Essays & Theses

A Sketch Through the History of Modern Protestant Missions

Description
LIBERTY BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY A SKETCH THROUGH THE HISTORY OF MODERN PROTESTANT MISSIONS A PAPER SUBMITTED TO DR. KEVIN KING IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE COURSE CHHI 525 BY JUSTIN OWENS LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 Table of Contents Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………. 1 Pietists and the Moravian Missions Movement………………………………………………….. 1 William Carey‟s Influence on Modern Missions………………………………………………… 4 J. Hudson Taylor and His Role in
Published
of 17
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
   L IBERTY B APTIST T HEOLOGICAL S EMINARY  A   S KETCH THROUGH THE H ISTORY OF M ODERN P ROTESTANT M ISSIONS  A PAPER SUBMITTED TO D R  .   K  EVIN K  ING  I  N PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE R  EQUIREMENTS FOR    THE COURSE CHHI   525B Y  J USTIN O WENS  L YNCHBURG ,   V IRGINIA  T HURSDAY ,   O CTOBER  14,   2010  Table of Contents Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………. 1Pietists and t he Moravian Missions Movement………………………………………………….. 1 William Carey‟s Influence on Modern Missions………………………………………………… 4J. Hudson Taylor and His Role in Moder  n Missions……………………………………………... 7Mission Societies and their I mpact……………………………………………………………… 10 Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………………. 12 Bibliography…………………………………………………………………………………….. 14  1 Introduction Missions, in some form, has been going on since the time of Christ. From the firstapostles, to the missionaries in the Middle Ages and then into the modern and postmodern ages,missions has never ceased. Protestant missions, however, received a big boost in the lateeighteenth and early nineteenth centuries with the advent of the modern missions movement.This paper sketches the history of modern Protestant missions beginning with a look at thePietists and Moravians, then examines the lives and careers of William Carey and J. HudsonTaylor. This paper also argues for the use of mission societies that played such an integral rolein modern missions. Pietists and The Moravian Missions Movement The Moravians were a group of people that srcinated out of Bohemia (or modern CzechRepublic) from the teachings of John Huss in the fifteenth century. Throughout the centuries,they endured in one way or another in staying alive as a Protestant denomination. TheMoravians had a great zeal for missions. The modern mission movement among the Moraviansgrew out of the Pietist movement in Germany in the early eighteenth century. Pietism gainedmomentum in Europe under Philipp Jakob Spener in the late seventeenth to early eighteenthcenturies. Spener began Bible studies and emphasized personal piety among his followers. Oneof his greatest followers was August Hermann Francke. Francke was a professor at the University of Halle in Germany and, like Spener before him, “he also paid more attention to the relationship between Pietism and traditiona l Lutheran theology.” 1   Gonzalez also notes that, “At first the Pietists were not interested in world missions, although they were active in meeting the needs of their fellow Christians by founding schools 1 Justo L. Gonzalez, The Reformation to the Present Day , vol. 2 of  The Story of Christianity (New York, NY: HarperOne, 1985), 207.  2and institutions to serve orphans, the poor, and o thers in need.” 2 The king of Denmark, in 1707,decided to send missionaries to his Indian colonies and requested that Francke recommend andsend two men. Of the two, Bartholomäeus Ziegenbalg is argued by Paul Jenkins in his review of Daniel Jeyaraj ‟s  Bartholomäus Ziegenbalg, the Father of Modern Protestant Mission: An Indian Assessment    to be the “father of modern missions” as opposed to William Carey.Jenkins includes in his review Jeyaraj‟s statement that “the key foundation date in the development of modern Protestan t missions was 1706 (Ziegenbalg‟ s arrival in South India) rather than 1792 (the year William Carey‟s Baptist Missionary Society was founded).” 3 A. Scott Moreau, Gary R. Corwin, and Gary B. McGee further develop Ziegenbalg‟s career by stati ng that he “became fluent in the Tamil language and translated a large part of the Old Testamentand the entire New Testament.” 4   Though Ziegenbalg‟s ministry seems to be very similar to thatof Carey‟s, calling him the “father of modern Protestant missions” seems to go a bit far. Thoughhe was sent and served as a missionary before William Carey did, Carey‟s influence on modern missions did more to change the minds of people than Ziegenbalg.The Moravian missions movement gained its greatest zeal and drive from the group of Moravian refugees who took refuge with Count Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf. The group of refugees founded a village at Herrnhut and soon Zinzendorf joined them. Gonzalez tells of the rise of Zinzendorf‟s missionary zeal. He notes th at “in 1731, while in Denmark, Zinzendorf  meta group of Eskimos who had been converted by the Lutheran missionary Hans Egede, and 2 Gonzalez, 208. 3 Paul Jenkins, “Bartholomäus Ziegenbalg, The Father of Modern Protestant Mission: an IndianAssessment ” in  International Bulletin of Missionary Research 31, no. 4 (October 1, 2007), 217. 4 A. Scott Moreau, Gary R. Corwin, and Gary B. McGee,  Introducing World Missions , (Grand Rapids:Baker Academic, 2004), 123.

FDI-in-India - DK

Nov 18, 2017

dev_guide

Nov 18, 2017
Search
Tags
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks