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Arg Prompt #1 ELA Period 6

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Argument stating that real friendships cannot be had online
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   Sam Houle 10/20 Period 6 Argumentative Prompt #1 The idyllic concept of a virtual reality impels us to believe the differences between the computerized realm and the other, are non-existent. All three passages seemingly dictate the sense that the internet can only bring social ties, but none that are officially considered “real” friendships, as there are many factors that accompany this type of relationship that the keys on a laptop cannot suffice. In some variant cases, closer bonds can manifest while on social networks, similar to those in the real world, although Source 3 specializes the idea that if there is a trade-off  between online friends and offline companionships, it never is truly advantageous. To put it simply, the contrasting ideologies between the articles display the notion that socialization does not always present itself through an emotional camaraderie, which Source 1 fails to prove. The question isolates the inquiry on whether or not real friendships can be made, not if a heightened level of mingling can be achieved through a social network. The second article gives a personal experience wherein they show they once had 20 calls per day before the advent of Facebook, but states they now receive 3 at most. The blogger expresses that overall, the fact that the “number of people ringing our doorbell through some mechanism has ballooned like Charles Barkley”, means these “conversations” are no longer genuine.  The author of the second passage questions the notable premise that “interacting with more people is inherently better than interacting with fewer people”, due to the realization that  people who are “met” online from his perspective cannot have the deeper connection that real friendships entail. In the real world, those who already have true social ties with another person shows they also have, at least, a general idea of the person’s background, meaning an actual reason to care about his family or the “inanities of the everyday”, as the blogger states.  He   Sam Houle 10/20 Period 6 understands why Google + has begun to overtake other networks such as Facebook or Twitter, as it allows the users to find more “friends” who “care” about their random online postings.  The wi-fi powered universe so much of the world has plugged into has transformed into an infinite medium of anonymity, that is, if the user so chooses to base their online personality off of a concealed persona, despite having their very own anatomy, which is completely absent of technology. Sally Arthur shows us that while we may not be able to truly acquire “friends” online, the internet allows the web- surfer to “practice social skills in an anonymous setting”, which outwardly progress the population in manners they would not generally be able to encounter. That being said, it can become a disadvantage to a real social setting if it begins to offset real-world situations. In essence, a real friend is one who can share an emotional connection with the other  person. These sources expand on this opinion through the ideology that the internet, while technologically connected to a virtual mainframe, disconnects us from reality. The third article  phrases this through its use of the sentence “friends who exist only on a computer screen d o not  provide the companionship necessary to sustain friendships”,  to indicate that humans must see eye to eye, not eye to an LED projection.

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Jul 22, 2017

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Jul 22, 2017
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