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Touchdown a Minute Rules

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boardgame rules
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  1 Touchdown-A-Minute Football Touchdown-A-Minute Football was designed for any fan wanting to keep the grid-iron action going, even though the weekend's games are over. Touchdown-A-Minute gives you the chance to play your favorite football team, taking on the role of its head coach. Grab your dice, find a friend and prepare to play the greatest game on earth! Assembling Your Game Even though it only takes a few minutes to learn how to play Touchdown-A-Minute Football, there are a few things you need to do before you can get started. Components Your Touchdown-A-Minute game includes the following components: ã   4 Blank white Play Dice which, once you apply the appropriate stickers, are used to resolve each play. ã   4 Blank red Offense Dice which, once you apply the appropriate stickers, are used by the coach of the defensive team to choose a strategy for each play. ã   4 Blank blue Defense Dice which, once you apply the appropriate stickers, are used by the coach of the defensive team to choose a strategy for each play. ã   1 Sheet of Stickers that you will apply to the dice, as described below. ã   1 Rule book (you're holding it right now!) ã   1 Scoreboard, printed on the back of the cover insert. You'll also need a dice cup (a coffee mug will do fine, especially if it has your favorite team's logo on it!) and a table large enough for rolling the dice and keeping score. You can keep track of information like the score, yards to go for first down and position on the field on a piece of scratch paper, or you can use dimes on the included Scoreboard to indicate that information. Setting Up The Dice Before you can play, you need to assemble the dice. Be very careful when doing this as the stickers must be applied to the correct dice in order to ensure proper game play! ã   Apply all of the Red Run Inside Stickers to one of the blank Red Dice. ã   Apply all of the Red Run Outside Stickers to one of the blank Red Dice. ã   Apply all of the Red Short Pass Stickers to one of the blank Red Dice. ã   Apply all of the Red Long Pass Stickers to one of the blank Red Dice. ã   Apply all of the Blue Stop Run Stickers to one of the blank Blue Dice. ã   Apply all of the Blue Nickel Defense Stickers to one of the blank Blue Dice. ã   Apply all of the Blue Dime Defense Stickers to one of the blank Blue Dice. ã   Apply all of the Blue Blitz Stickers to one of the blank Blue Dice. ã   Apply the white stickers to the white dice, making sure to place all of the stickers marked with a 1 on one die, all of the stickers marked with a 2 on a second, and so on. Once your game is properly assembled, you're ready to play! Before the Game In real football, a good coach knows his team's strengths and calls his plays accordingly. The same is true in Touchdown-a-Minute Football. Team Strength Before the game begins, each coach selects a single strength for his team. It can be an offensive strength  2 (the team is strong running inside or with the short pass) or it can be defensive (the team has a strong nickel defense or blitz). Each team may select just one strength, offensive or defensive; the coach selects this one strength and writes it down, and both coaches reveal them to each other before starting the game. Opposing teams can have the same strength. For example, Chris selects Long Pass as his team's strength and then writes it down. Dave picks Blitz as his team strength and writes it down. They show each other their team strength before play begins. Applying Strengths During the Game A coach can apply his team's strengths to one play each quarter (there are 30 plays per quarter, as described later). After the dice have been rolled to determine the results of a play, each coach gets an opportunity to apply his team's strength to change that result, how that works is described later in these rules. Home Field Advantage One coach's team is playing on its home field, and the other team is visiting. This can be determined with a coin toss, simple agreement or in any other way acceptable to both players. The player with the home field advantage can force one reroll in the second quarter and another reroll in the fourth quarter of the game. In this case, the entire play is nullified, new offensive and defensive dice are selected for the play and all dice are rerolled. Coin Toss Just like in real football, toss a coin with the visiting team picking heads or tails. The winner selects whether to kick or receive to start the game, and the roles are reversed to start the third quarter. Write down who kicked off in the first quarter so you're sure to have the other team kickoff in the third quarter. Running Plays Most plays are concluded in the manner described here. Special plays, such as kicks and their returns, extra points, and fumble or interception recoveries have special rules that follow. 1.   Offense, take the field!   The coach whose team has the ball is the offensive player, so he takes the red offensive dice until there is a change of possession. 2.   Defense, take the field!   The coach of the other team is the defensive player, so he takes the blue defensive dice until there is a change of possession. 3.   The Play Dice.   Place all four of the white Play Dice into the dice cup. Offensive Strengths Run Inside GN 5 or First Down Run Outside GN 5 or First Down Short Pass CP 5 or First Down Long Pass CP 10 or First Down Defensive Strengths Stop Run TK Nickel Defense BP Dime Defense IN Blitz SK 4.   Choose a Strategy Die  . Both players secretly select a strategy die for the play, represented by one of their red or blue dice. The offensive options are: ã   Run Inside  (this die represents hands-off straight ahead, running off tackle right into the teeth of the defensive front, including sneaks and delays) ã   Run Outside  (this die represents hand-offs or pitches outside the tackles, including reverses and options) ã   Short Pass (this die is for pass plays on crossing or other short routines, including screens and dump-offs) ã   Long Pass (this die is for pass plays on hitch-and-go or other deep routes including deep posts and corner routes) The defensive options are: ã   Stop Run (this die represents eight-in-the-box run stuffing line-ups) ã   Nickel Defense (this die puts the defensive backs ready to advance to tackle a runner or drop back into coverage)  3 ã   Dime Defense (this die is for a limited pass rush with defensive backs and secondary positioned against deeper pass routes) ã   Blitz (this die is for any one of a variety of packages of defensive backs and ends rushing the quarterback to disrupt the play) The offensive coach choose the red die corresponding to his strategy choice and drops it into the cup without telling the other player what it is. The defensive coach does the same thing with one of his blue dice. For example, Chris (the offensive coach) wants to run a conservative play up the middle, so he selected the Run Inside die. Dave (the defensive coach) thinks Chris might try to catch him napping with a pass play, so selects the Nickel Defense die to hedge his bets. 5.   The    Snap!   The offensive player picks up the dice cup, gives it a good shake, and rolls the dice on the table. Remember, there will always be a total of six dice in the cup: four play dice, one offensive red die, and one defensive blue die. 6.   Play Execution  . Group the dice according to the results indicated on them. Thus, there might be 3 dice showing a GN result, 2 showing a BP result, and so on. When the offensive player has selected a running strategy (Run Inside or Run Outside) GN and TK are important, and CP and BP results are ignored. The type of play (run or pass) is determined by the offensive strategy die: Run Inside and Run Outside are running plays, while Short Pass and Long Pass are passing plays. For example, Chris rolls the dice and gets the following results: GN 5, GN 4, GN 1, CP 4, TK, and IN. Chris had chosen Run Inside, and since it was a running play, the CP and IN rolls are ignored. Each TK cancels one GN result, chosen by the defensive player. So, he would cancel the GN 5, leaving the GN 4 and GN 1, which are added together; the result of this play is a gain of 5. Appearances of IN, FM, and SK may result in turnovers or sacks; see below. 7.   Marching Down the Field! Keep track of downs, yards to go, and field positions with coins or other markers on the Scoreboard. The rules are just like for normal football: gain ten yards in four downs to achieve a first down, otherwise the ball changes possession. Players can elect to punt or kick a field goal at any time, as described below. 8.   Huddle Up! The players retrieve their offensive and defensive dice and select new strategies for the next play, beginning again with Step 3. Normal Play Results Running Plays CP and BP results are ignored when the offensive player selects a running play. Whenever there are more TK results than GN results, the runner is dropped behind the line of scrimmage, one yard per additional TK. Yardage for uncanceled GN results are added together to determine the length of the run. When no GN results are rolled and a FM result appears, there is a fumble (see below). For example, Chris selects Run Inside and Dave selects Blitz. Chris rolls all six dice and gets GN 5, GN 2, GN 1, CP 4, TK and BP. Since it's a running play the CP 4 and BP are ignored. The remaining TK cancels one of the GN dice, and Dave selects the GN 5. That leaves GN 2 and GN 1, earning the result of the play was a gain of 3. In another example, if Chris had rolled GN 1, GN 2, CP 4, TK, TK and BP, the result would have been no gain, since the CP 4 and BP are ignored, and the two TK results cancel both GN dice. In yet another example, if Chris had rolled GN 1, CP 4, TK, TK, TK and BP, the result would have been a loss of 2 yards. Again, the CP 4 and BP would be ignored because it's a running play, and one of the three TK cancel the only GN die, leaving two TK dropping the runner a yard each behind the line of scrimmage. In a final running play example, if Chris had rolled CP 4, TK, TK, TK and BP and FM, the runner fumbles the ball since there are no GN results and at least one FM. The fumble rule that follows explains where the ball is fumbled and how far it is returned by the defensive team.  4 Pass Play TK and GN results are ignored when the offensive player selects a pass play. Whenever all the CP results are cancelled by BP, the pass is incomplete. Additional BP results have no effect. Yardage for uncanceled CP results are added together to determine the length of the pass and run after catch. When no CP results are rolled and an IN result appears, there is an interception (see below). For example, Chris picked Short Pass and Dave picked Nickel Defense. Chris rolls all six dice and gets CP 4, CP 3, GN 3, GN 1, TK and TK. Since it is a passing play, the GN and TK results are all ignored. There are no BP results to cancel the CP dice, so the result of the play is a completion for 7 yards. In another example, if Chris had rolled CP 4, CP 3, GN 1, BP, BP and TK, the result of the play would be an incomplete pass, since there are two BP results to cancel the two CP results. In yet another example, if Chris had rolled CP 4, CP 3, GN 13, BP, BP and BP, the result of the play would still be an incomplete pass, since having more BP than CP results has no effect. In a final passing example, if Chris had rolled GN 1, TK, BP, BP, BP and IN, the ball would be intercepted, since no CP results were rolled at all and an IN came up. The interception rule that follows describes where the ball was interrupted and how far the defensive team runs it back. Long Gains The GN L and CP L result mean 'Long Gain.' Long Gains are special. Uncanceled Long Gain results multiply other uncanceled GN or CP yards by 10. For example, if there is a GN L, GN 2 and GN 3 left uncanceled on a running play, the total gain is 50 yards (2 plus 3 times 10). Left with no other uncanceled yardage results, a single Long Gain result counts as a gain of 10 yards. For example, if on a running play this dice come up GN L, CP 6, CP 1, BP, BP and FM, the result is a gain of 10, since the long gain is not canceled but has no other GN to multiply with. Special Plays and Circumstances Fumbles After the dice are rolled on a running play, if there is at least one FM result and no GN results (before any TK results cancel GN results), the ball is fumbled. If there are more red results than blue showing, the ball is fumbled 2 yards downfield for every red result. If there are more blue results than red showing (or on a tie), the ball is fumbled at the line of scrimmage. The fumbled ball is recovered by the opposing team and may be run back by rolling all four play dice (with no strategy dice); this is conducted as a running play, but all other rules apply (there can be another fumble on the run back, for instance). If two or more fumble results are showing, the run back automatically results in a touchdown for the recovering team. Run back plays do not count against the length of the game. For example, Chris Runs Inside against Dave's Dime Defense, rolling CP 6, CP 2, CP 2, CP 1, TK and FM. Since there was no GN result at all and a FM appeared, the ball is fumbled. Of these six, there are four red faces (all four CPs) and two blue results (the FM and TK), so the ball is fumbled 8 yards downfield from the line of scrimmage (2 yards for each red result). The defensive player puts all four white play dice back in the cup and rolls for the run back, rolling GN 5, GN 2, TK and BP; the ball is run back 5 yards. Interceptions After the dice are rolled on a passing play, if there is at least one IN result and no CP results (before any BP results cancel CP results) the ball is intercepted. If there are more red results than blue showing, the ball is intercepted 4 yards downfield for every red result. If there are more blue results than red showing (or on a tie), the ball is intercepted at the line of scrimmage.
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