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Weather and Climate. Part 1 Day 2. Clouds and Weather. Lets start off with BrainPop

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Weather and Climate Part 1 Day 2 Clouds and Weather Lets start off with BrainPop Weather and Climate Stratus Clouds: Flat layered clouds that spread like a blanket across the sky. Cumulus Clouds:
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Weather and Climate Part 1 Day 2 Clouds and Weather Lets start off with BrainPop Weather and Climate Stratus Clouds: Flat layered clouds that spread like a blanket across the sky. Cumulus Clouds: White, puffy clouds that appear to rise from flat bases. Cirrus Clouds: Look like wispy streaks or feathers. Cumulus Clouds Cumulus clouds are puffy white or light gray clouds that look like floating cotton balls. They have sharp outlines and a flat base. Image courtesy of Carlye Calvin Cumulus Clouds Occasionally Cumulus clouds show vertical development and produce tower-like extensions. These Cumulus clouds are in the early stages of development. Image courtesy of the UCAR Digital Image Library Cumulus Clouds This image of cumulus clouds was taken in in the mountains of Colorado. You can tell this was taken in the mountains because some of the clouds appear to be below the person taking the photograph! Image courtesy of Olga and Sergei Kuznetsov Cumulus Clouds This image of cumulus clouds was taken in the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve near Alamosa, Colorado. Image courtesy of Olga and Sergei Kuznetsov Cumulus Clouds Photo of cumulus clouds at sunset Image courtesy of Peggy LeMone Stratus Clouds This image of stratus clouds was taken in San Giamano, Tuscany, Italy. The stratus cloud appears as fog on the ground. Image courtesy of Sara Martin Stratus Clouds This image of stratus clouds was taken at sunrise in eastern Colorado. Stratus clouds usually cover the entire sky. Image courtesy of Gregory Thompson Stratus Clouds This type of stratus cloud forms in mountainous areas. Image courtesy of Olga and Sergei Kuznetsov Stratus Clouds This is an image of stratus clouds. Notice the difference in thickness and color in the clouds. Image courtesy of Keith G. Diem Stratus Clouds This image of stratus clouds was taken in Boulder, Colorado. Image courtesy of Carlye Calvin Stratus Clouds This photograph of stratus clouds was taken in Calgary, Canada. Notice the bright part of the cloud that is covering the sun. Image courtesy of Peggy LeMone Stratus Clouds This image of stratus clouds was taken near Moab, Utah. Image courtesy of Anne Pharamond Stratus Clouds This is an image of stratus clouds. Image courtesy of NASA Stratus Clouds This is an image of stratus clouds. You can see the sun through these clouds, as well as a big halo or circle around the sun. Image courtesy of NOAA s National Weather Service Cirrus Clouds Cirrus clouds are composed entirely of ice and consist of long, thin, wispy streamers. They are commonly known as mare's tails because of their appearance. Image courtesy of Lisa Gardiner Cirrus Clouds This is an image of cirrus clouds. These clouds are thin, wispy, and feathery. Image courtesy of the UCAR Digital Image Library Cirrus Clouds Cirrus clouds may appear even over some of the world's driest areas, such as the high Atacama Desert of northern Chile. Image courtesy of Caspar Ammann Cumulonimbus Clouds This cumulonimbus cloud has the characteristic anvil-shaped top. Image courtesy of the UCAR Digital Image Library Cumulonimbus Clouds This photograph of a cumulonimbus cloud was taken near Fort Lupton, Colorado. You can see some towers growing in this cloud. Image courtesy of Gregory Thompson Cumulonimbus Clouds This cumulonimbus cloud is well-developed and shows the characteristic anvil-shape. Image courtesy of Roberta Johnson Nimbostratus Clouds This image of nimbostratus clouds was taken in Seattle, WA. Notice the rain falling out of the clouds, as well as the rainbow! Image courtesy of Peggy LeMone Nimbostratus Clouds Nimbostratus clouds are dark gray with a ragged base. Image courtesy of English Wikipedia Nimbostratus Clouds This image of nimbostratus clouds was taken in Victoria, BC, Canada. Notice that you can t see the edges of the clouds. Image courtesy of the University of Victoria School-Based Weather Station Network Weather and Climate Think about cleaning your room. Are you the type who rushes and puts everything in piles, or do you slowly put everything back in its place all over the room? Which style of room cleaning would be like a Cumulus Cloud, and which one would be like a Stratus Cloud? Weather and Climate Fog: A stratus-like cloud that develops at ground level. Nimbus: A cloud that usually brings rain will have nimbus, meaning rain, in it's name. Weather and Climate Rain: Water droplets in clouds combine and become large and heavy enough to fall. Sleet: Raindrops freeze as they fall through a layer of cold air. Weather and Climate Hail: Frozen raindrops become coated with water, which then freezes This process then repeats. Snow: Water vapor condenses as ice crystals, not water droplets. Weather and Climate Thunderstorms: Occur when hot, humid air rises very quickly and cools. Bonus Thunderstorms are: - The most common type of severe weather - Thunderstorms are associated with dark Cumulonimbus clouds. BrainPop Weather and Climate Lightning: A bright, powerful flash of light caused by moving electric charges. How Lightning Strikes: When the negative charge in the cloud becomes great enough, it seeks an easy path to the positively charged ground below. The negative charge sends out a feeler, called a stepped leader, which is a series of invisible steps of negative charges. LiveScience.com Weather and Climate Thunder: Thunder is the sound of air rapidly expanding because of the huge and sudden temperature change from lightning. The air around a lightning bolt is superheated to about 54,000 degrees Fahrenheit (five times hotter than the sun!). This sudden heating causes the air to expand faster than the speed of sound, which compresses the air and forms a shock wave; we hear it as thunder. LiveScience.com Weather and Climate Thunderstorms often occur in the summer, when very warm air over the hot land rises quickly into much cooler air. Weather and Climate Tornado: A violent, spinning funnel of air that extends from the bottom of a thundercloud to the ground. BrainPop Weather and Climate Hurricane: A huge, powerful storm that produces extremely strong winds and heavy rain over a large area. It begins when a large body of air with very low pressure forms over tropical ocean water. The low-pressure area gains moisture and energy from the warm ocean waters. Winds increase in speed and being to blow in a circular pattern creating a tropical storm. When the winds reach 119kph the storm is classified as a hurricane. BrainPop
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