Abstract

Genetic diversity of invasive species in the Great Lakes versus their Eurasian source populations: insights for risk analysis

Description
Combining DNA variation data and risk assessment procedures offers important diagnostic and monitoring tools for evaluating the relative success of exotic species invasions. Risk assessment may allow us to understand how the numbers of founding
Categories
Published
of 18
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Transcript
  Risk Analysis, Vol. 25, No. 4, 2005 DOI: 10.1111/j.1539-6924.2005.00655.x Genetic Diversity of Invasive Species in the Great LakesVersus Their Eurasian Source Populations: Insightsfor Risk Analysis Carol A. Stepien, 1 ∗ Joshua E. Brown, 1 Matthew E. Neilson, 1 and Mark A. Tumeo 2 Combining DNA variation data and risk assessment procedures offers important diagnos-tic and monitoring tools for evaluating the relative success of exotic species invasions. Riskassessmentmayallowustounderstandhowthenumbersoffoundingindividuals,geneticvari-ants, population sources, and introduction events affect successful establishment and spread.This is particularly important in habitats that are “hotbeds” for invasive species—such as theNorth American Great Lakes. This study compares genetic variability and its application torisk assessment within and among three Eurasian groups and five species that successfully in-vaded the Great Lakes during the mid 1980s through early 1990s; including zebra and quaggamussels, round and tubenose gobies, and the ruffe. DNA sequences are compared from exoticand native populations in order to evaluate the role of genetic diversity in invasions. Closerelatives are also examined, since they often invade in concert and several are saline tolerantand are likely to spread to North American estuaries. Results show that very high geneticdiversity characterizes the invasions of all five species, indicating that they were founded byvery large numbers of propagules and underwent no founder effects. Genetic evidence pointsto multiple invasion sources for both dreissenid and goby species, which appears related to es-pecially rapid spread and widespread colonization success in a variety of habitats. In contrast,results show that the ruffe population in the Great Lakes srcinated from a single foundingpopulation source from the Elbe River drainage. Both the Great Lakes and the Elbe Riverpopulations of ruffe have similar genetic diversity levels—showing no founder effect, as inthe other invasive species. In conclusion, high genetic variability, large numbers of founders,and multiple founding sources likely significantly contribute to the risk of an exotic speciesintroduction’s success and persistence. KEYWORDS: Foundereffect;GreatLakes;nonindigenousspecies;populationgenetics;riskassessment 1 Lake Erie Center and Department of Earth, Ecological andEnvironmentalSciences,TheUniversityofToledo,6200BayshoreRoad, Toledo, OH 43618, USA. 2 Center for Environmental Science, Technology and Policy andOffice of Sponsored Programs and Research, Cleveland StateUniversity, 2121 Euclid Avenue KB 1150, Cleveland, OH 44115-2214, USA. ∗ Address correspondence to Carol A. Stepien, Lake Erie Centerand Department of Earth, Ecological, and Environmental Sci-ences, The University of Toledo, 6200 Bayshore Road, Toledo,OH 43618, USA; carol.stepien@utoledo.edu. 1. INTRODUCTION The genetic character of a nonindigenous speciesintroductionisregardedasfundamentaltoitsinvasivesuccess (1–5) and provides important data for compar-ative environmental risk assessment. There are threebasic components to the use of genetic informationas part of a risk assessment involving invasive popu-lations. The first component involves estimating theprobability of critical events that are likely to lead tothe success of invasive populations. Pertinent genetic 1043 0272-4332/05/0100-1043$22.00/1 C  2005 Society for Risk Analysis  1044 Stepien et al. data that may assist in this estimation include thelevelofgeneticvariability,thegenotypiccomposition,number of individuals and genotypes