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My Classroom

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  I study in Blue Bells School. It has a fine new building. My classroom is situated on the first floor. It is a big room. The room is spacious. It is forty feet long and thirty feet wide. It has four doors and three windows. It has five ventilators. There is one almirah in my class room. The floor of the room is made of chips. I read in class IX. There are sixty students in my class room. There is a separate table and chair for every student. There is a big table and a chair for the teacher. The tables and chairs are very comfortable. There is a blackboard in my room. There- are six fans in my room. There is a dustbin for the waste papers. The walls are decorated with pictures of national leaders and charts. We keep our classroom neat and clean. Every year, we win the prize for cleanliness. All the teachers praise us for it. I like my classroom very much. Classrooms besides the teachers are the essential for children to start learning. The classroom is where the children are going to spend part of their day and it has to be comfortable and warming so they can feel like if they are at home and stay. Children need to see things that will get their attention and want to use the objects they see in the classroom. As a teacher you need to see that you have the correct equipment, furnishings, and materials you are going to use to support what you are going to teach the children. The classroom environment has to be calm and lovely for children to get along and be comfortable with everyone including the teacher. My classroom environment would be having space, space is great because this way children have their own spot and are not all bunched together, this may make them feel uncomfortable. I would have my classroom well decorated with materials we are going to use during the time school is running. Having decorations of different things will attract the attention of the children and will open their curiosity of what it means and this way is how we can start the learning process. A classroom that feels warm and with love is what helps a child have confidence in staying and try new things that are not at home. When arranging a room it must permit all children accessibility, the ability to enter all parts of the environment including bathrooms and to access equipment and materials and availability too, the ability to participate in all experiences ( Decker, C.A, Decker J. R, Freeman, N.K, Knopf, H.T., 2009). My room first of all will have a map of the whole classroom showing what is where and to show the children and parents where the exit is in case of an emergency and where to go. My classroom for preschoolers... It was first day of my new class 3 session. I was very happy as well as anxious about my new Classroom many questions were arising in my mind. For example- Where will be my new classroom, Who will be my new classmate and who will be my new Class teacher etc . On first day my parents came with me for helping for my new Classroom . I noticed many students were searching their respective new classes. There was very much rush on the school passage. I was also doing the same for class 3. It was very confusing to find my new class because each room was having two or three room number labels. Finally one teacher helped me in this regard after that I found my class easily. I became happy to see the interior and the location of the new class. The class was airy and was at ground floor. The black board was big and nice. My eye was waiting for previous year friends.  After a while I saw two of my friends were entering into this room. I felt relaxed and happy after meeting with them. I talked with them and we all were very happy. t all started with a classroom. I cannot recall the date but I know it was the year 1998. Kids were everywhere, all young like me and as I watched my parents leave the room I asked myself, ―Where am I?‖ A lady who had short white hair with glasses on stood in front of the ro om with an outfit that I believe was a suit. Her name was Ms. K aye. She told us, ―Welcome to Kindergarten!‖ At the time, I did not know much about Kindergarten, matter of fact; I do not think I could even spell it. All I knew was that I was in school. Everytime I heard the word school I just wanted to know was this school place fun. I really did not know the difference between a good and bad education. I just knew I wanted to have fun every day. A couple of adults told me that I would be able to experience naptime when I get to school because that is what all Kindergarteners do. I did not have any friends going to the same school as me but I never worried about that because every Kindergartener was new so we all had to meet each other. My mother and father put in a great amount of effort to find me a school that could beneficial to my growth as a person. When I began Kindergarten I was 5 years old with no thoughts about doing work. All I cared about was the next playtime and when I could take my nap. Things began to change once I was in Kindergarten. For 6 hours a day I learned some of my life basics such as my ABCs, numbers, shapes and even reading. The school I  attended was a school of high standards where each student studied a grade level above their current grade. Therefore, as a Kindergartener I was actually