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This is a syllabus for one of my classes at UW-La Crosse
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  MGT 408: GLOBAL RESPONSIBILITY OF BUSINESS Fall 2014 Required text: Michael A. Santoro. China 2020: How Western Business Can - and Should - Influence Social and  Political Change in the Coming Decade . Cornell, 2009. Judith Shapiro. China’s Environmental Challenges . Polity, 2012. Recommended texts: David Bornstein and Susan Davis. Social Entrepreneurship: What Everyone Needs to Know . Oxford, 2010. Suggested Readings:  Economist  , The New York Times,  and The Wall Street Journal. Course Description This course considers the evolution of the social contract and how it impacts theories of business ethics, the purpose and conduct of business, ethics and values at work,    public health, social entrepreneurship, access to medicine for the poor, global environmental challenges, a framework of global human rights, and the impacts of economic and social globalization. Writing Emphasis. Prerequisite: senior standing. Offered Fall, Spring. Page of 113    Student Learning Objectives By the end of the semester, I hope that you acquire a knowledge base and a set of tools that allow you to analyze global corporate social responsibility issues both in your personal and  professional life, as well as the enthusiasm and desire to apply them. Students who successfully complete this course should be able to: ãDevelop a global mindset that is crucial to the personal and professional success of the contemporary manager. ãUnderstand the basic principles and major theories of global corporate social responsibility, as well as apply these principles and theories to real-world situations. ãUnderstand the responsibilities of a manager, employee, consumer, shareholder, human being, and corporation to the global society in which we live and work. ãRecognize the importance of, and challenges to, ethics, social responsibility and environmental sustainability. ãAdvance your research, report-writing, presentation, and public speaking skills. CBA Undergraduate Program Outcomes ãCommunication Goal: Students will convey information and ideas in professional business reports : http://www.uwlax.edu/uploadedFiles/Academics/Colleges_Schools/College_of_Business_Administration/Written%20Communication%20Rubric_Final_Aug%201%202012.pdf ãStudents will convey information and ideas in oral presentations: http://www.uwlax.edu/uploadedFiles/Academics/Colleges_Schools/College_of_Business_Administration/Oral%20Communication_Final_Aug%201%202012.pdf ãDecision Making and Critical Thinking Goal: Our students will be able to think critically when evaluating decisions: http://www.uwlax.edu/uploadedFiles/Academics/Colleges_Schools/College_of_Business_Administration/Critical%20Thinking%20Rubric_Final_Aug%201%202012.pdf ãGlobal Context of Business Goal: Our students will be prepared to serve others in a global environment: http://www.uwlax.edu/uploadedFiles/Academics/Colleges_Schools/College_of_Business_Administration/Global%20Rubric_Final_Aug%201%202012.pdf Page of 213  ãMajor (Management) Competency Goal: Our students will be proficient in the primary functional area of study. ãSocial Responsibility Goal: Our students will be prepared to be socially responsible citizens: http://www.uwlax.edu/uploadedFiles/Academics/Colleges_Schools/College_of_Business_Administration/Social%20Responsibility%20Rubric_Draft_Aug%2027%202012.pdf   How to Study The following factors are key to doing well in this class: ãBefore each class, read the assigned reading carefully. Write notes about each reading to help you understand what you just read. Reviewing these notes is a great way to do well on exams. Write down questions you have from the readings. Bring them to class and ask the instructor during class so that everyone can benefit from this intellectual exchange. ãBefore each class, reviewing class notes from previous classes. ãAfter each class, review and organize the notes you just took. ãTake careful notes of everything the instructor writes on the board. Nearly all exam questions will come from lectures. ãDiligently outline, organize, and review your class notes is an excellent way to prepare for each exam. ãVisit during office hours as often as possible. I am here to help you learn. Please feel free to stop by when you have questions, concerns, or just want to talk. Assignments and Course Evaluation Scheme Page of 313  Grading – any issues concerning grading need to be called to my attention within one week of receipt of the grading. Grades assigned at the end of the semester are not negotiable. EVALUATION CRITERIA FOR OVERALL PERFORMANCE   A = Excellent Students earning this grade will have demonstrated a clearly superior level of  performance and understanding of the course material. They will have a clearly excellent  portfolio (in all its dimensions), an excellent record of engagement and a similarly excellent set of exams/quizzes and assessments. Students earning an A in this course will demonstrate considerable value-added in the work and insights they generate in this class. They will consistently raise, and answer, insightful questions and their answers will demonstrate a nuanced and sophisticated level of understanding. They will consistently explore issues beyond the obvious and, in doing so, will add significant intellectual value beyond what the professor said or imparted in class. B = Good Students earning this grade will have demonstrated a good level of performance and understanding of the course material, beyond the minimum required. They will have a good quality portfolio (in all its dimensions), a good record of engagement and a similarly good set of exams/assessments. Students earning a B in this course will demonstrate good value-added in the work and insights they themselves generate in this class. They will periodically raise, and answer, insightful questions and their answers will demonstrate a reasonable level of nuance and understanding. They will periodically explore issues beyond the obvious and will add intellectual value beyond simply repeating what the professor said or imparted in class. C = Acceptable  Students earning this grade will have demonstrated an adequate level of  performance and understanding of the course material, but little that suggests an understanding  beyond the minimum required. They will have an acceptable quality portfolio (in all its dimensions), an acceptable record of engagement and a similarly acceptable set of exams/assessments. Students earning a C in this course will have met the basic requirements for this course, but will not have worked at a level beyond that. They will rarely raise, or attempt to Page of 413
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