introduced, andnumber and variety of founding sources. These fac-torsarethefocusofthepresentstudy.Oncetheprob-abilitiesoftheunderlying“riskevents”areidentified,to complete a risk assessment, it is necessary to: (1)estimate the probability of those events; and (2) eval-uate the impacts or consequences, in terms of losses(to the native ecosystem, other species, and the envi-ronment) given the likelihood of the event (i.e., theestablishment,spread,andpersistenceoftheinvasivepopulation). The combination of the probability of the event and the consequential damage should theevent occur is a measure of the “risk” and, if donequantitatively, can provide actual probabilities. Theresults of such a risk assessment, even if only quali-tative, are extremely valuable in risk management toanalyzeprotectiveactionsthatcouldbeimplemented,in this case, to prevent the occurrence, establishment,and/or spread of an invasion. 1.1. Genetic Analysis of Exotic Speciesin the Great Lakes TheNorthAmericanGreatLakeshavebeeneco-logically restructured by waves of invaders that wereaccidentallyintroducedfromships’ballastwater,withseveral high-impact introductions clustering duringthemid1980stoearly1990s—includingthedreissenidmussel, neogobiin gobies, and ruffe invasions exam-ined here. The Great Lakes have been a “hotbed”for invasive species—presumably due to high ship-ping traffic, a history of pollution and ecologicaldisturbance,thepresenceofopennichesinanecolog-icallyyoungsystemdatingtothePleistoceneIceAges,facilitativeinteractionsbyco-evolvedinvaders—suchas the predator-prey relationship between the dreis-senids and the round goby—and a donor–recipientpathway from the Ponto-Caspian region . (1 , 6–8) In this study, we compare the population geneticand systematic relationships of five exotic speciesinvasions in the Great Lakes, including: (1) dreis-senid mussels—the zebra mussel Dreissena polymor- pha andthequaggamussel D.bugensis ,(2)neogobiinfishes—the round goby Apollonia (formerly Neogob-ius ) melanostomus and the freshwater tubenose goby Proterorhinus semilunaris (name changed with divi-sion from the marine tubenose goby P. marmoratus per Stepien and Tumeo (9) and Neilson and Stepien(in progress)), and (3) the ruffe percid fish Gymno-cephaluscernuus .Alltheseinvasionsoccurredduringthe mid 1980s to early 1990s from Eurasian sourcepopulationshavingphylogeneticspeciessrcinsinthePonto-Caspian region. (1 , 9–12) All have been success-ful at establishment and spread, with D. polymorpha and A. melanostomus being the most widespread andnumerous. Conventional genetic theory (2 , 13) predictsthat founding populations, such as these, would havemarkedly lower genetic variability than contained inthe source populations, due to few genotypes beingintroduced—comprising a central hypothesis surmis-inga“foundereffect”thatiscriticallyexaminedhere.Weanalyzeacommonsuiteofgeneticcharactersthatmay characterize and/or differentiate these five inva-sionsandexploretheirapplicationtoriskassessment. 1.2. Genetic Characteristics of Exotic Invasions Ecological analyses reveal that successful exoticspecies often display a broad range of environmentaltolerance, such as to a variety of salinity and tem-perate regimes, possess a history of invasiveness inother areas, and grow and reproduce rapidly. (14) Alarge number of introduced individuals and high ge-netic variability are predicted to increase the risk of establishment, spread, and adaptation to new habi-tats (1 , 2 , 15 , 16) —hypotheses that are critically examinedhere. Similarly, temporal and spatial waves of intro-ductions srcinating from multiple founding sourcesmay fuel the genetic diversity of an invasion, enhanc-ing its ability to adapt to new and changing environ-ments. Ballast water may be exchanged by ships ina variety of ports, mixing the gene pools of differentfounding sources, and introducing a unique combina-tion of genotypes to new areas.However, it is likely that most invasions arefounded by very small populations having limitedgenepoolsduetothedifficultyofsurvivingtransport,encounteringfavorableenvironmentalconditions,se-curing