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NUEN 650 Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control

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NUEN 650 Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Fall 2009 Course Syllabus COURSE DESCRIPTION This course will study the political and technological issues associated with nuclear nonproliferation and
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NUEN 650 Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Fall 2009 Course Syllabus COURSE DESCRIPTION This course will study the political and technological issues associated with nuclear nonproliferation and arms control. Topics studied will include the history of arms control, descriptions and effects of weapons of mass destruction, introduction to the technology of nuclear weapons, details of various arms control treaties and efforts, proliferation pathways in the nuclear fuel cycle, international and domestic safeguards, proliferation resistance in the nuclear fuel cycle, nonproliferation strategies, treaty verification regimes, nuclear terrorism, verifying the elimination of weapons programs, safeguards measurement techniques for material accountancy programs, containment and surveillance, and physical protection mechanisms. Lecture material will be supplemented by homework assignments that will require analytical and computer-based calculations to reinforce material understanding. PREREQUISITES Students entering this course should be enrolled in NUEN 601 Nuclear Reactor Theory or have previously completed NUEN 601 or equivalent. This prerequisite will provide basic nuclear engineering and reactor physics background. CLASS TIME AND LOCATION This course will meet three days per week. The course consists of three hours of in-class lecture according to the following schedule: Time: MWF 11:30 A.M. - 12:20 P.M. Place: HRBB 104 INSTRUCTOR William S. Charlton, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Nuclear Engineering Department Director, Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute Office Address: Teague Research Center Room 322 Phone: (979) Fax: (979) Office Hours: W 9:00-11:00 1 COURSE OBJECTIVES The primary goal of this course is to educate the student in the political, historical, and technical issues associated with battling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. The student will gain expertise in the following topic areas: 1. History of nuclear weapons development 2. Technologies used by the proliferator 3. Known and suspected weapons programs around the world 4. Arms control treaties and treaty verification 5. Technologies and techniques for securing nuclear materials 6. Technologies for monitoring for proliferation activities and verifying the elimination of weapons programs 7. Proliferation within the commercial nuclear fuel cycle 8. Nuclear terrorism After completing this course, the student will be able to: 1. Describe the history of nuclear weapons including a description of the weapons programs of the U.S., U.K., U.S.S.R., China, France, India, Pakistan, South Africa, Iran, Iraq, North Korea, Libya, and Israel. 2. List and describe the skills, capabilities, and materials needed by a proliferator to produce a nuclear weapon. 3. Calculate HEU and Pu production quantities for various nuclear facilities. 4. Identify proliferation risks in a nuclear fuel cycle or in a collection of facilities within a country. 5. Determine methods for safeguarding nuclear material at declared facilities and describe the technology used to measure bulk nuclear materials. 6. Describe methods for identifying covert nuclear activities and how they can be applied to treaty verification. 7. Understand the need for future developments in nonproliferation policy and technology. 