doing work that would be given out in a typical 1 st  grade class. The environment that the school was in was really nice. The doors were big and brown. The building itself was made of tan brick. Each window was made of glass and some were even open sin ce the school was not air conditioned. Ms. Kaye‘s room was on the first floor. Right when you walk in the door you would go down some stairs then there was my Kindergarten classroom. Her room was very kid-friendly. Each Kindergartener sat on a square that was a different color. A person‘s square could be yellow, red, blue or green. My square was red which was cool because it was  my favorite color. If a person did not sit on their square they would get in trouble where their parents would be called. My Kindergarten classroom had another room in it. That room was known as the coat room. Since my school went from Kindergarten to 8 th  grade, they tried to make it so we did not have to worry about getting lost in the chaos of the older kids getting stuff from their lockers. I liked the coatroom because everything was so organized. You also could be sure that no one would steal any of your stuff because everything was labeled and our lunch assistants would watch everything we brought. Everyday, my father would pick me up. Ms. Kaye would sometimes talk to the parents or just sit and wait with us as everybody left. As usual, my dad would come in the classroom, speak to my teacher then leave with me holding his hand. However, one day, Kindergarten changed my life forever. This day, I got picked up then I was going to give Ms. Kaye a hug I noticed that she was following me over to my dad. As I listened I heard her say, ―Suelynn is such a sweet girl and a great student.‖ That was the moment I knew I was destined to  be the best. Ms. Kaye saw a lot of potential in me. She was one of the first teachers to speak highly of me and work with me to improve the person I was. Being a kid meant I did not have many big decisions to make but I did have to worry about doing my best in school to make my parents proud. Ms. Kaye was a woman who had a pretty good family life. She had two kids, her sons. Her husband worked for the City of Detroit where he handled giving out licenses to business owners. She was cognizant that I came from a very good family so she felt that by telling my dad those wonderful words of praise that it would mean something. I could have gotten praise from my teacher every day that I went home but none of those words meant as much as the ones that she told my dad that day. To be honest, I look back at that day and laugh because I really did not understand much of what she was saying since everything we did seemed easy to me. I knew it was something good since I got ice cream right when I left school. After all, I would never just get ice cream right after school. My parents took so much pride in what my teacher said. My mother bought me some new toys. Actually she bought me two Barbies which were my absolute favorite. My dad was the real reason I fell in love with ice cream because he was the main person letting me get free ice cream because he was just that proud. You would have thought that I was called the world‘s next Kindergarten genius because my parents called my whole family to tell them what was said. I still was a five year old kid who did not understand what was going on but enjoyed being in the limelight and getting all the free ice cream I could eat. My grandparents were even more proud of me. It made them happy to know that my parents were doing a great job raising me along with the fact that I was upholding our family‘s history of greatness.  It stunned me that so many people were excited over a few words. I just felt like I was being a little girl who did the same thing every school day. I recited my ABCs, learned how to count and read a few children‘s‘ books. All of this was fun but who knew one day of me doing my same routine would cause me to be praised. As I began to grow I do understand why getting recognized for being the person and student I am is so important. It  was more than a hug and kiss from my mommy and the amount of free Superman ice cream I got. I look at it as someone seeing me for who I really am and acknowledging it. Though I was young back then, I did know that what my teacher said explains the reason I am getting constant praise and pressure to do my best. On the day that this happened I got some hugs and kisses along with a free ice cream. That was a time I could not fully understand the reward from Ms. Kaye‘s s tatement. Until now when I look back at that day I realize that Kindergarten changed my life. It was the beginning of me developing into the person I am now. Kids were everywhere, all young like me and as I watched my parents leave the room I asked myself, ―Where am I?‖ A lady who had short white hair with glasses on stood in front of the room with an outfit that I believe was a suit. Her name was Ms. Kaye. She told us, ―Welcome to Kindergarten!