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A revised key to the Warneckea species of Cameroon, and description of Warneckea ngutiensis (Melastomataceae-Olisbeoideae), a new Critically Endangered rainforest shrub

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A revised key to the Warneckea species of Cameroon, and description of Warneckea ngutiensis (Melastomataceae-Olisbeoideae), a new Critically Endangered rainforest shrub
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  A revised key to the  Warneckea  species of Cameroon, and descriptionof  Warneckea ngutiensis  (Melastomataceae-Olisbeoideae), a newCritically Endangered rainforest shrub Robert Douglas Stone 1 & Martin Cheek 2 Summary.  Warneckea ngutiensis   R. D. Stone sp. nov. (Melastomataceae-Olisbeoideae) is described from near Ngutiin SW Region, Cameroon. Unique in section  Strychnoides   in having only a vestigial staminal oil gland, this rainforest shrub is Critically Endangered due to an oil palm plantation project. Key Words.  Banyang Mbo, conservation, Earthwatch, extinction, Herakles, oil palm plantation. Introduction The genus  Warneckea   Gilg is closely allied with and haspreviously beenunited withthegenus  Memecylon   L.,butisphylogeneticallydistinctandgenerallydistinguishedbyitsconspicuously 3-nerved leaf-blades (Stone 2006; Stone & Andreasen 2010). On-going studies have steadily in-creased the number of known species of   Warneckea  , withthe most recent additions to the genus for Cameroonbeing the range-restricted and threatened species W. austro-occidentalis   R. D. Stone and  W. mangrovensis  (Jacq.-Fél.) R. D. Stone (Stone  et al.  2009). With theseadditions there were 12 species of   Warneckea   recognisedby Onana (2011) as occurring in Cameroon.The present investigation concerns an unusual Warneckea   (represented by the specimen  Pollard   552)that was collected in November 2000 during a two-week botanical survey and training exercise in the forest onthe southern boundary of the then Banyang Mbo Wildlife Sanctuary, located near the town of Nguti inCameroon ’ s South-West Region. At the time of this  󿬁 eldsurvey, Banyang Mbo was co-managed by the WildlifeConservation Society (WCS) and the Ministry of Envi-ronment and Forest (MINEF). The survey was conduct-ed as part of the Earthwatch-Darwin Initiative supported “ Plant Diversity of western Cameroon ”  project led by botanists from Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and theNational Herbarium of Cameroon. The methodology used is detailed in Cheek & Cable (1997). Numerousherbarium specimens were collected with the intentionthat they would form the nucleus of data for a'Conservation Checklist' of Banyang Mbo, in the seriesthat began with Mt Cameroon (Cable & Cheek  1998)and continued with Kupe-Bakossi (Cheek   et al  . 2004),Bali-Ngemba (Harvey   et al  . 2004), Mefou (Cheek   et al. 2011) and Lebialem Highlands (Harvey   et al.  2010). Pollard   552 was later identi 󿬁 ed by one of us (RDS)as a member of the main section present in W-C Africa,  Warneckea   sect.  Strychnoides   (Engl.) Jacq.-Fél. exR. D. Stone (Stone & Andreasen 2010). However,uniquely in this group, among other features, theanther connectives of the Nguti taxon have only a vestigial oil gland, a feature generally important at thespecies-group or subgeneric level throughout thesubfamily Olisbeoideae. Accordingly, the species rep-resented by   Pollard   552 is here described as  Warneckea ngutiensis   sp. nov.The lowland evergreen forests of SW Cameroonhave proved to be rich in new species of plants, fromherbs, shrubs and lianas to canopy trees. Among thosepublished from the surveys discussed above, from theforests adjoining those at Nguti, mainly from theBakossi area immediately adjacent to the South, are: Coffea montekupensis   Stoff. (Stoffelen  et al.  1997),  Diospyros kupensis   Gosline (Gosline & Cheek  1998), Ancistrocladus grandifolius   Cheek (2000),  Ledermanniella onanae   Cheek (2003),  Memecylon kupeanum   R. D. Stone,Ghogue & Cheek and  M. bakossiense   R. D. Stone,Ghogue & Cheek (Stone  et al.  2008). To date, two new genera have also been discovered,  Kupea   Cheek & S. A. Williams (Cheek   et al.  2003) and  Korupodendron   Litt & Cheek  (2002). However, all of these taxa are threatened with extinction due to habitat clearance,mainly for agriculture (Onana & Cheek  2011). Effortsare now being made to delimit the highest priority areas in Cameroon for plant conservation as TropicalImportant Plant Areas (TIPAs) using the revised IPA criteria set out in Darbyshire  et al.  (2017). This isessential if more narrowly endemic species are not tobecome extinct in Cameroon as has  Oxygyne triandra  Schltr. (Cheek & Onana 2011). Accepted for publication 14 February 2018. 1 School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X01, Pietermaritzburg, 3209, South Africa. e-mail: StoneRD@ukzn.ac.za 2 Herbarium, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3AE, UK. KEW BULLETIN  (2018) 73:12 DOI 10.1007/S12225-018-9739-4ISSN: 0075-5974 (print)ISSN: 1874-933X (electronic) © The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2018  Revised key to the species of  Warneckea  in Cameroon 1. Leafbasesroundedandnarrowlycordateabovethepetiole;leaf-bladeswithprincipalnervesprominentonbothsurfaces; in 󿬂 orescences sessile or short-pedunculate; bracts persistent, imbricate-decussate;  󿬂 owers sessile orshort-pedicellate ( Warneckea   sect.  Guineenses   R. D. Stone) . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. mangrovensis  (  Jacq.-Fél  .)  R. D. Stone  Leaf bases either rounded, cordate or cuneate (not rounded  and  narrowly cordate); leaf-blades with principalnerves impressed on the upper surface, prominent on the lower; in 󿬂 orescences conspicuously pedunculate,in some cases with well-developed secondary axes (rarely contracted and subsessile); bracts ± rapidly deciduous;  󿬂 owers distinctly pedicellate (rarely subsessile); ( Warneckea   sect.  Strychnoides   (Engl.) Jacq.-Fél. ex R.D. Stone) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22. In 󿬂 orescences mainly below the leaves, fascicled at the swollen nodes of older branchlets (in  W. memecyloides  borne in the lower leaf axils and at recently defoliated nodes);  󿬂 owers distinctly pedicellate . . . . . . . . . . 3In 󿬂 orescences mainly in the leaf-axils (in  W. cinnamomoides   and  W. fosteri   also at the recently defoliated nodes); 󿬂 owers in some species short-pedicellate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73. Leaf-blades elliptic, 10  −  20 cm long × 4  −  9 cm wide, cuneate at base; in 󿬂 orescences subsessile or on peduncles2  −  7 mm long; fruits ± globose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4Leaf-blades broadly elliptic to ovate, obovate, oblanceolate or suborbicular, mostly 12  −  32 cm long × 7  −  12 cm wide, rounded to cordate or broadly cuneate at base; in 󿬂 orescences on peduncles 6  −  30 ( −  40) mm long;fruits ellipsoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54. Leaf-blades c. 10 cm long × 4 cm wide; in 󿬂 orescences densely fascicled, on peduncles 2  −  7 mmlong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. sapinii  sensu Jacques-Félix (1983), but not as to typeLeaf-blades up to 20 cm long × 9 cm wide; in 󿬂 orescences subsessile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. wildeana   Jacq.-Fél. 5. Leaf-blades ovate to broadly elliptic or suborbicular, 12  −  18 cm long × 7  −  10 cm wide, rounded to shallowly cordateat base; in 󿬂 orescences borne in the lower leaf axils and at recently defoliated nodes; peduncles 6  –  10 mm long;fruits 10 mm long × 6 mm wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. memecyloides  ( Benth. )  Jacq.