek Input Locale. (See step 3 in the installation instructions for your operating system for the location of this dialog.) 3. Go to Control Panel  | Add or Remove Programs  | click on Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard  | and click Remove . Alphabet The main design goal of the Logos Biblical Greek Keyboard is to facilitate easy input of Biblical Greek on a QWERTY keyboard by placing Greek characters on their most logical English phonetic equivalents. Because there is no one-to-one equivalency across the alphabets, there will be some letters that are placed on QWERTY keys based on similarity in glyph shapes and a few placements that are more or less arbitrary. A phonetic relationship between English and Greek has always been preserved where possible – similar shapes are never matched when a better phonetic option is available. For  example, the  xsi  is placed on x , its closest phonetic equivalent, rather than reserving x  for chi , which looks like an x. Chi  is  placed on the letter c , because in English, the letter c can be a hard sound similar to k, making it a logical phonetic placement ( k  being already used by kappa ). However, since there are two ‘e’ class vowels in Greek, the epsilon  and the eta , the eta  is assigned to h , since the capital form of that letter looks much like a capital H. The following table shows how letters with similar sounds have been assigned: Assignment based on: Greek Letter phonetics glyph arbitrary epsilon e eta h tau t theta q kappa k chi c  xsi x omicron o omega w  pi p  phi f  psi y upsilon u sigma s  final sigma v Breathing marks For breathing marks and accents, an attempt was made to find a visually similar key to encode the mark on. The rough and smooth breathing marks are placed on the [ and ] keys, with the direction of the bracket corresponding to the shape of the  breathing mark. Thus the rough breathing mark is encoded with ‘[’ , and the smooth breathing mark is encoded by ‘]’. Accents To make the accent assignments easy to remember, the upwards slanting acute accent has been assigned to the forward slash key, ‘/’. The downward sloping grave accent has been assigned to the backslash key, ‘\’ . The circumflex accent often looks like a tilde in many Greek hands, so it has been assigned to the tilde. However, for ease of entry, the circumflex has also been assigned to the equal sign ‘=’, so that this common accent can  be entered without the use of the shift key.
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