8. Assess the interaction between technology and policy in the nonproliferation arena. METHOD OF EVALUATION Students will be graded on homework and simulation exercises. Homework will be assigned throughout the semester (normally you will be assigned one homework set every other week). Two simulation exercises will be held throughout the semester. Prior to each exercise the students will submit pre-simulation materials in small groups. The student will be graded on both the pre-simulation materials and the performance in the exercise. The student s final grade will be determined according to the following percentages: 50% - Homework 30% - Pre-Simulation Exercise Material 20% - Simulation Exercise Participation The grades will be determined on the following scale: A B C D F Late homework will be deducted 10% per day after the due date. A schedule of all assignment due dates is shown at the end of this syllabus. TEXTBOOKS The principle source of information for this course is a set of electronic notes which will be provided to the student in MS PowerPoint form. The following texts are required as a supplement for these notes: 1. Robert F. Mozley, The Politics and Technology of Nuclear Proliferation, The University of Washington Press, Seattle, Washington (1998). 2. James E. Doyle, Ed., Nuclear Safeguards, Security and Nonproliferation, Butterworth- Heinemann Publisher, Amsterdam (2008). The following texts are not required; however, the student may find them to be valuable resources for additional information: 1. Robert Serber, The Los Alamos Primer: The First Lectures on How to Build an Atomic Bomb, University of California Press (1992). * 2. Richard Kokoski, Technology and the Proliferation of, Oxford University Press, New York (1995). 3. Randall Forsberg, Nonproliferation Primer: Preventing the Spread of Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Weapons, MIT Press, Cambridge (1995). 4. Paul L. Leventhal, Sharon Tanzer, and Steven Dolley, Nuclear Power and the Spread of, Brassey's, Inc., Washington, D.C. (2002). Various additional resources will be provided in electronic format to the student and will be used for the class readings. ONLINE COURSE MATERIAL All of the material for this course will be maintained on the University s WebCT Vista system. This includes an electronic copy of this syllabus, the course schedule, all lecture notes, supplemental readings, and homework assignments. The instructor will use the WebCT Vista system and discussion board to communicate important messages to the students. Students should check their often to keep updated on current messages. Also, the student s grades will be posted on the WebCT Vista system, and the students can use this system to check their grades at any time. The WebCT system can be accessed through elearning.tamu.edu. If you are unfamiliar with this system, instruction will be provided. Students will also make occasional use of electronic resources available on the Nuclear Safeguards Educational Portal * An electronic copy of The Los Alamos Primer (a Los Alamos Unclassified Report) will be provided to the student; however, the hardcover text referred to here includes a series of annotations and notes by Richard Rhodes which provide excellent insight into the book s material. These notes are not available in the electronic version provided by the instructor. 3 (http://nsspi.tamu.edu\nsep) maintained by the Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute at TAMU. The instructor will direct you to this resource when necessary. ADA STATEMENT The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Department of Student Life, Services for Students with Disabilities in Room B118 of Cain Hall. The phone number is COPYRIGHTS The handouts used in this course are copyrighted. By handouts we mean all materials generated for this class, which include but are not limited to syllabi, lab problems, in-class materials, review sheets, and additional problem sets. Because these materials are copyrighted, you do not have the right to copy the handouts, unless the author expressly grants permission. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY All students at Texas A&M University are bound by the Aggie Honor Code: An Aggie does not lie, cheat or steal, or tolerate those who do. For more information, the student is referred to the Honor Council Rules and Procedures on the web at As commonly defined, plagiarism consists of passing off as one's own the ideas, work, writings, etc., that belong to another. In accordance with this definition, you are committing plagiarism if you copy the work of another person and turn it in as your own, even if you have the permission of that person. Plagiarism is one of the worst academic sins, for the plagiarist destroys the trust among colleagues without which research cannot be safely communicated. If you have questions regarding plagiarism, please consult the latest issue of the Texas A&M University Student Rules [http://student-rules.tamu.edu/], under the section Scholastic Dishonesty. 