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White Paper 5 EAM Steps to RCM

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W H I T E P A P E R 5 ENTERPRISE ASSET MANAGEMENT (EAM) STEPS TO RCM CONTENT LEVEL 1—DISRUPTIVE/REACTIVE (INFANCY) ................................................................ 1 LEVEL 2—FOLDERS AND SPREADSHEETS (CHILDHOOD) ............................................... 2 LEVEL 3—BASIC CMMS (ADOLESCENCE) ..................................................................... 3 LEVEL 4—INTEGRATED CMMS OR EAM (YOUNG ADULTHOOD) ...................................... 5 LEVEL 5—QUINTESSENTIAL
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     W   H   I   T   E   P   A   P   E   R 5 ENTERPRISE ASSET MANAGEMENT (EAM) STEPS TO RCM  CONTENT  LEVEL 1—DISRUPTIVE/REACTIVE (INFANCY) ................................................................1LEVEL 2—FOLDERS AND SPREADSHEETS (CHILDHOOD) ...............................................2LEVEL 3—BASIC CMMS (ADOLESCENCE) .....................................................................3LEVEL 4—INTEGRATED CMMS OR EAM (YOUNG ADULTHOOD) ......................................5LEVEL 5—QUINTESSENTIAL ASSET MANAGEMENT (MATURE ADULTHOOD) ....................7 ABOUT IFS .................................................................................................................8  1 5 ENTERPRISE ASSET MANAGEMENT (EAM) STEPS TO RCM 5 ENTERPRISE ASSET MANAGEMENT (EAM) STEPS TO RCM BY JERRY BROWNING, SENIOR BUSINESS CONSULTANT, IFS NORTH AMERICA In industrial maintenance, utilities and other asset-intensive industries, plant managers are telling maintenance managers they want them to implement the RCM (reliability-centered maintenance) processes they keep reading about in trade magazines. But many don’t really understand what RCM means or what level of organizational commitment and development are necessary to achieve it.As a business consultant with IFS, the global enterprise software company, I get asked by customers all the time about implementing RCM. I make sure to tell them that while enterprise asset management (EAM) software can support the goal eventually implementing RCM philosophies and methodologies. In order to explain how to gauge where a company’s maintenance program stands and where its goals need to ultimately lie, we need a term that is all encompassing of the total maintenance-management-process approach and ultimate goal. I call this Quintessential Asset Management (QAM). The word quintessential comes from ancient physics as the fifth element that holds the other four elements of earth, wind, air and fire together. Think of maintenance as the fifth element that brings and keeps a profitable asset-driven business together. In modern English, quintessential has come to mean the model that a concept strives to become.In embarking on your QAM journey, the first questions to ask yourself are where is your company’s maintenance program today and where do you want to take it. An enterprise needs to establish a valid benchmark of where it stands, set realistic goals and then evaluate its progress honestly and openly at predetermined intervals.In this white paper, we’ll outline the five levels of asset-management development a company usually passes through leading to more advanced processes such as RCM to eventually achieve QAM. In describing these levels of development, it makes sense to use terminology we can already relate to, so we will compare it to a familiar analog—human development. LEVEL 1—DISRUPTIVE/REACTIVE (INFANCY) The first stage of development in asset management can be compared to infancy. At this stage, a company’s maintenance program is starting from ground zero.  2 5 ENTERPRISE ASSET MANAGEMENT (EAM) STEPS TO RCM There is literally no maintenance department. Things are breaking down; operations personnel are screaming and every breakdown or failure results in production being thrown into crisis mode.Anyone who has had an infant in their home can relate to being in a disruptive/reactive mode day and night. Substantial resources and attention are devoted to responding to the child’s every need, and although first-time parenting usually comes without training, machine repair should be left to trained professionals. Unqualified personnel often try to repair or rig the machinery to get a run completed. Companies at this stage of development also depend heavily on contractors, which although safer are expensive and usually not a replacement for on-site personnel. In-house technicians who see the equipment every day get a feel for why disruptions occur and can help prevent the problems from recurring.I’ve worked in various support and managerial capacities for companies that did not have a maintenance department. Knowing my technical background, many times, I’d be sitting at my desk when someone would run in and ask me if I would get out on the floor and see if I might be able to help repair a machine and get production back up least we miss an important order. If this happens in your company, you definitely need to consider the benefits of having onsite maintenance personnel and the genesis of a structured maintenance program. LEVEL 2—FOLDERS AND SPREADSHEETS (CHILDHOOD) As an infant develops into and through childhood, they become self-sustaining. A company whose maintenance function is entering this stage of development will begin to hire their first maintenance employees. They might hire one or two technicians, and perhaps even have one of them spend time in an administrative function, creating a maintenance program that is usually calendar-based in a personal information manager (PIM) like Microsoft Outlook. So at this juncture, the technician(s) begin plotting calendar-driven maintenance activities based on equipment manufacturer’s recommendations. On a daily or weekly basis, they print off a checklist route from a spreadsheet. The work is divided up among the available technicians and saved in folders along with manuals, receipts for more significant parts or materials and notes for future reference.Many companies only move to this level to appease some quality standard for their industry such as QS or ISO. Some companies stay at this level indefinitely, perhaps due to a prevailing notion that if a technician isn’t turning tools on a broken machine, he’s wasting time. More proactive planning and management are not seen as value added items. These are counter-productive attitudes and this is where it becomes advantageous to consider graduating the maintenance program to a more organized approach through implementation of a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) or EAM software.

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Jul 27, 2017
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