habitat and resources, surviving the stress of new competitors and predators, finding a mate, andsuccessfully reproducing. Typically, new populationsthus would be likely to show marked founder effects(low genetic variability compared to source popu-lation areas)—a central hypothesis examined in thepresent study by comparing the genetic charactersanddiversityofexoticversusnativepopulations.Lowgenetic variability in new populations from foundereffects would be especially apparent in the mitochon-drialDNAgenomeduetoitssmallereffectivepopula-tionsize,morerapidextinctionoflineages,andlackof recombination. (17) Here,weanalyzeresultsfromboth  Invasive Species Genetics 1045 mtDNA and nuclear DNA analyses in a comparativeapproachanddiscusstheirrelationtoriskassessment. 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS Species examined, samples, sampling site coordi-nates,andtypesofgeneticdataanalyzedareindicatedin Table I, with North American and Eurasian sam-plinglocationsshownonthemapsinFigs.1and2.Thepresent study focuses on comparing levels of geneticvariationwithinandamongfiveinvasivespeciesintheGreat Lakes versus their native and invasive popula-tionsinEurasia,andispartoflargerongoingseparateanalyses of the extent of variation within each speciesbyourGreatLakesGeneticsLaboratory.Previousre-sults for the five species (dreissenids; (1 , 11 , 12) neogobi-ins; (9 , 18) and ruffe (10 , 19) ) here are compared with newgenetic databases for each, offering increased resolu-tion power for understanding the role of genetic vari-ation in invasions. Previously collected data are re-analyzed here using a common format and computerprograms in order to facilitate the comparisons. 2.1. Samples and Genes Examinedfor Dreissenid Mussels The population genetic characters of the dreis-senids zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha andquagga mussel D. bugensis are compared from NorthAmerican and Eurasian samples using mitochondrialDNA(mtDNA)cytochrome b genesequences,aswellaspreviouslycollecteddatafornuclearRAPDs(Ran-domly Amplified Polymorphic DNA) variation (src-inally reported in Reference 1). In the earlier nuclearDNA RAPDs study, genetic variation of 280 zebramusselsampleswereanalyzedfor63putativeRAPDsloci. (1) Those results are compared with mtDNA cy-tochrome b gene sequence data from 188 individuals,including 111 samples from throughout their NorthAmerican invasive range and 77 from Eurasian loca-tions (Table I; Figs. 1 and 2). New sampling locationsinclude those collected during a research expeditionby C. Stepien around the northern Black Sea.Variation in quagga mussels D. bugensis srci-nally were analyzed using 52 nuclear RAPDs locifor 136 individuals, including 111 from locations inthe lower Great Lakes region and 25 individualsfrom the central Dnieper River. (1) The earlier studylackedtherangeofEurasiansamplesavailableforthemore recent investigation. The present study also uti-lizes new mtDNA cytochrome b sequence data from78 individuals, including 49 from the lower GreatLakes and 29 representing their present Eurasianrange (encompassing recent invasion locations in theCaspian Sea and Volga River). (20) In addition, se-quences from the closely related saline form D. ros-triformis are compared with D. bugensis , since theformer are predicted to invade North American es-tuarine systems. (12) Samples of the remaining speciesin the genus— D. stankovici —are included in order tointerpret patterns of intra- versus interspecific varia-tion in dreissenids. Phylogenetic trees include the sis-ter genera to Dreissena ( Congeria and Mytilopsis ) asoutgroups (for systematic details see References 11,12, and 21). 