4 NUEN 650 Fall 2009 Course Schedule Module Session Date Subject Overview 1 31-Aug Introduction to Nonproliferation and Development and the Technology of Proliferation Known and Suspected Nuclear Weapons Programs Technologies and Processes for the Protection, Control, and Accounting of Nuclear Materials Detecting Undeclared Nuclear Activities and Verifying the Elimination of Programs Preventing Nuclear Terrorism and Illicit Nuclear Trade 2 2-Sep Scientific Revolution Prior to WWII 3 4-Sep MCNP Criticality Simulations 4 7-Sep Development of Uranium Enrichment 5 9-Sep Foundations of the Manhattan Project and Fuel Irradiation 6 11-Sep Material Production Calculations with ORIGEN 7 14-Sep Early Stages of the Manhattan Project and Reprocessing 8 16-Sep The Manhattan Project 9 18-Sep To the End of WWII Sep The Cold War Sep The Breakup of the Soviet Union Sep India Sep Pakistan and the A.Q. Khan Network Sep Argentina and Brazil 15 2-Oct South Africa 16 5-Oct Israel 17 7-Oct North Korea 18 9-Oct Iran and Syria Oct Iraq and Libya Oct Proliferation Determinants and Motivations Oct Nuclear Safeguards and the Security of Nuclear Material Oct Nuclear Materials Measurements Oct Physical Protection Oct Containment and Surveillance Technologies Oct Process Holdup Oct Proliferation Resistance for Commercial Fuel Cycles Oct Simulation: Negotiations with Iran 28 2-Nov Open Source Analysis 29 4-Nov Commercial Satellite Imagery 30 6-Nov Testing Treaties and Test Detection 31 9-Nov Facility Emissions and Environmental Sampling Nov Evaluating Latency and a State s Intents Nov Verifying the Elimination of Programs Nov Analysis of DPRK Program Rollback Nov Illicit Trafficking of Nuclear Materials Nov Nuclear Terrorism and Improvised Nuclear Devices Nov Radiological Devices Nov Field Detection of Nuclear Materials Nov Thanksgiving Holiday Nov Nuclear Forensics and Post-Nuclear Event Attribution 41 2-Dec Export Controls 42 4-Dec Simulation: Terrorist Attack Research Reactor to Acquire HEU Conclusions 43 7-Dec Nuclear Security Challenges for the Future 5 NUEN 650 Fall 2009 Assignment Schedule Module Session Date Assignment Due Overview 1 31-Aug 2 2-Sep Development and 3 4-Sep the Technology of 4 7-Sep Proliferation 5 9-Sep 6 11-Sep Homework #1 Due 7 14-Sep 8 16-Sep 9 18-Sep Homework #2 Due Sep Sep Known and Suspected Nuclear Weapons Programs Technologies and Processes for the Protection, Control, and Accounting of Nuclear Materials Detecting Undeclared Nuclear Activities and Verifying the Elimination of Programs Preventing Nuclear Terrorism and Illicit Nuclear Trade Conclusions 43 7-Dec Sep Sep Sep 15 2-Oct Homework #3 Due 16 5-Oct 17 7-Oct 18 9-Oct Homework #4 Due Oct Oct Complete Pre-simulation Material # Oct Oct Oct Oct Homework #5 Due Oct Oct Oct Complete Simulation Exercise # Nov 29 4-Nov 30 6-Nov Homework #6 Due 31 9-Nov Nov Nov Homework #7 Due Nov Nov Nov Complete Pre-Simulation Material # Nov Nov Nov Nov Homework #8 Due 41 2-Dec 42 4-Dec Complete Simulation Exercise #2 6 NUEN 650 Fall 2009 Reading Schedule Module Session Date Reading Assignment Overview 1 31-Aug Doyle, Chapter 1 and Mozley, Chapter Sep Mozley, Chapter 2 Development and 3 4-Sep Mozley, Chapter 4 the Technology of 4 7-Sep Proliferation 5 9-Sep Mozley, Chapter Sep 7 14-Sep Mozley, Chapter Sep 9 18-Sep Sep Mozley, Chapter Sep Known and Suspected Nuclear Weapons Programs Technologies and Processes for the Protection, Control, and Accounting of Nuclear Materials Detecting Undeclared Nuclear Activities and Verifying the Elimination of Programs Preventing Nuclear Terrorism and Illicit Nuclear Trade Conclusions 43 7-Dec Sep Mozley, Chapter Sep Doyle, Chapter Sep Doyle, Chapter Oct Doyle, Chapter Oct 17 7-Oct 18 9-Oct Oct Doyle, Chapter Oct Oct Doyle, Chapter Oct Doyle, Chapter Oct Doyle, Chapter Oct Doyle, Chapters 5 and Oct Doyle, Chapters Oct Doyle, Chapter 10 and Mozley, Chapter Oct 28 2-Nov Doyle, Chapter Nov Doyle, Chapter Nov Doyle, Chapter Nov Nov Doyle, Chapter Nov Doyle, Chapters 15 and Nov Doyle, Chapter Nov Doyle, Chapters 21 and 22 and Mozley, Chapter Nov Doyle, Chapter Nov Doyle, Chapters 24 and Nov Doyle, Chapter Nov Nov Doyle, Chapter Dec Doyle, Chapters 28 and Dec 7
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