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A trumpet isn

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A trumpet isn’t just for Christmas… It is strange how many musicians, even leading ones, come from homes without music. Out of the blue ,Hakan Hardenberger, the only son of totally unmusical parents in a country district of southern Sweden,has at the age of 30 established himself as unique among the world’s trumper-players today. 15Recently in one of the London’s premier concert halls he played the Hummel Trumpet Concerto, something of a party-piece for him, while on television a whole feature w
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  A trumpet isn’t just for Christmas …It is strange how many musicians, even leading ones, come from homes withoutmusic. Out of the blue ,Hakan Hardenberger, the only son of totally unmusical parents ina country district of southern Sweden,has at the age of 30 established himself as uniqueamong the world’s trumper-players today.15-Recently in one of the London’s premier concert halls he played the HummelTrumpet Concerto, something of a party-piece for him, while on television a wholefeature was devoted to his world and development, filmed both here and in Sweden.Born near Malmo, he owes his career to the accident of a Christmas present whenhe was only eight.16-The success of the gift was instant. The boy never stopped playing. His mother managed to contact the second trumpet-player in the Malmo Symphony Orchestra, whomshe persuaded to give her son lessons.17-There the mature Hardenberger has to draw a line between himself and histeacher. ”The trumpet is so primitive an instrument. ”he explains ,”that you can’t build atrumpet that is acoustically perfect. Whatever you do, it will have imperfections. Besides,you can’t find two mouthpieces exactly the same .To me it is a matter of getting to knowthe imperfections and making a relationship with them.”18-And unlike the great British contender among virtuoso trumpet-player, John Wallace,who developed srcinally from a brass-band background and then through working inorchestras, Hardenberger has always thought of himself as a solo artist pure and simple.19-His parents gave him every chance to practice, and went along with his ambitionto make trumpet-playing career. It was then a question of where, at 15,he should be sentto study .America, Bo Nilsson’s first choice, was thought to be too far away and toodangerous, which meant that he went instead at the age of 16 to study in Paris with PierreThibaud. Thibaud confirmed his prejudice against going into an orchestra, saying that“Playing in the orchestra is like digging in the garden”.20-  Thibaud suggested that he should enter the competition” just for experience”.Hardenberger learned the pieces for the first round only ,but he won through to thesecond. Luckily he already knew most of the pieces in that round too, but on gettingthrough to the final he was faced with a concerto that had already daunted him. He didn’twin first prize that time, but he enjoyed the performance, realizing that though he” playedlike a pig”, people did listen to him.Quoted like that, Hardenberger’s realism about his work and his career may soundarrogant, but that would be a totally false impression. Thoughtfully he refuses to try andanalyse what such a gift of communication might consist of, as” You risk destroying it intrying to explain. The power of the music lies in the fact that it can always move people”A. From the very start Hardenberger seems to have had the gift of finding the rightcompromise and making that relationship. Without any sense of boasting, heexplains that even in his boyhood years the characteristic Hardenberger soundwas already recognizable ,”the first thing I acquired”B. He is always anxious to extend his repertory. Hans-Werner Henze is the latestcomposer to be writing a piece for him, while on other records he has unearthedrare works from the 17 th and 18tn centuries.C. He was objective enough about himself to know that he played the trumpet better than others of his age ,but it was only at the end of the first competition heentered, at the age of 17 during his first year in Paris, that he came to realize thatin addition he had a particular gift of communicating.D. His father, unmusical but liking Louis Armstrong’s playing, had the idea of givinghis only son a trumpet. Being a serious man, he didn’t pick a toy trumpet, but took advice and bought a genuine grown-up instrument.E. His record are continually opening up new repertory, not just concertos by long-neglected composers of the baroque and classical periods, but new words too.When you meet him, bright-eyed and good-looking, he seems even younger thanhis years, as fresh and open in his manner as the sound of the trumpet.F. Bo Nilsson was an up-and-coming musician, and at once spotted natural talent.Hardenberger consistently blesses his luck to have got such a teacher right fromthe start, one who himself so obsessed with the trumpet and trumpet-playing thathe would search out and contact players all over the world, and as a “trumpetfanatic” was “always looking for another mouthpiece”.G. From early boyhood he had as a role-model the French trumpeter, Maurice Andre,another player who bypassed the orchestra. The boy bought all his records, andidolized him. Time: 20 minutes
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