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One Engine. Inoperative (OEI) Surface. Federal Aviation Administration

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One Engine Inoperative (OEI) Surface Presented at: Conference 2012 By: John R. Dermody, P.E. Manager, Airport Engineering Division FAA Office of Airport Safety & Standards Washington, DC Date: One Engine
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One Engine Inoperative (OEI) Surface Presented at: Conference 2012 By: John R. Dermody, P.E. Manager, Airport Engineering Division FAA Office of Airport Safety & Standards Washington, DC Date: One Engine Inoperative (OEI) Description Air Carriers are required to clear obstacles in one-engine out departure situation Each carrier maintains their own chart of critical obstacle height & locations Each carrier computes a 35 ft. obstacle clearance based on specific aircraft load and performance given reduced climb gradient FAA historically only protected for instrument approach procedures There are known impacts to departure payload due to obstacles in departure area 2 Past OEI Pilot Project - Overview - AOSC Initiative - Major Activities and Schedule Present - OEI Pilot Project Meetings - Key Issues Future - Recommendations - Next Steps 3 An Airport Obstruction Standards Committee (AOSC) Initiative AOSC formed in 2003 by FAA Administrator charter Addresses cross lines-of-business (LOB) issues on: FAA policy Airports and airspace Steering Group and Working Group answerable to Administrator from: - Airports (ARP) - Aviation Safety (AVS) - Air Traffic (ATO) - Regions & Centers (ARC) 4 Challenges Define off the end of each commercial runway that requires an OEI procedure for: Straight obstacle Identification area Turning obstacle Identification area Surface gradient for each area Extent of flexibility and enforcement of defined areas 5 OEI Pilot Project - Airports FAA Administrator/OEI focus - Look at an airport community-centered solution - Consolidate FAA policies within the LOBs - No modifications to applicable rules Pilot project airports OEI issues: - OEI flight routes over residential areas (BOS, MIA, PHX) - Complicated zoning issues (BOS, PHX, LAS) - Complicated air traffic operations (DCA, PHX, LAS) - Complex terrain surrounding airport (PHX, LAS) - Complex and dense Special Use Airspace (DCA, LAS) 6 Recommendations of the OEI Pilot Project Single OEI area will not suit all Airports/Users Straight and turning 50:1 versus 62.5:1 Harmonization with ICAO standards, to extent possible Extent of flexibility and enforcement for the defined areas Something with TEETH Grandfathering requirements versus new development 7 Discussion/Recommendation - OEI OIS Area Departure runway ends supporting air carrier operations. Objects should be identified that penetrate OEI OIS starting at DER. Left turn? Straight Right turn? 8 OEI Program Vision AC 150/ s Survey Team Airport Sponsors Airport Layout Plan (ALP) & Other Products Protect Airport areas from future development Airports GIS Database Air Carriers Develop OEI Procedures 9 Recommended Flexibility & Enforcement FAA is attempting to establish the right amount of flexibility in guidance for Areas and Slopes: Strict Implementation: Single surface No penetrations No grandfathering Immediate removal of all obstacles that penetrate that surface Easy to enforce, impossible to implement Flexible Implementation: Multiple self-defined surfaces Penetrations not a factor Excessive grandfathering No removal of penetrations Develop Area and Slope as desired Impossible to enforce, easy to implement 10 Next Steps The FAA plans to issue notice in the Federal Register of proposed policy statement on OEI and may potentially include; Intention of the FAA to implement the pilot program recommendations Impact to the airport may be measured in reduction of passengers, fuel, cargo Proposed implementation timeline once the policy is finalized: FAA to develop detailed policy and guidance (approx. 12 months) Work with the 5 pilot airports to develop OEI tracks (approx. 24 months) Work with additional airports to develop OEI tracks (approx. 36 months) Dependent on funding available 11 Thank you! Comments and Questions John R. Dermody, P.E. Manager, Airport Engineering Division (AAS-100) FAA Office of Airport Safety & Standards Washington, DC Robert Bonanni National Resource Expert for Airport Airspace Issues FAA Office of Airport Safety & Standards Washington, DC
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