Documents

CH 15-110 Heat Stress Mgmt JUL14rev0914.pdf

Description
ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL Policy & Procedure This is a CONTROLLED document for internal use only. Any documents appearing in paper form are not controlled and should be checked against the electronic file version prior to use. TITLE: Heat Stress Management Program NUMBER: CH 15-110 Effective Date: July 21, 2014 Page 1 of 20 Applies To: All TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Policy …………………………………………………………………………………. 2 Definitions ……………………………………………………………………
Categories
Published
of 20
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
    ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL Policy & Procedure This is a CONTROLLED document for internal use only. Any documents appearing in paper form are not controlled and should be checked against the electronic file version prior to use. TITLE: Heat Stress Management Program NUMBER: CH 15-110 Effective Date: July 21, 2014 Page 1 of 20  Applies To: All TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Policy   ………………………………………………………………………………….  2 Definitions   ……………………………………………………………………………  2 Guiding Principles and Values   ……………………………………………………  3 Procedure Responsibilities   ……………………………………………………………….  5 Implementation   ………………………………………………………………..  6 References   ……………………………………………………………………………  7 Related Documents   …………………………………………………………………  7  Appendices Appendix A  Flow Diagram for the Evaluation of Heat Stress Concerns 8 Appendix B  The Humidex Based Response Plan ……………………….  12 Appendix C  Consideration of Clothing Requirements …………………..  14 Appendix D  Screening Criteria …………………………………………….  15 Appendix E  Calculation of Work Demand ………………………………..  17 Appendix F  Physiological Monitoring ……………………………………..   19 Appendix G  Control Measures to Prevent Heat Accumulation ………….  20  Heat Stress Management Page 2 of 20 CH 15-110 (return to Table of Contents)   This is a CONTROLLED document for internal use only. Any documents appearing in paper form are not controlled and should be checked against the electronic file version prior to use. POLICY 1. In promoting a healthy workplace and complying with legislation, Capital Health recognizes the need for a Heat Stress Management Program to provide guidance and direction to staff for the management of heat stress. 2. The Heat Stress Management Program includes: 2.1. Task assessment 2.2. Humidex measurements 2.3. Wet bulb globe temperature measurements (where required) 2.4. Staff education 2.5. Implementation of control measures 3. In areas with no air conditioning, water will be provided to employees during the period of June to early September. (Refer to Memo to Managers regarding the process for the provision of water.) 4. Given the variability between individual responses to elevated temperatures, education will be provided to enable staff recognition of signs and symptoms of heat stress, factors that influence ability to dissipate heat, self-monitoring and increased consumption of water. This applies to all areas and will be done via the LMS system. 5. The Heat Stress Management Program applies to: 5.1. A staff member who is or may be exposed to conditions which could cause heat stress, 5.2. conditions which could result in a staff member’s  core body temperature exceeding 38°C (100°F), or 5.3. conditions which are in excess of the screening criteria values for heat stress exposure in the heat stress and strain section of the  American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists  (ACGIH) Standard for unacclimatized workers. 6. As required by the Occupational Health Regulations (Refer to  Reference #1 ) the heat stress guidelines and exposure criteria found in the latest revision of the ACGIH Standard ( Reference #2 ) are to be used for the evaluation and control of heat stress. 7. In addition to meeting the requirements of the NS Occupational Health Regulations, a Humidex based response plan will be followed to allow a more rapid reaction to staff concerns. 8. An individual department may set lower limits than listed here if determining there is a significant risk to patient or staff health, based on specific tasks and/or protective equipment worn. DEFINITIONS Acclimatized Staff:  A staff member is considered to be acclimatized if they have been exposed for a period of 5 of the last 7 days to  Heat Stress Management Page 3 of 20 CH 15-110 (return to Table of Contents)   This is a CONTROLLED document for internal use only. Any documents appearing in paper form are not controlled and should be checked against the electronic file version prior to use. heat  – stress conditions that are similar to those expected for the work. When the exposure is discontinued, the staff member’s  acclimatization begins to decline with a noticeable loss within 4 days Staff:  Any employee, physician, other practitioner, volunteer, student, contractor, or associate of Capital Health or an employee of a Capital Health Foundation Heat Stress:  The net heat load to which a staff member can be exposed from the combination of workload, environmental factors (air temperature, humidity, radiant heat and air movement) and clothing requirements. Heat Strain:  Overall physiological response to heat stress, for the dissipation of excess heat from the body. Humidex:  A value combining the air temperature and the relative humidity into one number, used to indicate how hot weather feels to the average person. Hygrometer  A device used to measure ambient temperature and percent relative humidity. Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee  ( JOHSC):  A committee established under Nova Scotia Occupational Health and Safety Act with established Terms of Reference. Percent Relative Humidity (%R.H.): The moisture content of air expressed as a percentage of the maximum it can hold at a given temperature; the optimum %RH is 30 to 60% Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT):  An index used to   quantify the level of heat stress on staff from the combined effects of air temperature, relative humidity and radiant heat. The ACGIH work-rest regimen is based on WBGT values. Work Place Safety Team WPST:  A team established by the JOHSC as a sub-committee with established Terms of Reference. GUIDING PRINCIPLES AND VALUES 1. Working in hot conditions can result in a number of adverse health effects, ranging from discomfort to serious illnesses, typically referred to as heat stress . For most staff of  Heat Stress Management Page 4 of 20 CH 15-110 (return to Table of Contents)   This is a CONTROLLED document for internal use only. Any documents appearing in paper form are not controlled and should be checked against the electronic file version prior to use. Capital Health, the potential risk of heat stress is restricted to the summer months when environmental temperatures can be elevated and accompanied by high humidity. 2. Staff may be exposed to heat stress when working in any, or a combination of, the following conditions: 2.1. outdoor work during summer months; 2.2. occupations where there are processes which generate radiant heat, such as in laundry or kitchen areas; 2.3. activities that require the use of protective clothing, such as the administration of chemotherapy drugs; and 2.4. hot, stuffy, and poorly ventilated buildings. 2.5. areas normally air conditioned where the systems are not functioning correctly 3. The ACGIH (2013) states that staff should not be permitted to work when their deep body temperature exceeds 38°C (100.4°F). When an individual can not effectively dissipate internal heat, the possible health effects, in order of increasing seriousness, are: 3.1. heat fatigue 3.2. heat rash, 3.3. fainting (heat syncope) 3.4. heat cramps 3.5. heat exhaustion 3.6. heat stroke Refer to  Appendix B  for signs and symptoms of heat stress disorders. 4.  Four environmental factors affect the amount of stress of a staff member in a hot work area (See  Appendix D ): 4.1. temperature 4.2. humidity 4.3. radiant heat 4.4. air velocity. Using engineering controls, administrative controls and personal protective equipment (refer to  I ), the impact of environmental factors and the risk of heat stress can be reduced. 5. The level of individual stress is also affected by personal characteristics such as: 5.1. age 5.2. weight 5.3. fitness
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks