Documents

Educational Uses for the Oakland County in the Civil War Map

Description
Educational Uses for the Oakland County in the Civil War Map Besides being a beautiful piece of art and a history treasure the Oakland County in the Civil War Map is also an excellent instructional tool.
Categories
Published
of 117
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
Educational Uses for the Oakland County in the Civil War Map Besides being a beautiful piece of art and a history treasure the Oakland County in the Civil War Map is also an excellent instructional tool. For young students it serves as an engaging special purpose, or thematic, map with local connections. For older students it provides a remarkable opportunity for teaching about the Civil War in a way no textbook can do. A set of curriculum materials has been designed to accompany the map. These include: 1. A set of lessons correlated to both national and state literacy and history standards. These lessons use primary sources from the map to engage students in historical inquiry. 2. A set of lesson launchers which are short primary-source activities designed to launch a textbook lesson on the Civil War. These activities provide a local connection to the people, places and events studied in a Civil War unit. 3. A set of resources including Regiment Rosters of Oakland County Soldiers, Service Records and other information that can be used by teachers and students for research purposes. New lessons and resources will be added in the next two years to fit multiple grade levels and instructional purposes. Lesson 1: Introduction to the Oakland County in the Civil War Map Civil War Content Connection(s) Primary Sources from the Civil War era LESSON ABSTRACT In this lesson students are introduced to the Oakland County in the Civil War Map. The lesson begins with an activity to assess students prior knowledge of Oakland County. As the primary activity of the lesson students participate In a simple simulation in which they work in groups to design a plan for creating a map showing connections between Oakland County and the Civil War. Finally, students analyze the map itself, categorize the items on the map and compare the map to the one they designed. Aligned Content Expectations/Standards Michigan Social Studies Content Expectations 8 U5.2.1 to 8 U5.2.5 Evaluate the multiple causes, key events, and complex consequences of the Civil War. K1.7 Integrate concepts from at least two different social studies disciplines. Common Core State Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies (grades 6-8) 7 Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts. Lesson Sequence 1. As a way of assessing students prior knowledge of Oakland County have each student independently complete the What Do You Know About Oakland County? sheet located in Supplemental Materials for this lesson. Using the Answer Sheet located in the Supplemental Materials go over the correct answers with students and have them place their scores at the top of the page. Take a quick tally of student scores. 2. Lead a brief discussion about Oakland County using the following questions: What information did you already know about Oakland County? What information surprised you about Oakland County? Why do you think many people living in Oakland County know little about it? 3. Using the information found in Numbers 9 and 10 on the sheet used in Step 1 discuss how Oakland County has had a long and rich history. Explain that although, like the rest of Michigan, the land in the county was not directly involved in the Civil War, many people were involved. Therefore, Oakland County has many connections to the Civil War. 4. Place students in small groups and give each group a copy of the Map Planning Sheet located in the Supplemental Materials. Explain that groups are to work together to design a plan for creating a Map showing Civil War Connections to Oakland County. Go over the four questions on the Planning Sheet which groups must answer. Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 1 of 7 Grade 8 Lesson 1 5. Give groups time to complete their plan. Then, have each group present their plan to the large group. After each presentation discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the plan presented. When all groups have presented guide students in identifying similarities as well as differences among the plans. 