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English Language Learners Specialist (BC) 941 Module 2 Sociopolitics Daina Duncan I read ‘The Talking Stick: An American Indian Tradition in the ESL Classroom’ by Kimberly Fujioka as well as the ‘Culture and the ‘good teacher’ in the English Language classroom by Colin Sowden. I also watched both videos the first one, The Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning and the second one by Sonia Nieto, Levels of Multicultural Education. The questions that stood out for me were really in the The T
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  English Language Learners Specialist (BC) 941 Module 2 Sociopolitics Daina Duncan I read ‘The Talking Stick: An American Indian Tradition in the ESL Classroom’ by Kimberly Fujioka as well as the ‘Culture and the ‘good teacher’ in the English Language classroom by Colin Sowden. I also watched both videos the first one, The Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning and the second one by Sonia Nieto, Levels of Multicultural Education. The questions that stood out for me were really in the The Talking Stick: An American Indian Tradition in the ESL Classroom. Some things that the author brought up were actually in reference to Freire (Freire, 1989) where he advises “teachers to learn how to teach by observing student’s learning styles” (Fujioka, pg.2). When I read this it triggered something inside me that I think about a lot in my teaching. It is in regards to teaching students how they   feel they best learn something.  As a teacher I will always try to deliver a lesson in as many different ways as possible. Having said that my first question being why are we as teachers having to teach to everyone’s learning styles? I believe that it is more beneficial to teach students how to regulate themselves and figure out which way they learn best! I think this would be much more beneficial to them. I believe it would be more beneficial to have a conversation with the class in regards to how the lesson was taught and if they liked this style versus other styles of teaching. I know for myself I didn’t understand what type of learner I was until my high school years. If students can figure this out in elementary years that would be so much more beneficial for them! The second question that popped out for me was again in ‘The Talking stick’ article. The issue was on the first page when the author talks about “Traditional teaching practice places the professor in the front of the classroom and the students assembled in rows of desks, all facing the chalkboard. The unchallenged assumption underlying this set-up, is that the teacher has knowledge that the students want to get. The students memorize information, provided by the teacher through lectures, and at a later time, reproduce it in some kind of examination” (Fujioka, pg 1). What I questioned when I was reading this was ‘This doesn’t seem to be just happening in traditional teaching practice. When I watched the video’s the teachers would say something and  English Language Learners Specialist (BC) 941 Module 2 Sociopolitics Daina Duncan then the students would respond with things like “when I say **** you say **** that to me is traditional teaching practice and the students were sitting in table groups when they were repeating what the teacher had told them too. This clip was supposed to be representing a culturally responsive classroom. My question is what is wrong with traditional teaching style in terms of the classroom layout? I’ve seen the stand and deliver model yes and I agree that model often doesn’t work but when you have a class that is completely out of control which model do they always revert back to.….. Kids in rows of desks and the teacher at the front of the class. It happened at my school this past year. This class was so out of control it was unbelievable and the principal was all for having kids learn in pods from hands on learning but this group of students clearly wasn’t ready for this type of learning. I love this new style of learning but I don’t feel it works best for all learners. Lastly again in the ‘Talking Stick’ article the author talks about ‘doing things with language as opposed to learning about language’ the talking stick activity is a great example of this. My last question is ‘What are some other ways we can do things with language? It would be nice to have a list of activities regarding things we could do with our students to teach them language. A resource sheet that we as ELL teachers could refer to when we needed it. References Fujioka, K., 1998 The Talking Stick. The Internet TESL Journal, vol. IV, No. 9, http://iteslj.org/

LEGRES.docx

Aug 4, 2018
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