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The Rise and Decline of European Parliaments

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   DISCUSSION PAPER SERIES   ABCD www.cepr.org  Available online at: www.cepr.org/pubs/dps/DP7809.asp  www.ssrn.com/xxx/xxx/xxx   No. 7809 THE RISE AND DECLINE OF EUROPEAN PARLIAMENTS, 1188-1789 Jan Luiten van Zanden, Eltjo Buringh and Maarten Bosker INTERNATIONAL MACROECONOMICS  ISSN 0265-8003 THE RISE AND DECLINE OF EUROPEAN PARLIAMENTS, 1188-1789 Jan Luiten van Zanden, Utrecht University  Eltjo Buringh, Utrecht University Maarten Bosker, Utrecht University   Discussion Paper No. 7809 May 2010 Centre for Economic Policy Research 53–56 Gt Sutton St, London EC1V 0DG, UK Tel: (44 20) 7183 8801, Fax: (44 20) 7183 8820 Email: cepr@cepr.org , Website: www.cepr.org This Discussion Paper is issued under the auspices of the Centre’s research programme in  INTERNATIONAL MACROECONOMICS . Any opinions expressed here are those of the author(s) and not those of the Centre for Economic Policy Research. Research disseminated by CEPR may include views on policy, but the Centre itself takes no institutional policy positions. The Centre for Economic Policy Research was established in 1983 as an educational charity, to promote independent analysis and public discussion of open economies and the relations among them. It is pluralist and non-partisan, bringing economic research to bear on the analysis of medium- and long-run policy questions. These Discussion Papers often represent preliminary or incomplete work, circulated to encourage discussion and comment. Citation and use of such a paper should take account of its provisional character. Copyright: Jan Luiten van Zanden, Eltjo Buringh and Maarten Bosker  CEPR Discussion Paper No. 7809 May 2010  ABSTRACT The Rise and Decline of European Parliaments, 1188-1789* Starting in Spain in the twelfth century, parliaments gradually spread over the Latin West. The paper quantifies the activity of medieval and early-modern parliaments, which also makes it possible to analyse the influence of this institutional innovation. In the early-modern period parliaments declined in influence in southern and central Europe and gained in importance in the Netherlands and Britain. From the sixteenth century onwards active parliaments, which function as constraints on the executive, had a positive effect on city growth and appear to have been instrumental in stabilizing the currency. Active pre-1800 parliaments also enhanced the quality of democratic institutions in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. JEL Classification: Keywords: Jan Luiten van Zanden Economic and Social History Department University of Utrecht Drift 10 Utrecht 3512 BS THE NETHERLANDS Email: jvz@iisg.nl For further Discussion Papers by this author see: www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?authorid=161704 Eltjo Buringh Postdoctoral researcher University of Utrecht THE NETHERLANDS Email: e.buringh@uu.nl For further Discussion Papers by this author see: www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?authorid=168253  Maarten Bosker Groningen University Faculty of Economics and Business Dept. of International Economics and Bus Postbus 800 9700 AV Groningen THE NETHERLANDS Email: e.m.bosker@rug.nl For further Discussion Papers by this author see: www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?authorid=168254 *This paper is produced as part of the project Historical Patterns of Development and Underdevelopment: Origins and Persistence of the Great Divergence (HI-POD), a Collaborative Project funded by the European Commission's Seventh Research Framework Programme, Contract number 225342. Submitted 04 January 2010
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