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Studies in Self-Access Learning Journal, Issue-5-3

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This is the 18th issue of SiSAL Journal and includes contributions from Australia, the USA, Iran, Turkey, the UK, Japan, and Ecuador. The first article by Nga Thanh Nguyen, Donna Tangen and Denise Beutel is a study that explores how the concept of learner autonomy is understood and used in Vietnamese higher educational settings. In the second article, Jordan Dreyer describes a study designed to investigate the effectiveness of using an online vocabulary study tool, Quizlet, in an urban high school language arts class in the USA. The third article, by Afshin Mohammadi, reports on research which investigates learners’ views and practices with regards to two facilities at an Iranian university The article by Tarik Uzun describes a study designed to identify the learning styles of students who use the Independent Learning Centre (ILC) on a regular basis at a state university in Turkey. In the first instalment of a new three-part column (edited by Katherine Thornton), Michael Allhouse describes the changes that have taken place at the SAC his institution in the UK, and how he responded to those changes. Drawing on theories of motivation and self-regulation, Mayumi Abe, Satomi Yoshimuta, Seigakuin, and Huw Davies present a visual tool developed in Japan that can be used in advising and teaching. In their short article, Craig Manning, Brian R. Morrison, and Tara McIlroy present three different perspectives on using Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) in educational contexts within Japan. Finally, Janine Berger describes a ‘work in progress’ whereby EFL students in Ecuador are encouraged to take their learning beyond the classroom by using game-like learning techniques. We hope you enjoy this issue and maybe consider submitting a paper for our upcoming special issue on ‘dialogue and advising and self-access learning’ to be published in March, 2015. Details can be found on the website: http://sisaljournal.org/for-authors/dialogue-and-advising/
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  SiSAL Journal Vol. 5, No. 3, September 2014, 200-201   ## Contents: Volume 5, Number 3, September 2014 Edited by Jo Mynard   Research Articles   ã   Exploring the Concept of Learner Autonomy in Cross-cultural Research  by Nga Thanh Nguyen, Donna Tangen and Denise Beutel (202-216) ã   The Effect of Computer-Based Self-Access Learning on Weekly  Vocabulary Test Scores by Jordan Dreyer   (217-234)   ã   Possibilities of Independent Learning in Two Self-access Facilities of an Iranian University   by Afshin Mohammadi (235-245)   ã   Learning Styles of Independent Learning Centre Users by Tarik Uzun (246-264)  Regular Column ã   Introduction   by column editor, Katherine Thornton (265)   ã   Room 101: The Social SAC   by Michael Allhouse (265-276)   Descriptions of Practice ã    “Now maybe I feel like trying”: Engaging Learners Using a Visual Tool by Mayumi Abe, Satomi Yoshimuta, and Huw Davies (277-293)   ã   MOOCs in Language Education and Professional Teacher Development: Possibilities and Potential by Craig Manning, Brian R. Morrison and Tara McIlroy (295-208) Work in Progress ã   Game-based methods to Encourage EFL Learners to Transition to  Autonomous Learning   by Janine Berger (309-314)   Announcements ã   Upcoming Special Issue: Call for papers Special Issue on dialogue and advising in self-access Learning  . March, 2015 (Volume 6, Issue 1) edited by Hisako Yamashita and Jo Mynard. DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: December 10th, 2014. Editorial by Jo Mynard, Kanda University of International Studies, Japan This is the 18 th  issue of SiSAL Journal and includes contributions from Australia, the USA, Iran, Turkey, the UK, Japan, and Ecuador.  SiSAL Journal Vol. 5, No. 3, September 2014, 200-201   #$ The first article by Nga Thanh Nguyen, Donna Tangen and  Denise Beutel   is a study that explores how the concept of learner autonomy is understood and used in Vietnamese higher educational settings. In the second article, Jordan Dreyer describes a study designed to investigate the effectiveness of using an online vocabulary study tool, Quizlet, in an urban high school language arts class in the USA. The third article, by Afshin Mohammadi,  reports on research which investigates learners’ views and practices with regards to two facilities at an Iranian university The article by Tarik Uzun  describes a study designed to identify the learning styles of students who use the Independent Learning Centre (ILC) on a regular basis at a state university in Turkey. In the first instalment of a new three-part column (edited by Katherine Thornton), Michael Allhouse  describes the changes that have taken place at the SAC his institution in the UK, and how he responded to those changes. Drawing on theories of motivation and self-regulation, Mayumi Abe, Satomi Yoshimuta, Seigakuin, and  Huw Davies  present a visual tool developed in Japan that can be used in advising and teaching. In their short article, Craig Manning, Brian R. Morrison , and Tara McIlroy   present three different perspectives on using Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) in educational contexts within Japan. Finally, Janine Berger  describes a ‘work in progress’ whereby EFL students in Ecuador are encouraged to take their learning beyond the classroom by using game-like learning techniques. We hope you enjoy this issue and maybe consider submitting a paper for our upcoming special issue on ‘dialogue and advising and self-access learning’ to be  published in March, 2015. Details can be found on the website: http://sisaljournal.org/for-authors/dialogue-and-advising/  Acknowledgements I am grateful to authors, reviewers and members of the editorial team who helped to  produce this issue.  SiSAL Journal Vol. 5, No. 3, September 2014, 202-216   202 Exploring the Concept of Learner Autonomy in Cross-Cultural Research  Nga Thanh Nguyen, Queensland University of Technology, Australia Donna Tangen, Queensland University of Technology, Australia Denise Beutel, Queensland University of Technology, Australia Abstract This research explores how the concept of learner autonomy is understood and used in Vietnamese higher educational settings. Data were collected through interviews in Vietnamese with four university lecturers in Hanoi, Vietnam and then reported in an English language thesis. The problems confronted by the lecturers were in understanding the concept of learner autonomy, the complexities of translation equivalence for the concept from one language to another, and the impact of culture in interpreting the concept of learner autonomy. The paper concludes with recommendations for educators to be sensitive to cultural and linguistic considerations when transferring concepts from one culture to another.  Key words : learner autonomy, cross-cultural research, higher education, Vietnamese context While various concepts and models have been introduced (mainly by Western researchers) into Asian contexts for quite some time (Yang, 2012), many of these concepts may be not only messy in their srcinal contexts, but may also be contradictory to Asian cultural contexts. A better understanding of how or even if, such concepts can be used in different cultures needs further exploration. This research focuses on exploring the concept of learner autonomy in Vietnamese higher education, addressing the questions:  How do Vietnamese lecturers understand the concept of learner autonomy?  and  How do Vietnamese lecturers incorporate the concept of learner autonomy in their  pedagogy?  As we will argue in this paper, before lecturers can enact beliefs about any learning concept (e.g. learner autonomy), they must first understand that concept. Without such understanding any idea introduced is unlikely to be taken up by lecturers,  particularly a concept foreign in language and culture. This paper reports on three
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