2.2. Populations and Genes Analyzedfor Neogobiin Gobies Genetic diversity in the round goby Apollonia (formerly Neogobius—see Reference 9) melanosto-mus srcinally was surveyed using sequences fromthe left domain of the mtDNA control region for75 individuals, including 35 samples from a nativeEurasian site (western Black Sea at Varna, Bulgaria)and an invasive Eurasian location (Gulf of Gdansk,Poland), as well as 40 samples from five sites in thelower Great Lakes (reported in Reference 18). Thosefindings are compared here with new results fromsequencing the mtDNA cytochrome b gene, supple-mentedwithdatareportedbyDougherty,Moore,andRam. (22) We survey variation among 110 individuals,including 59 from Eurasian locations and 51 samplesfrom the lower Great Lakes (Table I).The present study analyzes variation in mtDNAcytochrome b gene sequences for 20 samples of thefreshwater tubenose goby Proterorhinus semilunaris from the lower Great Lakes and rivers draining intothe Black Sea, in comparison with 22 representativesof its sister species the marine tubenose goby P. mar-moratus. Recentresults (9) demonstratethatthefresh-water and marine clades of this taxon are separatespecies, and the historic name P. semilunaris thus hasbeen resurrected for the freshwater clade. In anotherprevious study, (18) 12 samples of  P. semilunaris weresequenced from the Lake St. Clair region for themtDNAcontrolregion(whenEurasiansampleswereunavailable). The present article compares results of the previous work with newly collected data. 2.3. Samples and Genes Tested for Ruffe Samples analyzed for the Eurasian ruffe Gym-nocephalus cernuus encompass 120 individuals from  1046 Stepien et al.      T   a     b     l   e     I  .     T   a   x   a    E   x   a   m    i   n   e    d ,    C   o    l    l   e   c   t    i   o   n    L   o   c   a   t    i   o   n   s ,   a   n    d    D    N    A    D   a   t   a    A   n   a    l   y   z   e    d    (    R   e    f   e   r   t   o    M   a   p   s   o    f    F    i   g   s .    1   a   n    d    2    )    G   r   o   u   p   e    d    L   o   c   a   t    i   o   n    S   p   e   c    i   e   s    i   n   t    h   e    A   n   a    l   y   s   e   s    B   o    d   y   o    f    W   a   t   e   r    L   o   c   a   t    i   o   n    L   a   t    i   t   u    d   e    L   o   n   g    i   t   u    d   e    S   a   m   p    l   e    S    i   z   e    S   a   m   p    l   e    S    i   z   e      E   u   r   a   s     i   a     C   y    t   o   c     h   r   o   m   e     b      R     A     P     D     S     D   r   e     i   s   s   e   n     i     d   s     D   r   e    i   s   s   e   n   a    w .    &   c .    E   u   r   o   p   e    E    b   r   o    R    i   v   e   r    C   a   t   a    l   o   n    i   a ,    S   p   a    i   n    4    1     ◦     2    5          N    0     ◦     3    9          E    5    p   o    l   y   m   o   r   p    h   a     S   m   a    l    l    l   a    k   e    N   a   a   r    R   u   p   e    l ,    B   e    l   g    i   u   m    5    1     ◦     0    0          N    4     ◦     0    0          E    1  —    L   a    k   e    I    J   s   s   e    l   m   e   e   r    A   m   s   t   e   r    d   a   m ,    N   e   t    h   e   r    l   a   n    d   s    5    2     ◦     4    6          N    5     ◦     1    4          E    5    2    4    R    h    i   n   e    R    i   v   e   r    V   u   r   e   n ,    N   e   t    h   e   r    l   a   n    d   s    5    1     ◦     2    0          N    4     ◦     2    4          E    6    2    1    L   a    k   e    D   y    b   r   z    k    C    h   o    j   n    i   c   e ,    P   o    l   a   n    d    5    2     ◦     5    0          N    1    9     ◦     0    0          E    5    1    8   n .   w .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    R    i   v   e   r   s   n .    D   a   n   u    b   e    R    i   v   e   r    B   u    d   a   p   e   s   t ,    H   u   n   g   a   r   y    4    7     ◦     2    9          N    1    9     ◦     0    0          E    5    1    9   s .    D   a   n   u    b   e    R    i   v   e   r    V    i    k   o   v   e ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    5     ◦     3    0          2    9     ◦     4    0          E    5  —    D   n    i   e   s   t   e   r    R    i   v   e   r    B   e    l   g   o   r   o    d  -    D   n    i   e   s   t   r   o   v   s    k    i    i ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    6     ◦     1    5          N    3    0     ◦     2    0          E    5  —   n .   