-Fél. Leaf-blades larger, or if of similar dimensions then broadly cuneate to rounded at base (not cordate);in 󿬂 orescences fascicled at the swollen nodes of older branchlets; peduncles mostly c. 20  –  30 mm long; fruitsas above or larger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66. Leaf-blades± oblanceolate,20  – 32cmlong ×9 –  12 cm wide, narrowly cordate-auriculate atbase;petioles 2 – 4 mmlong; petals blue-violet; fruits 10 mm long × 8 mm wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. pulcherrima   ( Gilg  )  Jacq.-Fél. Leaf-blades broadly ovate to broadly elliptic or broadly obovate, 12  –  19 cm long × 7.5  –  10 cm wide, broadly cuneate to rounded at base; petioles 7  –  10 mm long; petals white; fruits 15  –  16 mm long × 10  –  11 mm wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. austro-occidentalis  R. D. Stone  7. Leaves apparently 1-nerved (the lateral pair of nerves submarginal, scarcely visible on the upper surface,forming a series of shallow arches from the base between the junctions with the transverse veins);in 󿬂 orescences sessile to subsessile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. bebaiensis  ( Gilg ex Engl. )  Jacq.-Fél. Leaves distinctly 3-nerved (the lateral pair of nerves clearly visible and percurrent from the base to the apex);in 󿬂 orescences as above or on peduncles to 10 mm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88. In 󿬂 orescences on peduncles 2  –  10 mm long, directly umbelliform or if branched then each secondary axis ±unbranched and 1 to 3- 󿬂 owered;  󿬂 owering pedicels slender, 4  –  10 mm long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9In 󿬂 orescences compact, borne on peduncles up to 6 mm long or subsessile and reduced to 1 to 3  󿬂 owers; 󿬂 owers ± sessile or on pedicels 1  –  4 mm long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119. Leaves subcoriaceous; in 󿬂 orescences axillary and sometimes terminal; fruits globose . .  W. jasminoides  ( Gilg  )  Jacq.-Fél. Leaves coriaceous; in 󿬂 orescences in the lower leaf-axils and at the recently defoliated nodes; fruits globose orellipsoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1010. Leaf-blades 8  −  14 cm long × 4  −  7 cm wide; fruits ellipsoid, 10 mm long × 6 mm wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. cinnamomoides  ( G. Don  )  Jacq.-Fél  .Leaf-blades 6  −  8 cm long × 3  −  4 cm wide; fruits globose, 6 × 6 mm . . . . . . . . .  W. fosteri  ( Hutch. & Dalziel  )  Jacq.-Fél. 11. Young branchlets robust, subquadrangular; leaf-blades 10  −  17 cm long × 5  −  8 cm wide; fruits globose, 10  –  15 mmin diameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. reygaertii  sensu Jacques-Félix (1983) Young branchlets acutely quadrangular to narrowly quadrangular-alate; leaf-blades 5  −  13.5 ( −  18)cmlong × 3  −  6.5( −  7) cm wide; fruits ellipsoid-oblong to ovoid or pyriform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1212. In 󿬂 orescences on peduncles 3  –  6 mm long, shortly branched, 5  –  7- 󿬂 owered, 1  –  1.5 cm long in total;  󿬂 owerson pedicels 1  –  2 mm long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. yangambensis  ( A. Fern. & R. Fern  .)  Jacq.-Fél. In 󿬂 orescences sessile or on peduncles to 2 mm long, unbranched, 1  –  3- 󿬂 owered, 0.5 cm long in total;  󿬂 owerssessile or on pedicels to 2 mm long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13  12 Page 2 of 6 KEW BULLETIN  (2018) 73:12 © The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2018  13. Anther connective gland conspicuous, elliptic in outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. membranifolia   ( Hook. f   .)  Jacq.-Fél.  