‖ At the time, I did not know much about Kindergarten, matter of fact; I do not think I could even spell it. All I knew was that I was in school. Everytime I heard the word school I just wanted to know was this school place fun. I really did not know the difference between a good My mother and father put in a great amount of effort to find me a school that could beneficial to my growth as a person. When I began Kindergarten I was 5 years old with no thoughts about doing work. All I cared about was the next playtime and when I could take my nap. Things began to change once I was in Kindergarten. For 6 hours a day I learned some of my life basics such as my ABCs, numbers, shapes and even reading. The school I attended was a school of high standards where each student studied a grade level above their current grade. Therefore, as a Kindergartener I was actually doing work that would be given out in a typical 1 st grade class.and bad education. I just knew I wanted to have fun every day. A couple of adults told me that I would be able to experience naptime when I get to school because that is what all Kindergarteners do. I did not have any friends going to the same school as me but I never worried about that because every Kindergartener was new so we all had to meet each other. The environment that the school was in was really nice. The doors were big and brown. The building itself was made of tan brick. Each window was made of glass and some were even open since the school was not air conditioned. Ms. Kaye‘s room was on the first floor. Right  when you walk in the door you would go down some stairs then there was my Kindergarten classroom. Her room was very kid-friendly. Each Kindergartener sat on a square that was a different color. A person‘s square could be yellow, red, blue or green. My squ are was red which was cool because it was my favorite color. If a person did not sit on their square they would get in trouble where their parents would be called. Everyday, my father would pick me up. Ms. Kaye would sometimes talk to the parents or just sit and wait with us as everybody left. As usual, my dad would come in the classroom, speak to my teacher then leave with me holding his hand. However, one day, Kindergarten changed my life forever. This day, I got picked up then I was going to give Ms. Kaye a hug I noticed that she was following me over to my dad. As I listened I heard her say, ―Suelynn is such a sweet girl and a great student.‖ That was the moment I knew I was destined to be the best.  Ms. Kaye saw a lot of potential in me. She was one of the first teachers to speak highly of me and work with me to improve the person I was. Being a kid meant I did not have many big decisions to make but I did have to worry about doing my best in school to make my parents proud. Ms. Kaye was a woman who had a pretty good family life. She had two kids, her sons. Her husband worked for the City of Detroit where he handled giving out licenses to business owners. She was cognizant that I came from a very good family so she felt that by telling my dad those wonderful words of praise that it would mean something. I could have gotten praise from my teacher every day that I went home but none of those words meant as much as the ones that she told my dad that day. To be honest, I look back at that day and laugh because I really did not understand much of what she was saying since everything we did seemed easy to me. I knew it was something good since I got ice cream right when I left school. After all, I would never just get ice cream right after school.   Though I was young back then, I did know that what my teacher said explains the reason I am getting constant praise and pressure to do my best. On the day that this happened I got some hugs and kisses along with a free ice cream. That was a time I could not fully understand the reward from Ms. Kaye‘s statement. Until now when I look back at that day I realize that Kindergarten changed my life. It was the beginnin g of me developing into the person I am now. Why do they come? Thirty-seven smiling young faces in a classroom look up at me, oozing confidence that I will teach them successfully and help them pass the course. I confide in them: the course should really have 24 students for an optimum presentation. Nobody moves. And the smiles stay fixed. I tell them that everything I teach is available online, and the jokes there are probably funnier than the ones I use. They sit still. As they do in the classes of almost two million other faculty members. They will continue to come, the 14 or 15 million students who can‘t or won‘t learn by themselves. Yes, there are two million or so students who can master difficult material on their own, and there are mature individuals whose life circumstances makes it necessary to learn essentials, to pass a course, and to move on. But for the vast majority of America‘s young people, the classroom and the faculty member -- yellowing notes and all -- seem to work best.  And so they come….  