c .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    R    i   v   e   r   s    S .    B   u   g    R    i   v   e   r    N    i    k   o    l   a   e   v ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    7     ◦     0    0          N    3    2     ◦     0    8          E    5  —   n .    D   n    i   e   p   e   r    R    i   v   e   r    K    i   e   v ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    5    0     ◦     2    7          N    3    0     ◦     3    0          E    6   c .    D   n    i   e   p   e   r    R    i   v   e   r    D   n    i   p   r   o   p   e   t   r   o   v   s    ’    k ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    8     ◦     1    5          N    3    4     ◦     0    0          E    2    1    9   s .    D   n    i   e   p   e   r    R    i   v   e   r    K    h   e   r   s   o   n ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    6     ◦     3    8          N    3    2     ◦     3    4          E    5  —   s .    V   o    l   g   a    R    i   v   e   r   r   e   g    i   o   n    K   a    k    h   o   v   s    k    i    i    C   a   n   a    l    C   r    i   m   e   a ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    5     ◦     4    6          N    3    3     ◦     2    8          E    5  —   s .    V   o    l   g   a    R    i   v   e   r    O    b   u    k    h   o   v   s    k   a   y   a    P   r   o   t   o    k   a ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    4    4     ◦     2    1          N    4    8     ◦     1    2          E    6  —    M   o   s    k   v   a    R    i   v   e   r    M   o   s   c   o   w ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    5    5     ◦     3    0          N    3    7     ◦     0    5          E    5  —   n .    V   o    l   g   a    R    i   v   e   r   r   e   g    i   o   n   n .    V   o    l   g   a    R    i   v   e   r    R   y    b    i   n   s    k ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    5    8     ◦     1    7          N    3    7     ◦     2    8          E    1  —   n .    V   o    l   g   a    R    i   v   e   r    K   o   s   t   r   o   m   a ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    5    7     ◦     5    0          N    4    1     ◦     1    0          E    3    5   n .    V   o    l   g   a    R    i   v   e   r    C    i   t   y   o    f    T   v   e   r ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    5    6     ◦     5    1          N    3    5     ◦     5    4          E    2     D .    b   u   g   e   n   s    i   s    n .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    R    i   v   e   r   s    D   n    i   e   s   t   e   r    L    i   m   a   n    B   e    l   g   o   r   o    d  -    D   n    i   e   s   t   r   o   v   s    k    i    i ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    6     ◦     1    5          N    3    0     ◦     2    0          E    2  —   s .    D   n    i   e   p   e   r    R    i   v   e   r    K    h   e   r   s   o   n ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    6     ◦     3    8          N    3    2     ◦     3    4          E    3  —   c .    D   n    i   e   p   e   r    R    i   v   e   r    D   n    i   p   r   o   p   e   t   r   o   v   s    ’    k ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    8     ◦     1    5          N    3    4     ◦     0    0          E  —    2    5   n .    D   n    i   e   p   e   r    R    i   v   e   r    K    i   e   v ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    5    0     ◦     2    7          N    3    0     ◦     3    0          E    5  —    V   o    l   g   a    R    i   v   e   r   s   y   s   t   e   m    K   a    k    h   o   v   s    k    i    i    C   a   n   a    l    C   r    i   m   e   a ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    5     ◦     4    6          N    3    3     ◦     2    8          E    3  —   n .    