Anther connective gland vestigial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  W. ngutiensis  R. D. Stone   Warneckea ngutiensis  R. D. Stone   sp. nov.  Type:Cameroon, South West Province, Nguti region,towards river Lowoa near edge of Banyang Mbo Wildlife Sanctuary, 5°20.23'N, 9°28.41'E, alt. 250m, forest understory,  󿬂 s. & fr., 28 Nov. 2000, Pollard   552 (holotype K [K000460176]; isotype YA).http://www.ipni.org/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:77175882-1  Evergreen understorey shrub   to 1.5 m tall. Branchletsslender, the youngest quadrangular in cross sectionand narrowly alate becoming terete with age; inter-nodes 3  –  4 ( –  4.7) cm long.  Leaves   on petioles 3.5  – 4 mm long, the petioles channelled on the adaxialside. Blades subcoriaceous, dark green and shining onthe upper surface, paler beneath, elliptic in outline,up to 13.5 cm long and 6.5 cm wide, base broadly cuneate, acuminate at apex, the acumen slender and1.5  –  2.5 cm long; midnerve and principal lateralnerves impressed on the upper surface, prominent onthe lower, the lateral nerves diverging from themidnerve at the base of the blade, curvilinear except near the leaf apex where forming weak archesbetween the junctions with the transverse veins;secondary lateral nerves 1 pair, much thinner thanthe principal laterals, intramarginal and weakly archedfor their entire length; transverse veins 8  –  12 pairs, of about the same thickness as the secondary laterals,somewhat prominent on the lower surface along withthe conspicuous network of smaller venules. In   󿬂  orescence   sessile, 3- 󿬂 owered, borne at the thickenednodes of older branches below the existing leaves;bracts and bracteoles 1  –  1.5 mm long, lance-ovate,cucullate.  Flowers   sessile or nearly so (if pedicelspresent then very short and concealed by thesubtending bracts and bracteoles); hypantho-calyxobconic, 2 × 2 mm, the margin spreading anddistinctly lobed, the lobes broadly triangular. Petals violet, narrowly spatulate  –  unguiculate, 2 mm long and 0.75  –  1 mm wide, at anthesis spreading to slightly recurved. Stamens well exserted on slender violet-coloured  󿬁 laments 4 mm long; anthers 1 mm long, theconnective yellow, ± straighttoslightlyincurved dorsally,the oil-gland vestigial and appearing as a dark discolouration between the middle and the extremity of the connective. Style slender, 5 mm long.  Fruit   dark purple at maturity, 8 mm long and 5 mm wide, crownedby the persistent calyx. Fig. 1. RECOGNITION . Differs from other species of   Warneckea  sect.  Strychnoides   by the combination of in 󿬂 orescencessessile,  󿬂 owering pedicels very short, and staminal oil-gland vestigial (not conspicuously present on thedorsal side of the anther connective). SPECIMENS EXAMINED .  CAMEROON . South West Prov-ince, Nguti region, towards river Lowoa near edge of Banyang Mbo Wildlife Sanctuary, 5°20.23'N,9°28.41'E, alt. 250 m, forest understory,  󿬂 s. & fr., 28Nov. 2000,  Pollard   552 (holotype K [K000460176];isotype YA). HABITAT  &   ECOLOGY . Lowland evergreen forest; 250 malt. CONSERVATION .  Warneckea ngutiensis   is assessed here asCritically Endangered CR B1 + B2ab(iii) + D using theIUCN (2012) criteria. This is because it is known froma single location just to the south of the formerBanyang Mbo Wildlife Sanctuary (since downrated inprotected status) near the town of Nguti. Many memecyloid species are both restricted in their rangeand infrequent within it (Cheek pp. 212  –  222 inOnana & Cheek  2011), and this is supposed by us tobe the case with  W. ngutiensis.  