6. Display the actual Oakland County in the Civil War map. Ask students to describe the overall structure of the map. Then, ask them to identify specific kinds of information found on the map. Note that information includes artifacts such as a regimental flag, photographs, diagrams, a diary entry, illustrations of houses belonging to Civil War soldiers, the location of Civil War monuments, sites relating to the Underground Railroad and information about specific and regiments. Make sure to guide students in differentiating between primary and secondary sources included on the map. 7. Display the How the Map Was Created Information Sheet located in the Supplemental Materials which describes the process used to create the map and have students compare this to their own plans for creating a map from Step If time permits share the following specific changes made during the drafting of the map and ask students to hypothesize why these changes were made: A replica of a Union soldier s hat was replaced by a hat actually owned and worn by an Oakland County soldier. The wording was changed on a text box describing a soldier who had supposedly been in Andersonville prison when research failed to substantiate his being a prisoner there. A photo of a cartridge case similar to those used in the Civil War but invented in the 1870s was replaced by a log filled with bullets from the Battle of Chickamauga Research Opportunities for students: Investigate other history-related maps created for Oakland County such as the Native Americans in Oakland County map located at: Investigate primary sources relating to the Civil War and Michigan at this site: Suggested Next Lesson: Lesson 2 Oakland County Soldiers in Michigan Civil War Regiments Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 2 of 7 Grade 8 Lesson 1 SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS FOR LESSON Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 3 of 7 Grade 8 Lesson 1 What Do You Know About Oakland County? Directions: Shade in Oakland County on the map below: Directions: Fill in the blanks in the statements below. 1. The area of Oakland County is square miles. 2. According to the 2010 census the population of Oakland County is about 3. Oakland County is home to cities, villages and townships. 4. There are about businesses located in Oakland County. 5. Oakland County is Michigan s leading center for international commercial activity with approximately companies representing countries with business locations in the county. 6. Over % of Michigan s computer and electronic product manufacturers are located in Oakland County. 7. Oakland County has more natural lakes than any other county in the Great Lake State. There are approximately inland lakes and the headwaters of major rivers 8. Oakland County has acres of parkland. 9. Oakland County was created by Territorial Governor Lewis Cass in. 10. Oakland County has nationally registered historic districts and about individual historic sites. There are local historic museums in the county. Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 4 of 7 Grade 8 Lesson 1 What Do You Know About Oakland County? Answer Sheet Directions: Shade in Oakland County on the map below: Directions: Fill in the blanks in the statements below. 1. The area of Oakland County is 910 square miles. 2. According to the 2010 census the population of Oakland County is about 1,200, Oakland County is home to 62 cities, villages and townships. 4. There are about 42,000 businesses located in Oakland County. 5. Oakland County is Michigan s leading center for international commercial activity with approximately 700 companies representing 37 countries with business locations in the county. 6. Over 26% of Michigan s computer and electronic product manufacturers are located in Oakland County. 7. Oakland County has more natural lakes than any other county in the Great Lake State. There are approximately 1,450 inland lakes and the headwaters of 5 major rivers 8. Oakland County has 89,000 acres of parkland. 9. Oakland County was created by Territorial Governor Lewis Cass in Oakland County has 21 nationally registered historic districts and about 200 individual historic sites. There are 31 local historic museums in the county. Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 5 of 7 Grade 8 Lesson 1 Group Planning Sheet Your Task: Design a plan for creating a Map showing Oakland County connections to the Civil War. Answer the questions below and then be prepared to share your plan with the other groups. GROUP MEMBERS: What kinds of information, illustrations, photographs and other details will you include on your map? How will you locate the information, illustrations, photographs and other details? How will you organize your map? What challenges and/or obstacles do you think there will be in creating your map? Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 6 of 7 Grade 8 Lesson 1 How the Map Was Created 1. The Oakland County Historical Commission decided to create a map showing Oakland Connections to the Civil War as a Civil War Sesquicentennial project. 2. The Commission asked Oakland County Planning and Economic Development Services (PEDS) to assist with the map because this department had produced historic maps relating to Oakland County in the past. 3. A historic researcher volunteered to gather the information needed for the map. She contacted all Oakland County museums, historical societies, libraries, among others to gather information. This process led to the collection of a huge amount material, so much that not all of it could be included on the map. 4. A team sorted through the material and chose items for the map. 5. A draft was created and shared with groups and individuals who had offered information for the map. People were asked to critically review the map and offer suggestions for changes. A second draft of the map was created based on these suggestions. 