V   o    l   g   a    R    i   v   e   r    R   y    b    i   n   s    k ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    5    8     ◦     1    7          N    3    7     ◦     2    8          E    7  —   n .    C   a   s   p    i   a   n    S   e   a    L   a   g   a   n ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    4    5     ◦     3    5          N    4    7     ◦     4    5          E    2  —    B   o    l    d   a    R    i   v   e   r ,    V   o    l   g   a    B   o    l    ’   s    h   a   y   a    B   o    l    d   a ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    4    6     ◦     8    0          N    4    8     ◦     3    4          E    3    R    i   v   e   r    d   e    l   t   a    K   u    i    b   y   s    h   e   v    R   e   s   e   r   v   o    i   r    T   o   g    l    i   a   t   t    i ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    5    3     ◦     2    7          N    4    9     ◦     2    4          E    3      G   o     b     i   e   s     C   y    t   o   c     h   r   o   m   e     b      C   o   n    t   r   o     l     R   e   g     i   o   n     A   p   o    l    l   o   n    i   a     G   u    l    f   o    f    G    d   a   n   s    k    G   u    l    f   o    f    G    d   a   n   s    k    G    d   y   n    i   a ,    P   o    l   a   n    d    5    4     ◦     2    0          N    1    8     ◦     4    0          E  —    2    0    m   e    l   a   n   o   s   t   o   m   u   s    n .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    R    i   v   e   r   s    D   a   n   u    b   e    R    i   v   e   r    V    i   e   n   n   a ,    A   u   s   t   r    i   a    4    8     ◦     1    3          N    1    6     ◦     2    2          E    9  —    D   a   n   u    b   e    R    i   v   e   r    P   r   a    h   o   v   o ,    Y   u   g   o   s    l   a   v    i   a    4    4     ◦     1    7          N    2    2     ◦     3    5          E    2    3  —   n .    D   n    i   e   p   e   r    R    i   v   e   r    K    i   e   v ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    5    0     ◦     2    7          N    3    0     ◦     3    0          E    5  —   w .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a   w .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    V   a   r   n   a ,    B   u    l   g   a   r    i   a    4    3     ◦     1    4          N    2    7     ◦     5    8          E    1    5     ∗     1    5   n .   c .    &   n .   e .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a   n .   c .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    O    d   e   s   s   a ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    6     ◦     2    8          N    3    0     ◦     4    4          E    2  —   n .   e .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    S   e   v   a   s   t   o   p   o    l ,    C   r    i   m   e   a ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    4     ◦     3    4          N    3    3     ◦     3    4          E    6  —     (   c   o   n   t    i   n   u   e    d    )  Invasive Species Genetics 1047      T   a     b     l   e     I  .     C   o   n   t    i   n   u   e    d .     G   r   o   u   p   e    d    L   o   c   a   t    i   o   n    S   p   e   c    i   e   s    i   n   t    h   e    A   n   a    l   y   s   e   s    B   o    d   y   o    f    W   a   t   e   r    L   o   c   a   t    i   o   n    L   a   t    i   t   u    d   e    L   o   n   g    i   t   u    d   e    S   a   m   p    l   e    S    i   z   e    S   a   m   p    l   e    S    i   z   e     P   r   o   t   e   r   o   r    h    i   n   u   s    n .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    R    i   v   e   r   s    D   a   n   u    b   e    R    i   v   e   r    P   r   a    h   o   v   o ,    Y   u   g   o   s    l   a   v    i   a    4    4     ◦     1    7          N    2    2     ◦     3    5          E    3  —    s   e   m    i    l   u   n   a   r    i   s     D   n    i   e   s   t   e   r    R    i   v   e   r    B    i    l    i   a    i   v    k   a ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    6     ◦     2    8          N    3    0     ◦     1    3          E    1  —    D   n    i   e   p   e   r    R    i   v   e   r    K    i   e   v ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    5    0     ◦     2    7          N    3    0     ◦     3    0          E    5  —     P .   