This is because, in 2 weeks ’  botanising by numerous botanists at thislocation in 2000, only one gathering was made of thisspecies. Further subsequent botanical surveys from thesame base near Nguti by botanists from the University of Rostok, Germany led by Prof. Stefan Porembski(pers. comm. to Cheek) and Prof. Bonaventure Sonkéof the École Normale Supérieure, University of  Yaoundé (pers. comm. to Cheek) have similarly not produced any additional records of the species so faras is known.The only known site for  Warneckea ngutiensis   is withinthe boundary of the area proposed as an oil palmplantation by the U.S.A.-based company, Herakles(http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/wp-content/uploads/l e g a c y / G l o b a l / u s a / p l a n e t 3 / P D F s /HeraklesCrimeFile.pdf ., and https://www.google.co.uk/?gfe_rd=cr&ei=JaTuVdz2FYnj8weqyIKIBQ&gws_rd=ssl#-q=herakles+oil+palm+plantation,+cameroon bothdownloaded 8 Sept. 2015). Although this operation wasreported as suspended in 2013 (http:// www.greenpeace.org/international/en/news/Blogs/makingwaves/herakles-cameroon-palm-oil-project-starts-to-/blog/45259/ downloaded 9 Sept. 2015), there areconcernsthatitwillberesurrectedinthenearfuturesinceHerakles has continued its activities on the ground(https://www.grain.org/article/entries/5037-communi-ties-lose-out-to-oil-palm-plantations, downloaded 9Sept. 2015). Therefore, there is every chance that allknownindividualsofthespecieswillbecome extinctwhenclearing proceeds for the establishment of the plantation.It is perfectly possible that the species also extends to the Page 3 of 6  12 KEW BULLETIN  (2018) 73:12 © The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2018  Fig. 1.  Warneckea ngutiensis.  A  habit,  󿬂 owering branch;  B  detail of stem apex, leaf base and internode;  C  transverse section of stemshowingfourwings — from B ; D in 󿬂 orescence,showingbractsandbracteoles; E single 󿬂 ower,detailof D ; F 󿬂 owercutopenlongitudinallyand 󿬂 attenedtoshowinsertionof 󿬁 lamentsandpetals; G bract,adaxialsurface,showingcolleters-hairs; H petals; J – L antherwithexpandedconnective, oil gland absent,  J  outer surface,  K  inner surface,  L  side view;  M  fruit. All from  Pollard   552.  DRAWN BY ANDREW BROWN .  12 Page 4 of 6 KEW BULLETIN  (2018) 73:12 © The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2018  north into the Banyang Mbo reserve where it might havethe prospect of protection. Yet equally it might extendsouth and west of Nguti into the main part of the areadesignated for plantation by Herakles. This area remainsrelatively unsurveyed for plants, although it occurs withinthe area of Tropical Africa with the highest density of wildplant species, which occurs in SW Region Cameroon(Cheek   et al  . 2001).Even if a broad buffer area were created outsidethe boundary of Banyang Mbo, there is a risk that farmers displaced by the future plantation project willtake up land within it and so threaten the only knownlocality of   Warneckea ngutiensis.  For these reasons weconsider the only known location for  Warneckea ngutiensis   to be highly threatened, and the extent of occurrence and area of occupancy of the species to be4 km 2 , adopting the preferred IUCN (2012) 4 km 2 grid cell. Warneckea ngutiensis   is also threatened because of the low number of individuals recorded: no more than 󿬁  ve were thought to have been seen by Pollard (pers.comm. to Cheek). In the  Red Data Book of the Plants of  Cameroon   (Onana & Cheek  2011),  ‘ Warneckea ngutiensis  ined. ’  was  󿬁 rst mentioned and considered to beCritically Endangered. However, since it had not beenpublished, its threatened status could not be acceptedby IUCN at that time. ETYMOLOGY . Named for the town of Nguti, the closest settlement to the type location. Discussion Warneckea ngutiensis   evidently belongs in  W.  sect. Strychnoides  , a monophyletic group of c. 24 speciesdistributed in Guinean-Congolian Africa (Stone & Andreasen 2010). Amongst the species of this section,the in 󿬂 orescence dimensions are quite variable, as arethe size and position of the anther gland. On the onehand there is a group of closely related species withlong peduncles and distinctly pedicellate  󿬂 owers, e.g. W. pulcherrima  ,  W. austro-occidentalis   and  W. bequaertii  (De Wild.) Jacq.