6. This draft was thoroughly reviewed by a Civil War historian and a specialist in history education. A few issues were identified during this review including some historical inaccuracies. In addition, suggestions were made for replacing some items with others with more direct connection to Oakland County. 7. A third draft of the map was created based on this review. This draft became the final version. Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 7 of 7 Grade 8 Lesson 1 Lesson 2: Oakland County Soldiers in Michigan Civil War Regiments Civil War Content Connection(s) Organizational Structure of the Civil War Armies Types of regiments Response to Lincoln s call for troops LESSON ABSTRACT In this lesson students explore the organizational structure of the Civil War armies and then analyze data relating to Oakland County soldiers in various Michigan regiments. In addition, they read brief histories of specific regiments and create a chart summarizing information on the five regiments which contained the most Oakland County soldiers. Aligned Content Expectations/Standards Michigan Social Studies Content Expectations 8 U5.2.1 to 8 U5.2.5 Evaluate the multiple causes, key events, and complex consequences of the Civil War. P2.2 Read and interpret data in tables and graphs. Common Core State Standards: Literacy in History/Social Studies (grades 6-8) 2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions. 7 Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts. Lesson Sequence 1. Point out the graphic organizer showing the organizational structure of the Civil War armies located on the left side of the Oakland County in the Civil War Map or display the Map Resource showing the organizer which is included in the Supplemental Materials for this lesson. Using the organizer and the additional information on the Civil War Army Organization Reference Sheet included in the Supplemental Materials discuss the structure of the army. 2. Have students locate specific examples in their textbook of the terms used on the organizer such as Army of the Potomac or Calvary Brigade. 3. Give each student a copy of the chart showing Oakland County Soldiers in Michigan Regiments and explain the difference between the two right columns on the chart using the following information: Accurate data relating to soldiers in Civil War regiments can often be difficult to locate and requires the use of multiple sources such as census records, regimental rosters, enlistment papers and Michigan s publication entitled Record of Service. The column labeled Confirmed Oakland County Residents refers to soldiers who definitely lived in Oakland County prior to becoming soldiers. This data was verified either through the 1850 or 1860 census or the Record of Service. The column labeled Oakland County Residents, Enlistees and Draftees includes those listed in the column described above as well as people who enlisted in Oakland County, but may or may Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 1 of 10 Grade 8 Lesson 2 not have been living in Oakland County at the time they enlisted. It also includes substitutes hired by Oakland County draftees. These substitutes may have come from somewhere else. 4. Explain that students will now be analyzing the data on the chart and learning about some of the regiments listed on the chart. Give each student copies of the following materials located in the Supplemental Materials: The Analyzing Data Activity sheet The information text sheets entitled Short Regimental Histories 5. Go over the two sets of directions on the Analyzing Data activity sheet and then give students time to complete the activity. Note that an Answer Sheet has been included in the Supplemental Materials for you to use in assessing the completed student activity sheets. Research Opportunities for students: Research one of the regiments explored in this lesson using a website such as the following: Use the Internet to research one of the commanding officers listed in the regiments. Suggested Next Lesson: Lesson 3 Dinner in Holly for a Thousand Soldiers Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 2 of 10 Grade 8 Lesson 2 SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS FOR LESSON Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 3 of 10 Grade 8 Lesson 2 Map Resource Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 4 of 10 Grade 8 Lesson 2 Civil War Army Organization Reference sheet COMPANY A company was the basic unit in a Civil War army and had approximately 100 men commanded by a captain. Companies were named with the letters A K, however, J was not used because it looked too much like an I. REGIMENT A regiment usually contained ten companies and had approximately 1,000 soldiers commanded by a colonel. If a unit had only four to eight companies, it was called a battalion rather than a regiment. BRIGADE A brigade contained an average of four regiments and had approximately 4000 men commanded by a brigadier general. Union brigades were named with numbers but Confederate brigades were often named after their current or former commanding officers. DIVISION A division was made up of from three to five brigades and had approximately 12,000 men commanded by a major general. Confederate divisions often contained more brigades than Union divisions CORPS A corps had on average three divisions and consisted of approximately 36,000 men commanded by a major general on the Union side or a lieutenant general on the Confederate side. ARMY An army was made up of from one to eight corps. It was commanded by a general. The Union often named its armies after rivers or waterways such as the Army of the Potomac. The Confederacy name its armies after states or regions such as the Army of Northern Virginia. Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 5 of 10 Grade 8 Lesson 2 REGIMENT OAKLAND COUNTY CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS IN MICHIGAN REGIMENTS Confirmed Oakland County Residents Oakland County residents, enlistees and draftees 1 st Michigan Infantry nd Michigan Infantry rd Michigan Infantry (reorganized) th Michigan Infantry (reorganized) th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry (reorganized) th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry st Michigan Infantry nd Michigan Infantry rd Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry st Michigan Colored Infantry (102 nd U.S. Colored Infantry st Michigan Cavalry nd Michigan Cavalry rd Michigan Cavalry th Michigan Cavalry th Michigan Cavalry th Michigan Cavalry th Michigan Cavalry th Michigan Cavalry th Michigan Cavalry th Michigan Cavalry th Michigan Cavalry st Michigan Light Artillery th Independent Battery, Michigan Light Artillery st Michigan Engineers & Mechanics st Michigan Sharpshooters 1 3 Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 6 of 10 Grade 8 Lesson 2 Analyzing Data Directions: Rank order the five regiments that had the most confirmed Oakland County residents by filling in the chart below beginning with the regiment that had the highest number. REGIMENT Confirmed Oakland County Residents Directions: Use the information in the Short Regimental Histories to complete the chart for the 5 regiments you have listed above: Regiment Rendezvous (Place it was organized) Date it was mustered into Federal service Date it left Destination Date it was mustered out of Federal service Place it was mustered out of Federal service Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 7 of 10 Grade 8 Lesson 2 Analyzing Data Answer Sheet Rank order the five regiments that had the most confirmed Oakland County residents by filling in the chart below beginning with the regiment that had the highest number. REGIMENT Confirmed Oakland County Residents 22 nd Michigan Infantry th Michigan Cavalry th Michigan Cavalry th Michigan Infantry th Michigan Infantry 128 Use the information in the Short Regimental Histories to complete the chart for the 5 regiments you have listed above: Regiment Rendezvous (Place it was organized) Date it was mustered into Federal service Date it left Destination Date it was mustered out of Federal service Place it was mustered out of Federal service 22 nd Michigan Infantry Pontiac Aug 29, 1862 Sept. 4, 1862 Kentucky June 20, 1865 Nashville 8 th Michigan Cavalry Mt. Clemens May 2, 1863 May 12, 1863 Kentucky Sept. 22, 1865 Nashville 5 th Michigan Cavalry Detroit Aug. 30, 1862 Dec. 4, 1862 Washington June 2, 1865 Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 5 th Michigan Infantry Fort Wayne, Detroit Aug 28, 1861 Sept 11, 1861 To join the Army of the Potomac June 10, 1865 Jeffersonville, Indiana 10 th Michigan Infantry Flint Feb. 6, 1862 April 22,1862 Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee July 19, 1865 Louisville, Kentucky Oakland County Civil War Map Project Page 8 of 10 Grade 8 Lesson 2 SHORT REGIMENTAL HISTORIES 1 st Michigan Cavalry The First Cavalry began recruiting on August 21, 1861, at Camp Lyon, near Detroit, the place of rendezvous, the organization of the Regiment being under the direction of Thornton F. Brodhead who had been appointed its Colonel. It was mustered into United States service on the 13th of September. On the 29 th of September the Regiment left camp, under the command of Colonel Brodhead, with orders to proceed to Washington. The regiment was mustered out at Salt Lake City, Utah, Mar. 10, nd Michigan Cavalry The Second Cavalry was organized by the Honorable F.W. Kellogg of Grand Rapids, then a member of Congress, authority being given him by the Secretary of War, subject to the approval of the Governor of Michigan. The Regiment was rendezvoused at Grand Rapids, its recruitment being c
Search
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks
SAVE OUR EARTH

We need your sign to support Project to invent "SMART AND CONTROLLABLE REFLECTIVE BALLOONS" to cover the Sun and Save Our Earth.

More details...

Sign Now!

We are very appreciated for your Prompt Action!

x