m   a   r   m   o   r   a   t   u   s    n .   c .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a   n .   c .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    T   y    l    i   g   u    l    E   s   t   u   a   r   y ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    6     ◦     5    0          N    3    1     ◦     1    0          E    6  —   n .   c .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    O    d   e   s   s   a ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    6     ◦     2    8          N    3    0     ◦     4    4          E    1    0  —   n .   e .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a   n .   e .    B    l   a   c    k    S   e   a    S   e   v   a   s   t   o   p   o    l ,    C   r    i   m   e   a ,    U    k   r   a    i   n   e    4    4     ◦     3    4          N    3    3     ◦     3    4          E    6  —      R   u     f     f   e     C   o   n    t   r   o     l     R   e   g     i   o   n     L     d     h     A     6     G   y   m   n   o   c   e   p    h   a    l   u   s     L   o   c    h    L   o   m   o   n    d    L   o   c    h    L   o   m   o   n    d    I   n   v   e   r   s   n   a    i    d ,    S   c   o   t    l   a   n    d    5    6     ◦     4    1          N    3     ◦     1    1          W    1    2    1    2    c   e   r   n   u   u   s     B   a   s   s   e   n   t    h   w   a    i   t   e    L   a    k   e    B   a   s   s   e   n   t    h   w   a    i   t   e    L   a    k   e    C   u   m    b   r    i   a ,    E   n   g    l   a   n    d    5    4     ◦     2    5          N    2     ◦     5    9          W    1    2    1    2    E    l    b   e    R    i   v   e   r    E    l    b   e    R    i   v   e   r    M   a   g    d   e    b   u   r   g ,    G   e   r   m   a   n   y    5    1     ◦     3    0          N    6     ◦     4    3          E    1    1    1    1    M   o   r   a   v   a    R    i   v   e   r    M   o   r   a   v   a    R    i   v   e   r    M   o   r   a   v   a ,    C   z   e   c    h    R   e   p   u    b    l    i   c    4    8     ◦     4    4          N    1    6     ◦     5    4          E    8    8    D   a   n   u    b   e    R    i   v   e   r    D   a   n   u    b   e    R    i   v   e   r    G   a    b   c    i    k   o   v   o ,    S    l   o   v   a    k    i   a    4    7     ◦     4    8          N    1    7     ◦     3    5          E    1    3    1    3    S   t .    P   e   t   e   r   s    b   u   r   g    N   e   v   a    R    i   v   e   r   a   n    d    K   o   m   s   o   m   o    l   s    k   o   e    L   a    k   e    S   t .    P   e   t   e   r   s    b   u   r   g ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    5    9     ◦     5    7          N    3    0     ◦     2    0          E    1    5    1    5    O    b    ’    R    i   v   e   r    O    b    ’    R    i   v   e   r    N   o   v   o   s    i    b    i   r   s    k ,    S    i    b   e   r    i   a ,    R   u   s   s    i   a    5    5     ◦     0    9          N    8    2     ◦     5    8          E    1    2    1    2      N   o   r    t     h     A   m   e   r     i   c   a     D   r   e     i   s   s   e   n     i     d   s     C   y    t   o   c     h   r   o   m   e     b      R     A     P     D     S     D .   p   o    l   y   m   o   r   p    h   a     U   p   p   e   r    G   r   e   a   t    L   a    k   e   s   n .    M    i   s   s    i   s   s    i   p   p    i    R    i   v   e   r    L   a    k   e    P   e   p    i   n ,    W    I ,    U    S    A    4    4     ◦     5    7          N    9    2     ◦     5    3          W    5  —    L   a    k   e    Z   u   m    b   r   o    M    i    l    l   v    i    l    l   e ,    M    N ,    U    S    A    4    4     ◦     0    7          N    9    2     ◦     2    2          W    5  —   w .    