-Fél. On the other hand there areseveral species with in 󿬂 orescences sessile or subsessileand with  󿬂 owering pedicels also very short, e.g. W. membranifolia  ,  W. reygaertii  ,  W. yangambensis  , and W. gilletii   (De Wild.) Jacq.-Fél. In terms of the anther-gland, there are several species in sect.  Strychnoides   with the gland occupying   1 = 3  to  2 = 3  the length of theconnective, while in other species it is positioned nearthe extremity of the connective, or even reduced andpunctiform e.g.  W. sapinii   (De Wild. ) Jacq.-Fél. as perthe description in  Fl. Cameroun   (Jacques-Félix 1983). Within  Warneckea   sect.  Strychnoides  , the new species W. ngutiensis   seems closest to the above-mentionedgroup of four species with sessile or subsessilein 󿬂 orescences and  󿬂 owers. Of these there is only one species,  W. membranifolia  , in which both thein 󿬂 orescences and  󿬂 owers can be fully subsessile asin  W. ngutiensis  .  Warneckea membranifolia   is widespreadand common in intact evergreen forest in Cameroon,but is clearly distinguished by having anthers with aconspicuous oil-gland (vs gland vestigial and incon-spicuous in  W. ngutiensis  ). Acknowledgements The authors are grateful to the National Herbarium of Cameroon-IRAD-MINRESI for permission to collect specimens in Cameroon, to WCS Cameroon foraccommodation in the Banyang Mbo Research Sta-tion, and to Earthwatch Europe for supporting thesurvey by sponsoring costs of the participants. TheDarwin Initiative also supported elements of thissurvey. Janis Shillito typed the manuscript. Twoanonymous reviewers are thanked for comments onan earlier version of the manuscript. References Cable, S. & Cheek, M. (1998).  The Plants of Mt Cameroon  .  A Conservation Checklist  . Royal BotanicGardens, Kew.Cheek, M. (2000). A synoptic revision of   Ancistrocladus  (Ancistrocladaceae) in Africa, with a new speciesfrom western Cameroon.  Kew Bull.  55: 871  –  882.____ (2003). A new species of   Ledermanniella (Podostemaceae  ) from western Cameroon.  Kew Bull. 58: 733  –  737.____&Cable,S.(1997).PlantInventoryforconservationmanagement: the Kew-Earthwatch programme in Western Cameroon, 1993  –  96. In: S. Doolan (ed.), African Rainforests and the Conservation of Biodiversity  ,pp. 29  –  38. Earthwatch Europe, Oxford.____, Pollard, B. J., Darbyshire, I., Onana, J.-M. & Wild, C. (2004).  The plants of Kupe, Mwanenguba and the Bakossi Mountains, Cameroon. A Conservation Checklist  . Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.____, Harvey, Y. & Onana, J.-M. (2011).  The Plants of  Mefou Proposed National Park, Yaoundé, Cameroon. A Conservation Checklist  . Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.____, Mackinder, B., Gosline, G., Onana, J.-M. & Achoundong, G. (2001). The phytogeography and 󿬂 oraofwesternCameroonandtheCrossRiver-SanagaRiver interval.  Syst. & Geogr. Pl.  71: 1097  –  1100.____, Williams, S. & Etuge, M. (2003).  Kupea martinetugei,  a new genus and species of   Triuridaceae  from western Cameroon.  Kew Bull  . 58: 225  –  228.____ & Onana, J.-M. (2011).  Red Data Species in Cameroon, a Guide for Secondary School Teachers  . RoyalBotanic Gardens, Kew.Darbyshire, I., Anderson, S., Asatryan, A., By  󿬁 eld, A.,Cheek, M., Clubbe, C., Ghrabi, Z., Harris, T.,Heatubun, C. D., Kalema, J., Magassouba, S.,McCarthy, B., Milliken, W., de Montmollin, B., Nic Page 5 of 6  12 KEW BULLETIN  (2018) 73:12 © The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2018
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