Now picture a full colored photo on glossy paper of college students, gathered happily at graduation. Idyllic, but misleading. Look closely, very closely at the picture and find that the picture isn‘t a picture at all, but an assemblage of thousands of individual dots. Separate,  and often strikingly different from each other. Now take away the color and a further grim graininess appears. That‘s the real -world picture a faculty member sees in the classes s/he teaches. A group of individuals, each with different life experience, family circumstance, personal growth pattern, goals, and course selections. Pretty pictures are for people who look at higher education from the far periphery; it is they who dare make general statements, universal predictions and global pronouncements about what will take place in college. I know better. I know that every one of the 2200 or so minutes I will be with this particular group of individuals will present its own challenges, its own opportunities for teaching and learning, and its own possibilities for failure. I am alert to the pressures and influences that divert so many young people, and am no longer surprised at the number of hours many of them spend online. Nor do I express disappointment at the number of students who expect to be taught, who expect to know  –  but who will not do the work involved in learning. They are, after all, the children who learned the alphabet painlessly on Sesame Street, and grew up one click away from the world‘s store of knowledge.   For the vast majority of America‘s young people, the classroom and the faculty member -- yellowing notes and all -- seem to work best. My students need hand-holding, human-hand-holding, to become engaged, and focus on the depth of material rather than on obtaining a quick, superficial answer. They live in a digital world, but remain analog beings and must learn to acquire and assimilate great bodies of knowledge, comprehensive, continuous, and coherent. Fortunately, they don‘t face this task alone. Together with their 30 -odd peers, they begin to form a class. Even though this class will not reach the level of a community of scholars, the collective plays its role. Students begin to share notes, discuss homework, assist each other in understanding difficult material, and interact during class. There is argument, shared humor and collective disappointment; a sudden scurry when an exam is announced, a flurry of conversation just before the exam takes place, and consultation right after it ends. Every one of these interactions enhances student engagement. There is something about the structure of the classroom that contributes to the learning process, perhaps akin to a group of musicians whose joint effort is so much more effective than it would be were they to play their instrument at a separate location with an expert mixing the sounds. People do interact and college students better than most. Fortunately, too, there is the faculty member who knows that teaching is more than presenting information and that learning is a very complex process, difficult and unusual for most people. A whole range of strategies is needed to keep students striving and stretching for a whole period, let alone a whole term. Students must be induced, sometimes with humor, to concentrate. There must be challenge, repetition, surprise and praise.  A successful teacher can offer spontaneity, immediacy, and instant, interactive feedback. He/she knows that a question is not just a request for information. A question can signal to the teacher that something is wrong with the presentation. Often, it can enable a teacher to involve all the others in the class, becoming part of a different, sometimes unanticipated learning experience. Teachers learn to walk the aisles, to watch faces, to orchestrate discussion and stimulate questions. Eye contact and a smile  –  or lack of it  –  can guide the next part of the discussion, and one student‘s difficulties can be used to address those who can‘t even formulate their lack of understand ing. Some teachers know how to seize on a recent event and weave it into the discussion, or look at a student‘s notebook to determ ine whether the student was following properly or not. Depending on the course and the class, a faculty member will help students overcome anxiety, shyness and diffidence. College teachers will use connection and analogies to get a point across. And alert students will follow as a scholar approaches a new problem or situation to understand how an expert thinks. Listening, correcting, suggesting, modeling, prodding, affirming, critiquing, reflecting, admitting, weighing, arguing, and guiding are but some of the other strategies faculty will use to move students along on a trajectory of learning. For many there is nothing as effective as face-to-face teaching, and the five-minute explanation at the chalkboard after class has rescued many a student. There is so much more. Experienced instructors know how to address the blank stare, and are able to evoke expression from students who seat themselves at the back of the room. Reinforcement, encouragement, constructive argumentation all help develop patterns of thinking and behavior which will long outlast the specific topic being taught.  A traditional college education usually comprises 40 or so separate courses offered by as many different faculty members, each of whom will bring to bear those qualities and strategies appropriate to the subject, reflecting his/her character and talents. Students will be brought into discussions where they will venture opinions  –  and defend them without anger. Most will learn to evaluate disagreeable perspectives and remain friends with both proponents and opponents. They will learn how to change their minds, to deal with mistakes, and to respect the rights of others. Faculty members know how to jostle students into active learning. As often as not they are enthusiastic advocates as well as practitioners of the subject at hand, and students will experience the passion as well as the process of a presentation.
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