L   a    k   e    S   u   p   e   r    i   o   r    D   u    l   u   t    h  -    S   u   p   e   r    i   o   r    H   a   r    b   o   r ,    M    N ,    U    S    A    4    6     ◦     5    0          N    9    2     ◦     0    7          W    5    2    4    M    i   s   s    i   s   s    i   p   p    i    R    i   v   e   r   s .    M    i   s   s    i   s   s    i   p   p    i    R    i   v   e   r    B   a   t   o   n    R   o   u   g   e ,    L    A ,    U    S    A    3    0     ◦     2    4          N    9    1     ◦     1    1          W    5    2    6    M    i    d    d    l   e    G   r   e   a   t    L   a    k   e   s   w .   c .    L   a    k   e    M    i   c    h    i   g   a   n    S    h   e    b   o   y   g   a   n ,    W    I ,    U    S    A    4    3     ◦     4    5          N    8    7     ◦     4    2          W    7  —    L   a    k   e    W   a   w   a   s   e   e    S   y   r   a   c   u   s   e ,    I    N ,    U    S    A    3    9     ◦     5    3          N    8    6     ◦     1    6          W    5  —   n .   w .    L   a    k   e    H   u   r   o   n    M   a   c    k    i   n   a   c    S   t   r   a    i   t   s ,    M    I ,    U    S    A    4    5     ◦     1    4          N    8    5     ◦     1    1          W    5    2    8    L   a    k   e    E   r    i   e   w .    L   a    k   e    E   r    i   e    P   u   t  -    i   n  -    B   a   y ,    S   o   u   t    h    B   a   s   s    I   s    l   a   n    d ,    O    H ,    U    S    A    4    1     ◦     5    0          N    8    3     ◦     0    0          W    2    4    3    1   c .    L   a    k   e    E   r    i   e    C    l   e   v   e    l   a   n    d ,    O    H ,    U    S    A    4    1     ◦     3    0          N    8    1     ◦     4    2          W    5  —    L   a    k   e    O   n   t   a   r    i   o   w .    L   a    k   e    O   n   t   a   r    i   o    O    l   c   o   t   t ,    N    Y ,    U    S    A    4    3     ◦     0    0          N    7    9     ◦     0    0          W    5    2    2   e .    L   a    k   e    O   n   t   a   r    i   o    C   a   p   e    V    i   n   c   e   n   t ,    N    Y ,    U    S    A    4    4     ◦     2    0          N    7    6     ◦     1    0          W    5    2    1    H   u    d   s   o   n    R    i   v   e   r    H   u    d   s   o   n    R    i   v   e   r    C   a   t   s    k    i    l    l ,    N    Y ,    U    S    A    4    4     ◦     2    0          N    7    2     ◦     3    3          W    5  —    H   u    d   s   o   n    R    i   v   e   r    1    9    9    5    S   t   u   y   v   e   s   a   n   t ,    N    Y ,    U    S    A    4    2     ◦     2    0          N    7    3     ◦     5    0          W    1    2    2    2    H   u    d   s   o   n    R    i   v   e   r ,    2    0    0    3    E   a   s   t    C    h   a   t    h   a   m ,    N    Y ,    U    S    A    4    2     ◦     2    7          N    7    4     ◦     0    3          W    1    3    S   t .    L   a   w   r   e   n   c   e    R    i   v   e   r    S   t .    L   a   w   r   e   n   c   e    R    i   v   e   r    B   e   c   a   n   c   o   u   r ,    Q   u   e    b   e   c ,    C   a   n   a    d   a    4    6     ◦     2    4          N    7    2     ◦     2    3          W    5  —     D .    b   u   g   e   n   s    i   s     L   a    k   e    M    i   c    h    i   g   a   n    L   a    k   e    M    i   c    h    i   g   a   n    S   a    b    l   e    P   o    i   n   t ,    M    I ,    U    S    A    4    4     ◦     0    8          N    8    6     ◦     5    4          W    3  —    L   a    k   e    M    i   c    h    i   g   a   n    S   t .    J   o   s   e   p    h ,    M    I ,    U    S    A    4    4     ◦     0    6          N    8    6     ◦     2    9          W    1  —    L   a    k   e    M    i   c    h    i   g   a   n    M   u   s    k   e   g   o   n ,    M    I ,    U    S    A    4    3     ◦     1    3          N    8    6     ◦     2    0          W    2  —
Search
Similar documents
View more...
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks