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TABLE OF CONTENTS. READING ABE I Beginning Literacy ( ) 1. READING ABE II Beginning Basic Education ( ) 3

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements How To Use This Document READING PAGE iii v SECTION I READING ABE I Beginning Literacy ( ) 1 READING ABE II Beginning Basic Education ( ) 3 READING ABE III
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TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements How To Use This Document READING PAGE iii v SECTION I READING ABE I Beginning Literacy ( ) 1 READING ABE II Beginning Basic Education ( ) 3 READING ABE III Low Intermediate Basic Education ( ) 5 READING ABE IV High Intermediate Basic Education ( ) 8 READING ASE I Low Adult Secondary Education ( ) 12 READING ASE II High Adult Secondary Education ( ) 16 MATHEMATICS SECTION II MATHEMATICS ABE I Beginning Literacy ( ) 1 MATHEMATICS ABE II Beginning Basic Education ( ) 5 MATHEMATICS ABE III Low Intermediate Basic Education ( ) 11 MATHEMATICS ABE IV High Intermediate Basic Education ( ) 19 MATHEMATICS ASE I Low Adult Secondary Education ( ) 26 MATHEMATICS ASE II High Adult Secondary Education ( ) 32 WRITING SECTION III WRITING ABE I Beginning Literacy ( ) 1 WRITING ABE II Beginning Basic Education ( ) 3 WRITING ABE III Low Intermediate Basic Education ( ) 7 WRITING ABE IV High Intermediate Basic Education ( ) 10 WRITING ASE I Low Adult Secondary Education ( ) 13 WRITING ASE II High Adult Secondary Education ( ) 16 Georgia Adult Education Curriculum Framework - October Introductory Pages i TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE CIVICS SECTION IV CIVICS 1 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) SECTION V ESL I Beginning Literacy 1 ESL II Low Beginning 6 ESL III High Beginning 10 ESL IV Low Intermediate 15 ESL V High Intermediate 20 ESL VI Advanced 25 APPENDICES SECTION VI APPENDIX A - RESOURCES Reading 300 Most Frequently Used Words Dolch List Writing Publisher/Textbooks/Software APPENDIX B GLOSSARY APPENDIX C LESSON PLANS APPENDIX D - REFERENCES Georgia Adult Education Curriculum Framework - October Introductory Pages ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Office of Adult Literacy would like to express gratitude to all individuals past and present who contributed to this curriculum framework. This work reflects the many hours of dedication, research, and tireless effort of past committees to produce the curriculum draft of Every effort was made to use the information from that draft and in fact, it served as the foundation for this product. PHASE I The following 2007 Curriculum Committee members are commended for their commitment to this project and for their sacrifices to produce this Phase I of the Georgia Adult Education Curriculum Framework. Charita Boles Director, Adult Literary Program Savannah Technical College Donna Cutler Chairperson, ESL Program Muscogee County Schools Heather Goodman Math Teacher Okefenokee Technical College Joi King Lead Teacher, Mathematics & English Middle Georgia Technical College Pete Mills Okefenokee Technical College Tina Schnepper Lead Teacher, EL-Civics Lanier Technical College Janice Tarleton Griffin Technical College Pama Caraway Ogeechee Technical College Mary Edmondson West Georgia Technical College Jo Ann Hickman Lead Teacher, Mathematics Ogeechee Technical College Debby Milledge Lead Teacher, Dekalb Technical College Len Moore Flint River Technical College Sally Sinclair Muscogee County Schools Sandy Williams Altamaha Technical College Dahlia Wren Heart of Georgia Technical College In addition, the following members of the state administrative staff were especially helpful with research, guidance and providing professional expertise in the development of this product. Carla DeBose Director of Instructional Services Melissa Hodge-Penn Health/Workplace Literacy Coordinator Ray Thompson Region 3, Education Coordinator Glynis Terrell EL-Civics Coordinator Barbara Melvin Professional Development Coordinator Curriculum Development Facilitator Georgia Adult Education Curriculum Framework - October Introductory Pages iii PHASE II Teachers from across the state in each subject matter- and program-area were convened to form subcommittees to work on Phase II of the curriculum framework. These subcommittees took the Phase I draft product and dissected, analyzed, refined, reconstructed, deleted and added to produce the 2007 Georgia Adult Education Curriculum Framework. To the members of the subcommittees in Reading, Mathematics, Writing and ESL/Civics, we express or deep appreciation for providing the expertise and classroom perspective to ensure the content standards are meaningful and relevant. Subcommittee members are listed below: ESL/CIVICS Robin Anyanwu, Gwinnett Tech Kevin Black, Gwinnett Tech Donna Cutler, Muscogee Tech Christopher Durden, Gwinnett Tech Linda Eaton, Gwinnett Tech Minerva Frazier, East Central Tech Hope Hiott, Gwinnett Tech Martha Pressley, Gwinnett Tech Tina Schnepper, Lanier Tech Shirley Walker, Northwestern Tech MATHEMATICS Melissa Gordon, Flint River Tech Heather Goodman, Okefenokee Tech JoAnn Hickman, Ogeechee Tech Joe Jackson, Dalton State Joan Kennedy, Southeastern Tech Joi King, Middle Georgia Tech Gloria Reid, Okefenokee Tech Heidi Schuler, Appalachian Tech Dianne Wimes, Albany Tech WRITING Amy Denney, Appalachian Tech Kemso Keith, Coastal Georgia Tech Beth Magness, Lanier Tech Debby Milledge, Dekalb Tech Katrina Towns, Albany Tech READING Anne Clay, Coosa Valley Tech Donna Pierce, Northwestern Tech Sandra Griffin, Moultrie Tech Shirley Williams, Gwinnett Tech Georgia s Adult Basic Education Curriculum Framework was influenced by standards of the following states: Arizona and Nevada and Massachusetts. Georgia Adult Education Curriculum Framework - October Introductory Pages iv HOW TO USE THIS DOCUMENT These are curriculum standards that should be used to guide your instruction, identify the skills the learner should know and be able to do at each educational functioning level and in what ways the learner can demonstrate mastery of these skills. This curriculum framework is designed to assist you to help the learner reach the desired goal by providing you a roadmap of what is needed and how to get there. Its intent is to insure some uniformity of program offerings statewide. This document is not all inclusive; you as the instructor have the autonomy to customize your instruction. You are encouraged to continue to conduct research in your subject matter area, evaluate this document as an ongoing work and provide feedback for suggested improvements. CONTENT STANDARDS Standards broadly define what the learner should know or be able to do at each level. It tells what is expected, acceptable and required. Think of the standards as the skills you are trying to get the learner to accomplish before moving to the next level. Standards help instructors and learners develop plans that keep them focused and engaged. INDICATORS Benefits of Standards - Provide a common language for learners, teachers, administrators and the community at large to understand the scope of adult literacy - Enlighten learners of what they need to accomplish at each level to progress through the learning process - Encourage learners to take an active part in their learning, making the classroom setting learnercentered - Assist teachers in planning, teaching and assessing their learners. Indicators describe the knowledge and skill sets the learner needs to develop and achieve to master the standard. They provide greater detail of the specific skill and context for learners to meet the standards. BENCHMARKS (SUB-INDICATORS) Sub-Indicators and Benchmarks, often used interchangeably, are the application of knowledge and skills. They identify the specific performance levels in concrete, observable terms, serve as a checkpoint to monitor progress and assist in development of measurable performance standards and assessments. Georgia Adult Education Curriculum Framework - October Introductory Pages v SAMPLE ACTIVITIES Much care and attention was devoted to identifying activities that could be incorporated in the framework to develop and enhance life skills. Life skills are those real-life situations that the learner will encounter and handle Consumer-, Family-, Health-, and Workplace-Literacy skills. The sample activities provide suggestions of ways to measure the learner s grasp of concepts taught using life skills applications which make the activities learner-centered, realistic possibilities. Since these are suggestions, teacher creativity can expand these activities and create meaningful ways to informally assess the learner s progress and make learning interesting and engaging. Although, not indicated specifically, a variety of informal assessments (tests or quizzes) in addition to activities may be used to determine learner comprehension of the knowledge and skills specified in the standards. PERFORMANCE MASTERY STANDARDS The Performance Mastery Standards section, located at the end of each level, indicates the approved formal assessment used to determine completion and mastery of the requirements of each Educational Functioning Level. After all components of the standards are satisfactorily met, the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE) or GED is indicated and the scale scores required for completion (except for ESL and Civics). Georgia Adult Education Curriculum Framework - October Introductory Pages vi HOW TO READ THE STANDARDS STANDARDS (What the learner should know or be able to do) READING ABE I The learner will be able to... A.1 Apply recognition and decoding strategies to pronounce and derive the meaning of words. INDICATORS (The knowledge and skills the learner needs to master the standard detail the content standard) A.1.1 Identify upper- and lower-case letters. BENCHMARKS (The application of the knowledge and skills, the level of performance desired to demonstrate grasp of the concept) A.1.1 Read and write names of family members using capital and lower case letters. Standards establish the broad expectation Indicators define the knowledge and skills requirement Benchmarks describe what to look for to determine mastery (grasp) of the standard. SAMPLE ACTIVITIES (Sample applications related to real-life situations) Informal means of assessment Relate instruction to real-life situations & teach life skills. Georgia Adult Education Curriculum Framework - October Introductory Pages vii
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